Alphabetical Alumni
Young, May

Young, May

May Young

Classes of 1920 and 1926. Class of 1920. May Young. She graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1920. Source: 1920 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, page 65-85. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1926. May Young. She received a BYH Normal Diploma in 1926. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 346.

Young, Merle

Young, Merle
Orem, Utah US

Molly and Jack Nyman

BYH Class Year Unknown? 1944? [Cannot find her name with senior class in any BYH yearbook that we have.] Merle "Molly" Young. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Merle Young "Molly" Hall Nyman, age 76 of Orem, passed away on January 8, 2002. The youngest of five children, Molly was born in Salt Lake City, Utah on June 13, 1925 to Dallas Huber Young and Lucile Brady Young. Molly grew up in Salt Lake City, Vernal, and Provo, graduating from BY High. She then attended Brigham Young University where she received secretarial training. She then worked in New York City and Los Angeles for a year each, before settling in Provo, where she went to work at Geneva Steel. While working at Geneva Steel, she met Kenneth Coburn Hall, and they were married in 1952 in the Orem Community Church. They had three children, Ken Hall, Kurt Hall, and Karen Hall. Her husband Kenneth passed away in 1961. In 1975 she married Jack Lamar Nyman, who has been a loving and devoted husband for the past 25 years. Molly began working as a legal secretary with her brother, Dallas Young, in 1961. Later, she worked with her nephews, Brent and Sherman, until November 2001. Molly was a charter member of the Community Church where she held many leadership positions. Molly and her husband Jack did volunteer and service work, picking up and delivering food and serving hot meals at the Food and Care Coalition in Provo. She loved reading and was an avid bridge player. She is survived by her husband, Jack Nyman, of Orem; 2 sons and 1 daughter, Kenneth Geoffrey (Echo) Hall of Orem, Utah; Kurt Young Hall of Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Karen Hall (George) Brandt of Copley, Ohio; 1 step-son and 2 stepdaughters, Jack (Dee) Nyman Jr. of St. George, Utah; Susan Johnson of Orem, Utah; and Janice Nyman of Salt Lake City, Utah; 17 grandchildren and 1 great-grandchild. She is also survived by 2 brothers, LeGrande (Dorothy) Young of Orem, Utah, and Dallas (Rhoda Vaun) Young of Provo, Utah; 1 sister, Lillian (Keith) Hayes of Provo, Utah; and a brother-in-law, Allen B. Sorensen of Provo, Utah. She was preceded in death by her parents, Dallas H. Young and Lucile Young, and by a sister, Miriam Sorensen. Funeral services were held Saturday, January 12, 2002, in Provo. The family requests that memorial donations be made to the Food and Care Coalition of Utah Valley. [Provo Daily Herald, January 11, 2002] ~ ~ ~ ~ From: Shanda Ross [SRoss@slco.org]. Subject: Thank you. To: Webmaster [webmaster@byhigh.org, yhigh@ymail.com] Date: Tuesday, May 26, 2009. --To Whom It May Concern: I just wanted to say thank you for putting this together. These are my grandparents and it is nice to see them on this web site. Thanks again, Sergeant Shanda L. Ross, Investigator, Salt Lake County Sheriff's Office, Internal Affairs Unit (W) 801-468-3856. (C) 801-259-1300. @May 2009

Young, Michael K.
301 Gerberding Hall
Box 351230
Seattle, Washington 98195 US

Mike Young
  • Work: 206-543-5010

Class of 1967. Michael K. Young. Student Body 1st Vice President. Spanish Club, Ski Club, Letterman, Forensics, Band, Football, Tennis, VFW Oratorical Contest 3rd Place. ~ ~ ~ ~ BYU BA Political Science 1973 with highest honors. Harvard Law School JD Magna Cum Laude 1976. Michael K. Young became Dean of the George Washington University Law School and Lobingier Professor of Comparative Law and Jurisprudence in 1998. From 1985-1998 Dean Young was the Fuyo Professor of Japanese Law at Columbia University. At Columbia he was also the Director of the Center for Japanese Legal Studies and Director of the Center for Korean Studies (1985-1998) and Co-Director, Program on Religion, Human Rights and Religious Freedom (1994-1998). In addition to his academic and administrative experience, Dean Young served from 1989-1993 in the U.S. State Department, including as Ambassador for Trade and Environmental Affairs (1992-1993), and Deputy Under Secretary for Economic and Agricultural Affairs (1991-1993). He served two terms as Chair of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, and is a member of the Trade and Environment Policy Advisory Committee, Office of U.S. Trade Representative. ~ ~ ~ ~ April 30, 2004: The University of Utah community welcomed Michael K. Young as its new president. The Board of Regents approved the appointment of Mike Young after interviewing two other finalists for the job. President Young and his wife Suzan have deep roots in Utah [he is a direct descendant of Brigham Young] and both say they are excited to be moving to a state where they have friends and family. Young follows Bernie Machen who left to become president at the University of Florida. Utah conducted a national search for a new leader and 147 educators applied for the job. Young will now oversee the 28,000 students, 2,750 faculty, and 11,500 staff of the University of Utah. President Young, 54, officially assumed his duties as president on August 2, 2004, and continued until April 2011, when he left to become President of the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington. U of U Faculty Senate President Andrew Gitlin was on the search committee and says this is a good fit. “President Young brings a strong knowledge of the local Utah culture and a vast array of negotiation skills. Clearly, it is the hope of the Regents that his local knowledge and negotiation skills will reap financial benefits with the legislature.” Student Body President Alex Lowe says students on campus have been following the presidential search and are very happy with the decision. “We could not be more excited. Michael Young is exactly what the University needs and he has committed to being 100 percent accessible to students. We are looking forward to a great year”, said Lowe.

~ ~ ~ ~
Michael Young and the University of Washington seem an odd fit. But this won't be the first time that Young has met with puzzled expression. By Seattle Times staff Michael K. Young and the University of Washington seem an odd fit. Seattle, compared to most places, is unchurched and liberal. Young is a Mormon who served in the George H.W. Bush administration. But this won't be the first time that Young, announced Monday as the university's new president, has met with puzzled expression. When he was named the University of Utah's president in 2004, Young encountered a community divided, with faith and politics but two of the fault lines. In Young, all sides found cause for concern. Non-Mormons worried that Young was Mormon — a graduate of rival Brigham Young University, no less — prompting a local newspaper to compare Young's appointment to "Lincoln joining the Confederacy." Meanwhile, conservative critics of the university saw in Young an embodiment of their take on the school: liberal and elitist. Young's résumé, long on Ivy League institutions, betrayed sustained stretches in Manhattan and Washington, D.C. As president, Young soon confronted the charged issue of whether guns should be allowed on the Utah campus. The issue pitted the university and its faculty, determined to retain a gun ban, against the state Legislature. Young proved adept at navigating the currents. He met one-on-one with lawmakers and steered the debate from "pro-gun" or "anti-gun" to one of economic development, saying the ban's lifting could make it difficult to recruit top faculty. The ban ultimately was done away with, but with certain restrictions intact. In the aftermath, the competing sides agree on only this: They like the way Young handled the situation — and they're sorry to see him go. "We're mad at you that you're taking him away from us," said Steve Gunn, with the Gun Violence Prevention Center of Utah. "I am actually sad to lose him," said Rep. Curt Oda, a Republican state legislator from Clearfield. To Young's colleagues, the gun debate illustrates his skill at finding common ground and defusing tempers. They also say it shows how it can be a mistake for anyone to isolate select items from Young's résumé and draw sweeping conclusions. That résumé radiates: bachelor's degree from BYU; Mormon mission in Japan; law degree from Harvard, where he made Law Review; U.S. Supreme Court clerkship; law professor at Columbia; Mormon stake president in New York; law dean at George Washington University; ambassador for trade and environmental affairs; deputy undersecretary of state for economic and agricultural affairs; chairman of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom. Young's mentors include the late Supreme Court Chief Justice William Rehnquist, former Secretary of State James Baker III and current World Bank President Robert Zoellick. Young's diversions include scuba diving, hang gliding, riding a Harley and hiking Denali. In his youth, he considered chucking everything to be a ski instructor. But strip out the big names, impressive titles and adventurous excursions, and key themes emerge from Young's life and career: an ability to adapt; an aversion to division and paralysis; and a desire, not always realized, to meet the competing demands of family, faith and work. His family album For Young's influences, family is a good place to start. His great-great-great-grandfather was Lorenzo Dow Young, younger brother of Brigham Young, the famed pioneer some called the "Mormon Moses." Michael Young, 61, spent his early years in Sacramento, where his father worked as a civil engineer. But the family moved to Chester, a small logging town in Northern California, when Michael's uncle, a store owner, was robbed and murdered, along with his two children. Michael's parents took over the store. Michael, accompanied by his mother, later went to live with his grandparents in Provo, Utah. Michael attended Brigham Young High School, where he wrestled and won the state's debating championship, according to Jim Holtkamp, a high-school classmate. Because his father stayed in California, with the store, Michael split time between the states. In writings and in conversation with family and friends, Michael Young describes how his life has been shaped by his grandfather, his mother and his oldest son. Wilbur Sowards, the father of Michael's mother, owned a small corner grocery in Provo. But in his youth he served three missions, two in the South. Those missions were charged with danger. In Kentucky, Sowards replaced a missionary who had been lynched. In a chapter for the book "Finding God at BYU," Michael Young wrote of his grandfather: "I spent many days and evenings literally sitting at his feet, listening to him tell of his missionary experiences, of his close brushes with death, and of the Lord's intervention and protection. Those were dramatic stories for a young boy, full of high adventure, of close calls, of too many rescues to count. ... "I learned that the Lord could truly be counted on to save and protect those who were on his errand." Young's mother, Ethelyn Sowards Young, was one of eight children. She became a teacher and a pilot, and in World War II flew bombers from the factory to the European theater. When Utah Business magazine asked Young to name his most powerful influence, he cited his mother. "She taught me to believe in myself and, perhaps even more importantly, to believe in others. She taught me that service to others is the most important aim of any life and one's work life ought to reflect that. And she taught me anything was possible." Young has three children of his own. His oldest, Stewart, worked as a federal prosecutor in San Diego before joining the University of Wyoming law faculty last year. When Stewart was about 18 months old, his dad clerked for Rehnquist, then an associate member of the Supreme Court. Young was at the right elbow of history, taking long walks with Rehnquist as he struggled with Regents of the University of California v. Bakke, a landmark affirmative-action case. In the morning, before heading to the Supreme Court, Young often played with his son, rolling a ball back and forth. It was their first game of catch. Young later would tell his son that although he had the best job imaginable, "this was more fun to me than that." As his kids grew up, Young showed up for their meets and games. Stewart swam, rowed and played football; Kathryn played lacrosse, soccer and basketball; Andrew played lacrosse and ran cross country. Stewart, at age 19, served a mission in Japan, where he was allowed to call home only on Christmas and Mother's Day. His father knew how lonely the work of a missionary can be, Stewart says, so every week his dad wrote him a 15-page letter — "intensely personal," with words of encouragement and details from home. He came to know his father through those letters. "I kept them all," Stewart said. Lessons learned As a student, professor and administrator, Young has found university life to be rich with lessons that go beyond textbooks. At BYU, Young and Holtkamp attended a speech by Hubert Humphrey inside a 12,000-seat field house. To show Humphrey how Utah differed from the rest of the country, the BYU president asked all students who supported the Vietnam War to stand. Holtkamp remembers students rising across the stadium, while he and Young remained seated. Young ran into professors who forced him to think instead of simply memorize. "My initial reaction was, of course, high irritation," Young wrote of those days. "After all, I thought I understood the game pretty well, and I had certainly mastered it, at least as I understood it: The teacher would present me with prepackaged material, and I would memorize it quickly and repeat it back on the examination. The teacher would then give me a good grade, and we would both pretend that I was smart." After getting his Harvard law degree and clerking for Rehnquist, Young became a law professor at Columbia, where he directed the Center for Japanese Legal Studies. He tried to compartmentalize, but learned the difficulties of chasing tenure while raising kids. "I occasionally used the Socratic method at the dinner table and cut up the food of my dinner companion at a formal banquet," he wrote in an article in the Brigham Young University Law Review. Young's daughter, Kathryn Owen, says that in Manhattan, her dad made a point of being home for dinner and tucking the kids into bed. She didn't learn until years later that he would then go back to work for hours. While teaching law, Young imbued his kids with a sense of adventure. He let them go bungee jumping. He let his daughter get a pilot's license while in high school. Owen, now 31, went on to graduate from the Air Force Academy. Young learned of the effect his faith could have on others. "In the academic universe, phrases like 'revealed truth' and 'I have a testimony' have a tendency to stop conversations and clear the faculty lunchroom," he wrote in the law review article. After 20 years of teaching, Young left Columbia to become dean of George Washington University law school. His first day, the plumbing broke, turning the school's largest classroom into "a beautiful, though highly inappropriately located, reflecting pool," he wrote in a Toledo Law Review article. Cleaning up afterward, he found there were no paper towels. He muttered about the dean, only to remember: He was now the dean. "Three steps ahead" Through the years, Young has been quick to adapt. When he went to work for the State Department in 1989, he was tapped as a specialist on Japan. But almost immediately he was designated the United States' lead lawyer in the negotiations to reunify Germany. On the plane ride over the Atlantic, he dived into large volumes of German history. At the University of Utah, Young's versatility has likewise been in demand. Randy Dryer, a university trustee who has worked with six school presidents, says he knew Young was special from the get-go. "Most presidents come in and want to clean house and put in their own hand-picked folks," Dryer said. "Mike came in and quickly realized he had a top-notch leadership team. He just added his own political savvy." Showing a talent for triangulation, Young avoided alienating would-be opponents, according to interviews with more than a dozen Utah power brokers. Young met with state Senate President John Valentine, who said the new president was "just delightful and gracious." David Clark, a former state House speaker, said of Young: "If I were playing chess, this is definitely someone I would like to have on my team. He was always three steps ahead." Young showed a talent for fundraising — more than doubling the university's donor base — and a willingness to battle when needed. He fought when lawmakers tried to limit faculty tenure, Dryer says. When animal-rights groups began protesting near the homes of faculty who used animals in their research, Young lobbied for an ordinance restricting picketing in residential areas. As his track record drew notice, other universities came calling. When Young became a finalist for a job at Dartmouth, Utah induced him to stay with a $275,000 bonus in 2009. At Utah, Young also sat on the boards of several companies, including one, MagnetBank, that failed two years ago. In June 2009, an arbitration panel headed by Young delivered a critical ruling involving NAFTA. A month later, Young testified before Congress to blast the Bowl Championship Series. At a hearing requested by Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, Young took the BCS to task, saying college football's structure for determining its championship penalized all but six conferences. Utah had just completed an undefeated season but was shut out of the championship game. Some of Young's vocabulary — for example, "dialogic" and "self-referential" — missed his target audience. "Self-what now?" Hatch asked. But Young found his stride. He boiled his argument to its basics — "Championship should be decided by competition, not conspiracy" — and even issued a challenge, telling the University of Nebraska's chancellor, who was also testifying, that he wished the Cornhuskers "were willing to play us." The personal is public In 2010, news broke in the Utah newspapers that Young was getting divorced from Suzan, his wife of more than 30 years. Michele Mattsson, vice chair of the university's board of trustees, said Young's divorce was "shocking and unsettling" and had "divided loyalties" on campus, where Suzan Young ran a popular lecture series. "It may be good for him to have another opportunity at this time," Mattsson said. Young, in an interview with The Seattle Times, said: "This has been a painful, personal situation, for sure. But I've not sensed any lack of momentum on the part of the university. We raised more money this year than we raised last year, and more money last year than we did the year before. "Look, Utah is not an easy place to get divorced. ... And I do sometimes think it makes it harder here maybe to accept a simple and true explanation. ... Is he having a psychotic breakdown? Is he gay? Is he having an affair? Is he sleeping with sheep? Is he clinically depressed? A lot of that stuff is said. And truth of the matter is it's just much simpler than that. "It's what happens in a marriage, and I also hope people understand, you don't leave a 35-year marriage casually." James Macfarlane, former chair of the University of Utah trustees, said the divorce didn't endanger Young's job. But it may have made it easier for Young to leave. "I think he's looking for a new start and a more open situation." Originally published April 26, 2011, Seattle Times, reported by Jonathan Martin, Craig Welch, Bob Young, Jim Brunner and Ken Armstrong, and written by Armstrong. @2011

Young, Mildred

Young, Mildred
Provo, Utah US

Mildred Young

BYH Class of 1924. A female student named Young is shown in a composite Class of 1924 photograph of 4th Year (senior) BYH students. Surname source: 1924 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section. Records show two female students named Young who graduated in 1924: Mildred Young, of Provo, Utah, and Lavon Young of Blanding, Utah. A third female student, Zela or Zelma Young, received a Normal Diploma (teaching) in 1924. ~ ~ ~ ~ Mildred Young, of Provo, Utah. Mildred is listed as a 4th Year (senior) student at Brigham Young High School in the Class of 1923. She is also listed as a 4th Year (senior) BYH student in the Class of 1924. We're assuming she needed additional classes to graduate in 1924. Background sources: BYU/BYH Annual Catalogues for the School Years 1923-24, 1924-25, and 1925-26.

Young, Nora E.

Young, Nora E.

Nora Young

Brigham Young High School, Class of 1909. Nora E. Young. She received a Normal Diploma. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B.Y. Academy, Book 2, Page 218.

Young, Oscar Brigham

Young, Oscar Brigham
Provo, Utah US

Oscar Young

Board of Trustees, 1901 to 1909. Oscar Brigham Young was born on February 10, 1846 in Nauvoo, Illinois. His parents are Brigham Young and Harriett Elizabeth Cook. He married twice: 1. Paralee Russell on August 25, 1862 in Salt Lake City, Utah. 2. Annie Marie Roseberry on October 25, 1875 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died on August 4, 1910 in Provo, Utah. Interment, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Young, Patricia

Young, Patricia
Murray, Utah

Patti VanWagenen

Class of 1947. Patti Young. She married _______ VanWagenen. Our devoted mother, grandmother, sister, and friend, (Mary) Patricia Young VanWagenen, passed away at home on October 16, 1999, after a valiant battle with cancer. (Patti did not use her first name.) Born October 14, 1929, to George Leonard Young and Elsie Irene Torkelson in Butte, Montana. She lived in California, Boise, Provo, and spent most of her adult years in Salt Lake City. She is survived by her sister, Jacqueline Young (W. Mack) Lawrence (BYH Class of 1945) of Salt Lake City; daughters, Cathy VanWagenen (Brian) Zarkou of Boise, Idaho; and Sheralin VanWagenen (Troy) Christensen of Logan, Utah; son, Bradford VanWagenen; and 10 grandchildren. Patti graduated from the University of Utah in secondary education. She was affiliated with Alpha Chi Omega. After she graduated, she worked as an executive secretary for ZCMI. Pat later worked for the Granite School District as a secretary. In 1990 she received Secretary of the Year Award which recognized her many years of kind, caring service rendered to students, teachers and parents. Patti had many wonderful experiences while traveling with friends and family. She loved to visit the ocean. She was a woman of many talents and abilities which included woodworking, tole painting, flower pressing and arranging, and was always making thoughtful, homemade gifts for others. She was a wonderful cook and a gracious hostess. She had the ability to make and keep lasting friendships. She was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and served with enthusiasm in many capacities. She enjoyed singing in the choir. Recently she served as a temple worker. The greatest joy Pat experienced was in spending time and in serving her family. Her lifetime efforts were concentrated on making life better for her children and grandchildren and in helping them to succeed. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, October 20, 1999, in Murray, Utah. Interment, Wasatch Lawn Memorial Park. [Deseret News, Monday, October 18, 1999.]

Young, Richard W.

Young, Richard W.
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Richard and Minerva Young

Board of Trustees, 1903 to 1920. [The following record is for Richard W. Winter who died in December of 1919. It is likely correct, although his term on the Board of Trustees extended through 1920.] Richard Whitehead Young was born on April 19, 1858 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents are Joseph Angell Young and Margaret Whitehead. He married Minerva Richard on September 5, 1882 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died on December 27, 1919 in Salt Lake City.

Young, Rose

Young, Rose

Rose Young

B. Y. Academy High School Graduate, Class of 1901. Rose Young. She also received a Special Certificate in Phonography. [Phonography is a system of shorthand stenography developed by Isaac Pitman.] Source: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, Page 17.

Young, Sondra
543 East 2780 North
Provo, Utah 84604-5917 US

Sondra and Robert Jones
  • Work: (801) 356-3686

Class of 1967. Sondra Young. Pep Club, F.H.A., Thespians, Symphony Debonairs, Science Club, Drama, Forensics, Band, Wildcat Yearbook Staff (Assistant Photographer), Basketball, Track, Softball, Gymnastics (2nd All-Around), 4th Year Seminary, Girls' State, Anna B. Hart Literary Award, Girls P.E. Service Award. BYU BA English & Teaching Certificate 1972. BYU MA History 1995. Sondra Young Jones, Provo, has written her first book, a revisionist history based on research she did for her masters thesis at BYU. The Trial of Don Pedro Leon Lujan: The Attack Against Indian Slavery and Mexican Traders in Utah was published by the University of Utah Press in November 1999. An adjunct writing instructor at BYU and at Utah Valley State College, she is working on another book about the history of the Ute Indians in Colorado and Utah. Husband, Robert Jones, BYU 76. @2007

Young, Susa

Young, Susa
Provo, Utah US

Susa and Jacob Gates

Faculty & Staff. Susa Young Gates, Domestic Science teacher, 1897-1903. Board of Trustees, Brigham Young Academy, 1891 to 1933. ~ ~ ~ ~ Susa (Susan, Susannah) Gates was born on March 18, 1856, in Salt Lake City. A writer, publisher, advocate for women's achievements, educator, missionary, genealogist, temple worker, wife, and mother of thirteen children, she was fond of saying, "Keep busy in the face of discouragement." The second daughter of Brigham Young's 22nd wife, Lucy Bigelow Young, Susa Young has been called "the most versatile and prolific LDS writer ever to take up the pen in defense of her religion". Following private education that included music and ballet, she entered the University of Deseret at age thirteen. The next year she became co-editor of the College Lantern, possibly the first western college newspaper. In 1872, at age sixteen, she married Dr. Alma Bailey Dunford; they had two children, Leah Eudora Dunford and Alma Bailey Dunford. The marriage ended in divorce in 1877. The next year, Susa entered Brigham Young academy in Provo and, while a student, founded the department of music and conducted a choir. During a trip to the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), she renewed her acquaintance with Jacob F. Gates, whom she married on January 5, 1880. The success of their marriage has been attributed to their mutual respect for, and support of, one another's work. Only four of the eleven children born to this marriage survived to adulthood: Emma Lucy Gates Bowen, Brigham Cecil Gates, Harvey Harris (Hal) Gates [BYH Class of 1909~H?], and Franklin Young Gates. During the 1880s and 1890s, Susa Gates focused her energy on childbearing and child-rearing, missionary work, education, writing, and women's concerns. After completing a Church mission with her husband to the Sandwich Islands in 1889, she founded the Young Woman's Journal. It was adopted as the official magazine for the Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Association in 1897. She founded the Utah Woman's Press Club, became press chairman of the National Council of Women, and founded the Relief Society Magazine, which she edited until 1922. She wrote biographies of Lydia Knight and of her father, Brigham Young, novels including "John Stevens' Courtship" and "The Prince of Ur" -- a pamphlet entitled the "Teachings of Brigham Young," and a history of women in the Church, on which she was still working at the time of her death. Concern for women's achievements was a prominent force in Susa Gates's life. During the 1890s, while she was most occupied with raising her own children, she became a charter member of the National Household Economic Association and was a representative to women's congresses in Denver, Washington, D.C., Toronto, and London, where she was invited to speak on the topic "Equal Moral Standards for Men and Women" and where she joined other women of the International Council, including Susan B. Anthony, for tea with Queen Victoria. At the turn of the century, Susa suffered a nervous and physical breakdown. Ill for three years, she was forced to terminate a mission that she and her husband had begun in 1902. A priesthood blessing that promised her she would live to do temple work marked the beginning of her recovery. She underwent a year of intense spiritual introspection and later wrote of that period, "I disciplined my taste, my desires and my impulses — severely disciplining my appetite, my tongue, my acts … and how I prayed!" (Person, p. 212). While maintaining her commitments to family and women's advancement, she focused her energy on genealogy and temple work. In 1906, Susa Young Gates organized genealogical departments in two newspapers, the Inter Mountain Republican and the Deseret News, and wrote columns for both papers over the next ten years. She produced instructional manuals for genealogists, devised a systematic index of names for the Church, and published the Surname Book and Racial History. In 1915, she introduced genealogical class work at the International Genealogy Conference in San Francisco and became head of the Research Department and Library of the Genealogical Society of Utah in 1923. She personally cataloged more than 16,000 names of the Young family. She spent much time in the last years of her life doing ordinance work in the Salt Lake Temple with her husband. She died on May 27, 1933. More biographical information

Young, Wayne R.
1054 North 440 West
Orem, Utah 84057 US

Wayne Young
  • Work: (801) 235-1699

Class of 1970. Wayne Young. BYU Counseling & Guidance Teaching Certificate 1975. BYU BS Physical Education 1975. Pennsylvania State University MA 1980. University of Utah MD 1990. PUBLICATION: In the book, Becoming One: Intimacy in Marriage, by Robert F. Stahmann, Ph.D., Wayne R. Young, M.D., and Julie G. Grover, M.D., the authors state: “This book is written to give you a perspective of how you and your marriage partner are similar and, at the same time different in your physical, sexual, and emotional makeup.” WAYNE R. YOUNG, M.D., Advanced Women's Healthcare: Timpanogos Medical Building, 742 West 800 North, Orem, Utah 84057 - 801-222-9244 - 801-222-9226 (FAX) - RCOHOON@COGOLINK.COM Wayne R. Young, PC, Obstetricians & Gynecologist, Locations: - American Fork, Utah (UT) 84003 - Orem, Utah (UT) 84097 - Saratoga Springs, Utah (UT) 84043

Young, Willard

Young, Willard

Willard Young

Board of Trustees, 1909 to 1917. Willard Young was born on April 30, 1852 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents are Brigham Young and Clarissa Ross. He married Harriet Hooper on August 1, 1882 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died on November 30, 1939.

Young, William H.

Young, William H.

William Young

BY Academy High School Class of 1886. William H. Young. Awarded Special Certificate in General Chemistry. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 25, 1886.

Young, Zela or Zelma

Young, Zela or Zelma
Mona, Utah US

Zela or Zelma Young

Class of 1924. BYH Class of 1924. A female student named Young is shown in a composite Class of 1924 photograph of 4th Year (senior) BYH students. Surname source: 1924 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section. Records show two female students named Young who graduated in 1924: Mildred Young, of Provo, Utah, and Lavon Young of Blanding, Utah. A third female student, Zela or Zelma Young, received a Normal Diploma (teaching) in 1924. ~ ~ ~ ~ Zelma Young. Zelma Young received a Normal Diploma, BYH Class of 1924. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, Page 468. [Research by Scott Cowley.]

Young, Zina

Young, Zina
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Zina & Thomas/ Chas. Williams/Card

Class of 1880? Faculty & Staff. Zina Young Williams, Training School, 1879-1884. Board of Directors, 1918 to 1930. A daughter of Brigham Young, Zina Young was born April 3, 1850, in the "old log row the first house built by Brigham Young after he entered the Salt Lake Valley." She was given the name of her mother, Zina Diantha Huntington Young, by her father. The Huntington family roots dated back to England. The family immigrated to America in 1633 and established themselves in the state of Massachusetts. They were strict Presbyterians. Samuel Huntington was reportedly one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Zina D. H. Young herself, Zina Card's mother, was a notable figure of Mormon history. Married first to Henry Bailey Jacobs, then sealed to Joseph Smith and then Brigham Young, she was the wife of two prophets. She, like her daughter who would follow, worked in the Church Relief Society, was matron at the Salt Lake Temple and later, General President of the Relief Society. Zina Card and her mother, Zina D. H. Young, were close. Family papers are replete with references to this mother and daughter bond. In the Brigham Young family Zina Card, the daughter, grew up as one of "the big ten"--this was what President Young called his ten eldest daughters and it gave young Zina both refined learning opportunities and a position of prominence. She moved into the "Lion House" when she was six years of age and lived with twenty-nine other children. Zina wrote affectionately of her life in her father's home: "How joyous were our lives. There were so many girls of nearly the same age, and everything was so nice. Our mothers all occupied their apartments on the center floor. The upper floor we children had for bedrooms. Downstairs were the dining room, kitchen, wash room, school room, weave room, and cellars. The parlor, a large well-lighted, well-furnished and well-kept room was the place where our father assembled his family every evening for prayers. No scene is more vivid in my mind than the gathering of our mothers with their families around them, our loved and honored father sitting by the round table in the center of the room. We all controlled every childish display of temper or restlessness, and a sweet spirit of reverence pervaded all hearts. His presence was commanding and comforting, a peaceful control of his family that brought love and respect for him and each other, and his prayers were the grandest and most impressive I have ever heard." Brigham Young tried to provide a good education for his children and "to give everyone in his family an opportunity for knowledge, improvement and culture". They had a music teacher, a dance teacher and a governess. When they had learned a song, a dance or a part in a play they performed it for their father. Zina's first educational classroom experience was conducted in the basement of the Lion House, where Harriet Cook, another one of Brigham Young's wives, conducted school classes for the children. Zina was first married, at the age of eighteen, to Thomas Williams. Williams, age 40, was an employee of Brigham Young. He had worked as manager of the Salt Lake Theatre and as Young's bookkeeper for several years. Little was written of this relationship perhaps because William's death cut it short. John Taylor became the third President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, serving from October 10, 1880 to July 25, 1887. Some months after becoming President of the Church, President Taylor was visited by Zina Young Williams, the Dean of Women of the Brigham Young Academy in Provo and a daughter of Brigham Young. The Academy was less than a decade old and was experiencing serious financial difficulties that, if not resolved, would mean its closing. After listening to Sister Williams's plea for help, President Taylor took her hand "in a fatherly way" and said: "My dear child, I have something of importance to tell you that I know will make you happy. I have been visited by your father. He came to me in the silence of the night clothed in brightness and with a face beaming with love and confidence told me things of great importance and among others that the school being taught by Brother [Karl G.] Maeser was accepted in the heavens and was a part of the great plan of life and salvation; . . . and there was a bright future in store for . . . preparing . . . the children of the covenant for future usefulness in the Kingdom of God, and that Christ himself was directing, and had a care over this school." [Leonard J. Arrington, ed., The Presidents of the Church (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1986), pp. 108-109] Zina and Charles Ora Card's relationship began at the time she was Matron of Brigham Young Academy. Card had two of his own children, from his first marriage, who were in attendance and Zina was involved in counselling his daughter. Card saw his daughter's disenchantment with her father and his Church as a result of his controversial (polygamous) public life, and he encouraged her to seek out "Sister Zina and allow her to advise you." Card made several trips to Provo visiting his own children and was also reportedly heroic in saving some of the books and valuable papers from a fire which almost destroyed the school. The relationship between Zina and Card grew serious following the dedication of the Logan Temple. Zina and her mother had been called to work in the Temple, May 19 [1884]. They were considering the purchase of C.O. Card's home in Logan where they expected to live and work in the temple. It was on May 25, 1884 while at her home in Provo making provisions to move to Logan that she received a letter from C.O. Card proposing marriage: While she respected him very much she had never thought of marrying him. She deferred answering him until she went back to Logan. She had a dream that convinced her that he was the right man. They were married on the 17th of the following June, 1884. She was thirty-four years of age, he was forty-five. Zina returned to Logan from Canada in 1903 after her husband became ill, in Cardston, and after his death, at age 67, September 9, 1906, she moved to Salt Lake City where she lived the remainder of her life. Zina had five children--Sterling Williams, Thomas Edgar Williams; and Joseph Young, Zina Young (the third Zina) and Orson Rega Card. She was appointed as a member of the L.D.S. Primary General Board, where she served for the next fifteen years, and assumed the duties as matron of the L.D.S. Business School in Salt Lake City. On January 31, 1931, at 81 years of age Zina passed away quietly in her sleep.

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