Alphabetical Alumni
Whitehead, LeRoy

Whitehead, LeRoy

LeRoy Whitehead

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1926. LeRoy Whitehead. He received a BS Degree in Business & Accounting in 1926. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 396.

Whitehead, Walter Farrer

Whitehead, Walter Farrer
Salt Lake City, Utah

Walter and Bessie Whitehead

Class of 1920. Father, grandfather and great-grandfather, Walter Farrer Whitehead, 87, of Salt Lake City, died May 8, 1990, at his home. He was born October 17, 1902, in Provo, to Walter P. and Mary Ettie Farrer Whitehead. He married Bessie Williams on October 28, 1926, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. She died Aug. 18, 1989. He spent his early years in Provo and graduated from Brigham Young High School. He worked Farmers Insurance Co., having opened many areas in the upper midwest states. He was a member of the LDS Church. He served a mission to England, then with his wife served a mission in Ontario, Canada. He served diligently in many capacities in the Church. He is survived by three daughters, Gwendolyn C. Brewer and late husband (Everett), Thousand Oaks, Calif.; Patricia Sorensen and husband, Richard, Salt Lake City; Mary Jean Wagner and husband, John D., Provo; a son, Don R. Whitehead and wife, D'Ann, Englewood, Colorado; 16 grandchildren; 18 great-grandchildren; two sisters, Edith Bush and husband, Ray and Mary Duke, and husband, Melvin, all of Springville, Utah. Besides his wife, he was preceded in death by a son, Walter W. Whitehead. Funeral services were held Friday, May 11, 1990, in Salt Lake City. Burial was in the Provo City Cemetery. [Published in the Deseret News, Wednesday, May 9, 1990.]

Whitely, Alicebeth

Whitely, Alicebeth
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Alicebeth and Robert Ashby

Class of 1931? Alicebeth Whiteley Ashby died on November 26th, 2004 in Salt Lake City, Utah at age 90. The third child of Joseph Earl Whiteley and Amanda Elizabeth Beck, Alicebeth was born July 10, 1914, in the rock house at her parents' homestead at the base of Middle Mountain, near the Warm Springs at Oakley, Cassia, Idaho. She was named for her grandmothers, Alice Mariah Adams Whiteley and Elizabeth Healey Beck. During her childhood, five more children were added to the family. Alicebeth worked hard on the farm, milking cows night and morning and riding the derrick horse. She often said that she truly learned the value of work in her younger years--not only how to work, but how to enjoy it. The depression of the 1930s caused the family of eight children, with a ninth expected, to give up their town home in Oakley and move to a one-room frame home at their farm west of Oakley. At that time, Alicebeth joined her sister Helen in Provo, Utah to attend Brigham Young High School [Class of 1931?]. Alicebeth always loved music. She played the French horn in the Oakley High School Band and at Brigham Young University. She studied voice and sang the lead role in the operetta "Hansel and Gretel." She sang in choirs throughout her life, and it brought her much joy. Alicebeth had four life goals: to graduate from college, to serve a mission, to sing in the Tabernacle Choir and to marry in the temple and have a family. With optimism, enthusiasm and hard work, she achieved everything she set her mind to do. Alicebeth graduated with honors from Brigham Young University, working at three jobs to pay for tuition, housing and voice lessons. She majored in secondary education and English at BYU and also studied at the University of Idaho at Moscow and the University of California at Berkeley. She taught school for ten years, at high schools in Iona, Oakley, and Burley, Idaho, and at the LDS Business College. She sang in the Tabernacle Choir and was a member of the General Board of the Mutual Improvement Association. She served in the Eastern States Mission for two summers and had fond memories of participating in the Hill Cumorah Pageant. Returning often to her home and family in Oakley, Alicebeth was greeted with eager anticipation, as she related the latest events of her life, which were, according to Alicebeth, always extraordinary. In 1946 Alicebeth married distinguished scientist Robert Morrell Ashby (from American Fork, Utah) in the Salt Lake Temple. His work took them to Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he was a physicist for the Radiation Laboratory at M.I.T. and then to Pasadena, California, where he was a vice-president at North American Rockwell. In Pasadena, Alicebeth served as president of the stake Mutual Improvement Association for 11 years (under Stake President Howard W. Hunter) and as president of the ward and stake Relief Society. She valued the gifts and talents of those she served with, and they became her dearest friends. In 1988, she was honored with the Emeritus Club Recognition Award from B.Y.U. Alicebeth was well-loved by family and friends. She was a magnet to many because of the warmth and beauty of her home (filled with beautiful antiques, artistically arranged) and because of how her guests were made to feel about themselves when in her company. Countless friends enjoyed breakfast in her sunny kitchen--always with china, crystal, silver, fresh-squeezed orange juice, homemade granola, and sparkling conversation. She was a real leader, with an extraordinary ability to put together a choir or program with style and excellence and have all the participants feel lucky to be involved. Many people came to her for advice and comfort, and she was a popular speaker at meetings and conferences. Her sisters always said that she was the one everyone wanted to be with, and wherever she was, it was a party. At her departure here, Alicebeth has been reunited with her husband Robert, her parents, her brother and sister-in-law Dorothy Smith and Winslow Beck Whiteley, brother Osburn Earl Whiteley, and brother-in-law Loftis Jolley Sheffield. Surviving her and remembering her with awe and appreciation are sisters Helen Amanda Whiteley Taylor (George), Blanche Whiteley Sheffield, Mary Whiteley Salisbury (Joseph), and Joyce Whiteley Jacobsen (Owen); brothers John M Whiteley (Barbara), and Joseph Reed Whiteley (Jane). She is survived by her children Marilyn Ashby McPhie (Craig), David Whiteley Ashby, and Janet Elizabeth Ashby Cramer (Joseph); ten grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren. Services were held Saturday, December 4 in Salt Lake City. Interment, American Fork Cemetery. [Deseret News, Wednesday, December 1, 2004.]

Whitely, Joseph

Whitely, Joseph
Provo, Utah US

Joseph Whitely

Faculty & Staff. Joseph Whitely, Literature & Ancient Languages teacher, 1893-1894.

Whitesides, Marilyn

Marilyn Whitesides

Class of 1946. Marilyn Whitesides. She graduated from BYH on May 23, 1946. Source: 1946 BYH Graduation Exercises Program. She performed a piano solo, "Polonaise," by Chopin, at the conclusion of graduation exercises.

Whiting, Edward A.

Whiting, Edward A.
La Grande, Oregon US

Edward and Mary Whiting

BY Academy High School Class of 1894. Edward A. [most likely Edward D.] Whiting. Edward received a Diploma in Bookkeeping. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, page 201. ~ ~ ~ ~ Edward Daniel Whiting was born on June 17, 1875 in Springville, Utah. His parents were Edward Lucian Whiting and Martha Elizabeth Alleman Whiting. He married Mary Emelia Olsen. He married Mary Olsen on February 10, 1904 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was born on October 7, 1877 in Logan, Utah. She died on September 19, 1970 in Pendleton, Umatilla County, Oregon. Her interment, La Grande, Oregon. Edward D. Whiting died on October 31, 1964 in La Grande, Union County, Oregon. His interment, La Grande, Oregon.

Whiting, Fern

Whiting, Fern

Fern Whiting

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1920. Fern Whiting. She received an AB Degree in Home Economics in 1920. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 134.

Whiting, John Martin

Whiting, John Martin
Los Angeles, California US

John and Irene Whiting

Class of 1911. John Martin Whiting, of Mapleton, Utah. Normal [Teacher Prep]. "Born on Easter morning, 1873, 15 miles west of Tucker. Herded cows during his younger days and later made a young fortune killing grasshoppers for bounty. A member of the University baseball team and physical director of W.B.S.E. (Whiting Brothers Surplus Energy) at Mapleton." Source: BYHS Yearbook 1911. ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 2: John Martin Whiting. He earned a BYH Normal Diploma in 1911. Annual Record, B.Y. University (BYU Records Office), Book 3, page 424. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1919. John Martin Whiting. He received an AB Degree in History & Sociology in 1918. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 3, page 424. ~ ~ ~ ~ John Martin Whiting was born on February 1, 1890 in Mapleton, Utah. His parents were Albert Milton Whiting and Harriet Susannah Perry. He married Annie Irene (Irene) Cox of Bunkerville, Nevada, on November 29, 1912 in St. George, Utah. He died on August 17, 1967 in Los Angeles, California.
______________

By 1910, gas stations began building bigger structures that included offices. The earliest companies, such as Shell and Standard Oil, began to take advantage of the space on the side of the buildings, painting their logos and names across the side. The Whiting Brothers. In 1917 Art and Earnest Whiting began selling gasoline out of 55 gallon barrel drums. From Saint John, Arizona, the brothers expanded fulfilling the needs of motorists with gas stations and motels across the Southwest from Shamrock, Texas to Barstow, California. By the 1920s, gas station buildings often included canopies, added to protect their customers from the heat or rain. After Route 66 began to channel traffic through the eight states, gas stations started offering repairs and other services and the structures were enlarged again as service bays were added to the buildings. These structures continued to evolve over the years to the place that they are today, sometimes no bigger than those first early structures. It was during the same year that Route 66 began to be built that the Whiting Brothers discovered that with just a little lumber from their father’s mill, they could easily construct a profitable gas station. Originally founded in Saint John, Arizona in 1926, Whiting Brothers Station soon became a familiar sight all along Route 66, as well as other areas in the Southwest. Extremely profitable, the brothers continued to expand their empire, adding souvenir shops, cafes, and Whiting Brothers Motor Inns to many of their stations. For years and years, the Whiting Brothers businesses were a staple along the Mother Road, along with Stuckey’s, Burma-Shave signs, and Indian Joe’s Trading Posts. The Whiting stations suffered the same fate as Route 66. As Interstate 40 began to replace Route 66 section by section, the Whiting stations fell into decline. Along with so many other profitable businesses along Route 66, the Whiting Brothers ended in the 1990s. Today, with the exception of one remaining Whiting Brothers Station in Moriarty, Arizona , and a few buildings that have been utilized for other businesses purposes, all that’s left of the Whiting empire are its fading yellow and orange signs and crumbling buildings. Soon, these too will most likely disappear, ending another chapter of Route 66 history.

Whiting, Katheryn (Catherine, Kathryn)

Whiting, Katheryn (Catherine, Kathryn)
Ogden, Utah US

Katheryn & Abram [Richards] Strate

Class of 1917. Katheryn Whiting [Strate, Richards]. She received a BYH Normal Certificate in 1917. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 8, page 335. ~ ~ ~ ~ Kathryn (or Catherine) Whiting was born on August 24, 1897, in Mapleton, Utah. Her parents were Albert Milton Whiting and Harriet Susanna Perry Whiting. ~ ~ She married twice: first, to Renton Richards on July 5, 1919. Born February 21, 1895 in Sterling, Utah, Renton was an auto mechanic. His parents were Edward R. Richards and Goldie L. Snow Richards. Renton and Katheryn were divorced, and Renton died on September 30, 1933 in Eureka, Utah. His interment, Manti, Utah. Katheryn second married Abram C. Strate [or Abraham] on November 11, 1933. Abram was born May 6, 1886 in Spring City, Utah. His parents were Henry Strate of Denmark, and Mary Acord, of Iowa. Abram died on November 1, 1955 in Columbia, Carbon County, Utah, a retired maintenance superintendant. His interment, Price City Cemetery, Utah. ~ ~ Katheryn Whiting Strate died on December 12, 1989 in Ogden, Utah. Her interment, Price City Cemetery, Utah.

Whiting, Lorna

Whiting, Lorna

Lorna Whiting

Class of 1923. Lorna Whiting. She received a BYH Normal Diploma in 1923. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 466.

Whiting, Margaret (1908)

Whiting, Margaret (1908)

Margaret Whiting

Brigham Young High School, Class of 1908. Margaret Whiting. She received a Normal Diploma. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B.Y. Academy, Book 2, Page 68. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1922. Margaret Whiting. She received an AB Degree in Art in 1922. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 100.

Whiting, Peggy Lee Mellor

Whiting, Peggy Lee Mellor
Tacoma, Washington US

Peggy and Chris Hill

Class of 1943 ~ Honorary. Peggy Lee Whiting. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Peggy Lee Whiting Hill. On October 12, 2000, Peggy returned joyfully to her Heavenly Father. After years of vibrant health, she battled cancer and suffered a stroke. She was born in Provo, Utah on October 19, 1925 to Ralph and Ada Mellor. After her father’s early death and Ada’s remarriage to Vernon Whiting, Peggy was known as Peggy Lee Whiting. Blessed with a remarkable voice, she studied and performed in New York City and Los Angeles, California. She had leading roles with major opera companies, was a guest soloist with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, but most loved singing lullabies to her five children. She used her God given creative talents of serving, gardening, cooking, interior design and teaching music to bless and brighten the lives of those around her. As a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, she found great joy in serving as choir director, Relief Society teacher, Young Women’s President, and in writing and directing many musicals and roadshows. With her vivacious and cheerful spirit, she would light up a room. Because of her endearing qualities, Peggy made friends wherever she went. She is survived by her husband, Chris Hill, married for 52 years; her children: C. Greg (Shawn) Hill of Tacoma; Charlotte Hill Pacheco of Wyoming; Linda Hill Gustafson of Carlsbad, California; Steven (Brenda) Hill of Puyallup, Washington; Christine Hill (Brad) Moore of Puyallup, Washington; 18 grandchildren, 7 great-grandchildren, brother John R. Whiting of Palm Springs, California, and sister Ann Timothy of Salt Lake City, Utah. Grandmother Peggy will be greatly missed by all her family and friends. Those whom we have loved never really leave us. They live on forever in our hearts, and cast their radiant light onto our every shadow. [Tacoma News Tribune, November 28, 2000.]

Whitlock, Merrill Niels

Whitlock, Merrill Niels
Mayfield, Utah US

Merrill and Bardella Whitlock

Class of 1914. Merrill Whitlock. Graduated in 1914 from Brigham Young High School, Agricultural Department. Source 1: 1914 BYU Banyan, BYH section, pp. 84-89. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1914. Merrill Whitlock. He received a BYH Agriculture Diploma in 1914. Source 2: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 6, page 438. ~ ~ ~ ~ Merrill N. Whitlock was born on June 8, 1894 in Mayfield, Sanpete County, Utah. His parents were Charles Clyde Whitlock Sr., and Annie Elizabeth Petersen Whitlock. Merrill married Bardella Nielsen [Gueska Bardella Nielsen] on May 10, 1916 in Manti, Utah. Bardella was also born in Mayfield, Utah in 1895. Their children included three sons: Don M. Whitlock, Lee C. Whitlock, Clair M. Whitlock; and one daughter, Marilyn Whitlock. Merrill Whitlock died November 21, 1970 in Provo, Utah. His interment, Mayfield, Sanpete County, Utah.

Whitlock, Royal

Whitlock, Royal
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Royal and Lily Whitlock

Class of 1914. Royal Whitlock. Graduated in 1914 from Brigham Young High School. Source 1: 1914 BYU Banyan, BYH section, pp. 84-89. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1914. Royal Whitlock. He received a BYH Commercial Diploma in 1914. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 6, page 107. ~ ~ ~ ~ Royal Whitlock was born on April 25, 1894 in Mayfield, Sanpete County, Utah. His parents were George Quayle Whitlock, born in Utah, and Matilda Whitlock [Matilda Victor Bundersson], born in Sweden. Royal married Lily Elvira Olsen Whitlock [sometimes Lillie], also born in 1894. One record says Lily was born in Mexico, others say Mayfield, Utah. Royal and Lily were married on June 2, 1915 in Manti, Utah. This family included the following children, all born in Utah: Aldous O. Whitlock, Alice Whitlock, Royal C. Whitlock, Genevive Whitlock, Glen Whitlock, and Beth Whitlock. Royal Whitlock died on July 18, 1977 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His interment, Murray, Salt Lake County, Utah.

Whitney, Orson F.

Whitney, Orson F.
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Orson and Zina Whitney

BYA Faculty. Orson F. Whitney. Born July 1, 1855 in Salt Lake City, Orson F. Whitney, who became a poet, teacher, historian and apostle, was the grandson of one of the original twelve apostles under Joseph Smith, Jr., Heber C. Kimball. One of his earliest memories was the family moving as Johnson's Army approached Salt Lake City. Raised in Salt Lake City, a city flourishing with literature, art, drama, architecture and more importantly, the gospel of Jesus Christ, Whitney showed a propensity for music and drama, and later showed talents for poetry, writing and preaching. He taught himself to play the flute early in life and his love of music and drama continued throughout his life. He became determined to pursue a life on the stage in New York City, and Whitney's mother offered to sell a tract of land to finance her son's endeavor. It was to no avail, the land would not sell. It was not until he made the decision to serve a mission for the Lord that the land sold and financed his mission to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ. At twenty-one he was called to serve a mission in Pennsylvania, the first of his many mission fields over the years. Elder Whitney admitted that during this time he was still not fully committed to the work of spreading the gospel. He wrote of a dream that completely turned him around: "I thought I was in the garden of Gethsemane, a witness of the Savior's agony. I seemed to be standing behind a tree in the foreground of the picture, from which point I could see without being seen. The Savior, with the Apostles Peter, James and John, entered the garden through a little wicket gate at my right, where he stationed them in a group, telling them to pray. He then passed over to my left, but still in front of me, where he knelt and prayed also. His face, which was towards me, streamed with tears, as he besought the Father to let the cup pass, and added, 'not my will but thine be done.' Having finished his prayer, he arose and crossed to where the Apostles were kneeling fast asleep. He shook them gently, they awoke and he reproved them for their apathy. Again he bade them pray, and again crossed to his place and prayed, returning as before to find them sleeping. This happened three times, until I was perfectly familiar with his face, form and movements. He was much taller than ordinary men, and though meek, far more dignified than any being I had ever beheld; and he wore a look of ineffable tenderness and compassion, even while reproving His disciples. My heart went out to him as never before to anybody or to anything; I loved him with all my soul. I wept at seeing him weep, and felt for him the deepest sympathy. "Then of a sudden the circumstances changed, though the scene remained the same. Instead of before the crucifixion, it was after. The Savior and the three Apostles, whom he had beckoned to him, now stood in a group at the left, and were about to take their departure, ascending into heaven. I could endure it no longer, but rushed out from behind the tree, fell at his feet, clasped him around the knees and begged him to take me also. With a look of infinite tenderness, as of a father or an elder brother, he stooped, lifted me up and embraced me, saying as he did so in the kindest and gentlest manner possible, while slowly shaking his head and sweetly smiling, 'No, my son, these can go with me; for they have finished their work; but you must stay and finish yours!' Still I clung to him, and the contact was so real that I felt the warmth of his bosom as I rested upon it. Gazing up into his face, I once more besought him, 'Well, promise me that I will come to you at the last.' Again he smiled sweetly, and there was a look as if he would have gladly granted my request had it been wise to do so. He then said, 'That will depend entirely upon yourself.' I awoke with a sob, and it was morning. This dream made a wonderful impression upon me, paving the way to my thorough conversion, which soon followed. Among the things it taught me was not to sleep at my post, and to regard first the duties of my mission, and not allow anything to interfere with them." (Source: Jensen, Andrew, "Latter-Day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia: A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints," Oct 2005) His efforts redoubled, Orson F. Whitney served an honorable mission in Pennsylvania and Ohio before returning home to Salt Lake City. Fully committed to the faith now, Elder Whitney sought work which would not require him to work on Sunday, which killed the journalist job he'd been offered. He prayed diligently for a job and weeks later was offered a position at the Deseret News through the influence of Elder Brigham Young, Jr., an apostle at the time. In 1878 he was called to the office of bishop, at the age of 23 and unmarried -- virtually unheard of -- and became much beloved as Bishop Whitney. On December 18, 1879, he married Zina Beal Smoot in the Salt Lake City Endowment House. While serving as a bishop, and as a husband and eventually new father, he was called to serve on the city council. Nominated and elected without his knowledge, he found out the same way everyone else did, while reading his morning paper. It wasn't long before he was called to serve in the European mission as editor of the Millennial Star, a Mormon publication. He served throughout Europe, preaching of Jesus Christ and the restoration of His gospel for two years, from 1881 to 1883. Upon his return, he accepted an appointment on the city council and remained in that office until 1890, being re-elected every two years. He declined nomination in 1890 and turned his efforts to other pursuits. However, throughout the remainder of his life, he remained very active politically. His first book, "The Life of Heber C. Kimball," was published in 1888. His second, "Poetical Writings," was released 1888/1889. Through a very troubled time in Mormon Church history Whitney developed a close relationship with the prophet, Lorenzo Snow, and much of the preaching of the Church fell on his shoulders. A defender of Women's Suffrage, Orson F. Whitney fought hard for the right of women to vote, and he won. It was written into the constitution of Utah, and he was one of the committee that rewrote the entire constitution before it was submitted to Washington, D.C. Ever true to his deep and abiding love of the Savior, he taught theology and English at Brigham Young Academy in Provo. He was then elected to the state senate in the fall of 1898. In 1899 Whitney, still bishop, began work in the Church Historian's office. "His duties comprised the keeping of the Church journal, the answering of correspondence, the writing of special articles for the press and such other service as may be necessary. In literary work, discourses, lectures, orations, funeral sermons and miscellaneous addresses, along with his ecclesiastical labors, his mind, tongue and pen were kept constantly busy." (Ibid) In April of 1906 he was called to the office of apostle and wept a little as he shed the mantle of bishop he'd held for so long. As an apostle, a special witness of Jesus Christ, he preached across America and Europe for years, again spreading the word of the restoration of the Savior's gospel. Of this gospel he loved so much, he said: “The spirit of the gospel is optimistic; it trusts in God and looks on the bright side of things. The opposite or pessimistic spirit drags men down and away from God, looks on the dark side, murmurs, complains, and is slow to yield obedience. We should honor the Savior’s declaration to be of good cheer. (In Conference Report, Apr. 1917, 43) - and - “To whom do we look, in days of grief and disaster, for help and consolation? … They are men and women who have suffered, and out of their experience in suffering they bring forth the riches of their sympathy and condolences as a blessing to those now in need. Could they do this had they not suffered themselves? “… Is not this God’s purpose in causing his children to suffer? He wants them to become more like himself. God has suffered far more than man ever did or ever will, and is therefore the great source of sympathy and consolation.” (“A Lesson from the Book of Job,” Improvement Era, Nov. 1918, 7) After a long and fulfilling life as a servant of God, son, husband, father and grandfather, Orson F. Whitney passed away May 16, 1931 in Salt Lake City, Utah, and was finally, as he'd longed for during his mission, gathered into the arms of his Savior, Jesus Christ, and welcomed home.

Whitney, Ron
PO Box 1211
Spanish Fork, Utah 84660-7211

Ron Whitney
  • Work: 801-225-4414

Class of 1957. Ron Whitney. Retiree a fixture at Maple Canyon campground - Story by Mark Johnston, The Daily Herald - August 24, 2012 PROVO — Pulling a red bandana from his pocket, Ron Whitney, 73, removes his glasses and dabs the sweat from his face, forehead and neck. Sitting at the table inside his aging camper, Whitney opens a large bottle of Powerade and sips the cold drink, enjoying a little reprieve from the summer heat outside. It’s a well-deserved morning break for Whitney, the campground host at Whiting Campground in Maple Canyon. After an early start cleaning up after the weekend rush, there is still much more to do. Anyone visiting the campground in the past three years will have no doubt spotted Whitney, maybe even stopped to chat with him or just seen the host and his dog briefly, cruising by in a golf cart, arm outstretched in a friendly wave. Upon retiring from what Whitney calls “real world work,” he quickly signed up with the recreational management company American Land & Leisure and was applying for the Whiting Campground before the company even got the contract for it. For four years he worked at other campgrounds before finally settling in the familiar surroundings east of Mapleton. “I relate to this canyon. My dad was born and raised in Mapleton so we spent a lot of time up here when I was young,” he told the Daily Herald, recalling family gatherings and camping trips in the area and hunting his first deer on the mountain above. “I’ve been coming up this canyon mostly all my life,” Whitney said. From the sound of it, a good deal of that life has been spent working hard and that doesn’t seem to be changing even in retirement. After graduating from Brigham Young High School in 1957, Whitney served in the U.S. Navy, worked on road construction, as a taxi cab driver and at the Tooele Army Depot loading ammunition, and that’s just scratching the surface. He even started his own recreation cleanup company, maintaining campsites in the Spanish Fork District. The business didn’t last long, however, as the U.S. Forest Service implemented pack-in-pack-out, and his services were no longer required. It was tough work while it lasted, 12 hours a day, six days a week, but it was work he enjoyed. “Now at my age I’m doing good getting this campground cleaned up in a week,” Whitney said, still sipping Powerade while enjoying his break, one of a number he takes to divide up his daily workload. Arriving the first of April, Whitney gets a head start cleaning up the campground before visitors begin arriving Easter weekend. For the next six months he lives at Whiting, packing up around mid-September after the last of the large group reservations have come and gone. Waking early and having a quick breakfast, Whitney is usually at work by 8 a.m., looking to get most of the difficult tasks done before the heat of day. With 25 campsites and two large group sites to take care of, there is plenty for one man to do, keeping him busy six days a week. Whether checking on reservations, doing the paperwork, painting tables, cleaning bathrooms (the “technical work,” as he calls it), digging out fire pits or enforcing the rules, Whitney takes great pride in his work and is happy to hear any compliments that come his way. He gives guests a quick rundown of the most important rules he wishes them to follow: pets on leash, generators off 10 p.m. to 7 a.m., litter-free campsite, extinguish fires with water. “And No. 5 — enjoy,” he said to new guests before pulling away on his golf cart, his dog Baby sitting next to him keeping an eye out for visiting canines. Each Tuesday Whitney gets a day off, if you can call it that. He works on his truck, gets a haircut for the dog, goes to doctor appointments, does laundry, buys groceries. The list goes on and on, making his workweek sound easy. “It’s getting harder as I get older,” Whitney said, admitting it takes him a little longer to get the work done than it did three years ago. He frequently gets help from local Boy Scout troops and other volunteers. “I’m a firm believer that if you get volunteers, use ‘em,” he said. “It takes a lot of work off my shoulders.” With or without the help, Whitney wouldn’t give it up. He enjoys the work, enjoys his trailer, enjoys the simplicity of it all. “It’s simple, it’s easy. Most expensive thing is keeping gas in this generator so I can watch my John Wayne movies,” he said, showing off a collection of DVDs including some of his favorites — “Green Berets” and “Chisum.” If he’s not enjoying a good movie, he’s working his way through a stack of used books picked up from the book exchange in Spanish Fork. “Usually by six or seven o’clock I’m plugged into a movie or reading a book,” he said. The 17-foot trailer is a bit small, and one day he hopes to upgrade if even by just a few feet. But it seems that’s a lot of money and a long way off. Still, Whitney seems comfortable in the old trailer, shaded from sun and sheltered from wind by a nice canopy of trees, a comfortable mattress to sleep on, a table to eat and work at and plenty of friendly neighbors coming and going from all over the world. The best part of living in the trailer is that come the end of the season, “Just hook onto it and,” Whitney whistled, pointing down the winding road to the valley below, “down the canyon I go.” By the time September rolls around he’s usually looking forward to leaving, but by that time he’s also signed the papers to come back the following year. While he’d initially planned on only signing up as camp host for a single season, just to say he had the experience, Whitney is working his seventh year and planning on doing the same next spring. The winter he’ll spend down in the valley, maybe in Nephi. “Home is where the trailer is now,” he said. Information from: The Daily Herald, Provo, Utah Source @2012

Whittaker, Archie C.

Whittaker, Archie C.

Archie Whittaker

BY Academy High School Commercial Class of 1902. Archie C. Whittaker. He received a diploma from the Commercial program. Source: Commercial Graduating Class Program, College Hall, Tuesday, May 27, 1902. Source 1: Commercial Graduating Class Program, College Hall, Tuesday, May 27, 1902. BYU Special Collections, UA 1008, Box 1, Folder 2, 1902 Commencement Program.

Whittaker, James C.

Whittaker, James C.
Of Circleville, Utah US

James Whittaker

Class of 1912. James C. Whittaker, of Circleville, Utah. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1912. Source: 1912 BYU Mizpah, BYH section, photos and names on pp. 1 - 62, 105.

Whittaker, Louise

Whittaker, Louise
Provo, Utah US

Louise Whittaker

Brigham Young High School Class of 1905. Louise Whittaker. She received a Normal Diploma. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 2, page 95. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Louise Whittaker, Household Economics teacher, 1898-1902.

Whittaker, Martha A.
3587 22nd Street
Boulder, Colorado 80304-1905 US

Martha & Christopher Muller
  • Work: 303-444-5224
  • Home: (303) 444-5224

Class of 1965. Martha Whittaker. Spanish Club, Pep Club, F.H.A., Honor Society, Drama Superior State, Chorus, Wildcat Yearbook Editor, Outstanding BYH Student. ~ ~ ~ ~ Married Christopher Muller. Martha A Whittaker-Mueller: Market and Client Relations, CARL [Library] Systems, Inc., Boulder, CO, 80203, 1990. ~ ~ ~ ~ Household: Martha A Mueller, Christopher B. Mueller, Henrietta W. Mueller. @2010

Whittle, Kennen
3833 Park Road
Sacramento, California 95841 US

Kennen Van Wagenen

Class of 1954. Kennen Whittle (female). Chorus, Y'ld Cat Newspaper. Married ______ Van Wagenen. --@2001

Whittle, Sonja
281 East 1620 North
Orem, Utah 84057 US

Sonja and Dennis Peterson
  • Work: 801-235-9987
  • Cell: 801-372-8943

Class of 1957. Sonja Peterson. Student Body Historian. Quill & Scroll, Pep Club, Notre Maison, Y'ld Cat Newspaper Staff Social Editor, Chorus. Born June 24, 1939. Married Dennis E. Peterson, March 28, 1957. Six children: David, Nathan, Aaron, Kristin, Jared, Adam, and ten grandchildren. Dennis received his Bachelors and Masters degrees from BYU, worked on a Ph.D. at Oregon State University, and was a professor of biological sciences. He served as a bishop, counselor in a stake presidency and stake president. I am a reading tutor, have taught seminary and served in Relief Society, Young Women and Primary. We have served three missions together, the most recent being in Sweden 2005-2006. @2006 ~ ~ ~ ~ Email sent to speterson@myldsmail.net bounced back. @2010

Whitwood, Ernest G.

Whitwood, Ernest G.
Provo, Utah US

Ernest Whitwood

BYH Classes of 1908 and 1913, and Faculty. Ernest G. Whitwood. Source: 1908 BYH Commencement Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1913. Ernest G. Whitwood. He received a BYH Music Diploma in 1913. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 3, page 423. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Ernest G. Whitwood, Training School, 1908-1909.

Whyte, James

James Whyte

Class of 1943. James Whyte. Aberdeen High School, Aberdeen, Idaho 1-2. ~ ~ ~ ~ IS THIS? James Lee Whyte was born January 3, 1926 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents were William Chapman Whyte and Elizabeth Ann Lofgreen. He married _________ Palmer. James Lee Whyte died October 22, 1980. ~ ~ ~ ~ IS THIS? Richard James Whyte of West Jordan, Utah? ~ ~ ~ ~ IS THIS? James Robert Whyte of Salt Lake City, Utah?

Wickes, David F.
2475 Maple Creek Lane
Sandy, Utah 84092 US

David Wickes
  • Work: (801) 576-9751

Class of 1973. David Wickes. BYU BA Business IPA 1979. BYU MBA 1981. David F. Wickes.

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