Alphabetical Alumni
Tanner, Jennie Harrington

Tanner, Jennie Harrington
Provo, Utah US

Jennie & Jos. Marion Tanner

Faculty & Staff. Jennie Tanner, Ladies Department, 1883-1888. Jennie Harrington Tanner, 1857–1916, born in American Fork, Utah. “In 1878 Jennie married Joseph Marion Tanner, a professor at Brigham Young Academy in Provo. Later, Jennie became the superintendent of women at the Academy. . . . When after five years of marriage, Jennie had no children, she agreed that Joseph marry a second wife, Annie Clark, in 1883. Six months later, Joseph married Josephine Snow. In 1888, Joseph and Jennie had a home in Logan where Joseph was principal of the Brigham Young College on the site of the current Logan High School. Jennie was a teacher there. Around 1890, a daughter, LaRue, was born to them. Annie Clark Tanner and Josephine Snow Tanner and their children had gone underground since it was then impossible to live an openly polygamous life following the passage in 1887 of the Edmunds-Tucker Act and the Woodruff Manifesto of 1890. After his appointment as president of the Agricultural College of Utah, [today known as Utah State University] in 1896, Joseph, very likely with Jennie and LaRue, moved back into the Farm House on campus . . . Joseph ultimately resigned his position on Feb. 3, 1900 rather than abide by the Manifesto of 1890 and give up the practice of polygamy. ‘It became clear, all known polygamists would have to leave.’ (Margary Ward, A Life Divided: the Biography of Joseph Marion Tanner 1859–1927. (Salt Lake City: Publishers Press, 1980), 37–38).” See “Utah State University: Wives of the Presidents.”

Tanner, John D.
7150 J Bar B Drive
Granite Bay, California 95746 US

John and Barbara Tanner
  • Work: (916) 791-4295

Class of 1957. John D. Tanner. Tennis, Model U.N. BYU BS Industrial Education 1965. He married Barbara.

Tanner, Joseph Marion

Tanner, Joseph Marion
Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada CA

Joseph & 5 wives Tanner

BY Academy High School Class of 1878. BYA Faculty & Staff. Joseph Marion Tanner, Faculty of the Training School & Commerce, 1879-1884. ~ ~ ~ ~ Brigham Young Academy alumnus Professor J. M. Tanner is the President-Elect of the Agricultural College (Utah State) in Logan. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 18, 1896. ~ ~ ~ ~ Joseph Marion Tanner was born on March 26, 1859 in Payson, Utah. His parents were Myron Tanner and Mary Jane Mount Tanner. He married five times: The first two were Josephine Snow and Jennie Harrington, married to Joseph on November 15, 1878 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He next married Annie Vilate Clark [BYA High School Class of 1883], on December 27, 1883 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He also married Carrie Amelia Peterson [BYA High School Class of 1893, Music] and Lydia Matilda Holmgren. ~ ~ ~ ~ Joseph Marion Tanner died on August 19, 1927 in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. His interment, Salt Lake City, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ BRIEF BIOGRAPHY: Joseph M. Tanner (1859–1927) Born in Payson, Utah. Married to Jennie Harrington, Annie Clark, Josephine Snow, Carrie Preston, and Lydia Holmgreen; 24 children. He attended Brigham Young Academy as a student and later taught there. He served a mission to Europe and the Middle East from 1884 to 1887. Upon his return, he served as principal of Brigham Young College in Logan, Utah. In 1896 he was appointed as the president of Utah State Agricultural College, serving until 1900. In 1901 he succeeded Karl G. Maeser as superintendent of Church schools, in which position he served until his retirement in 1906. Source.

Tanner, Larry Kent
171 Springhill Drive
North Salt Lake, Utah 84054-1718 US

Larry Tanner
  • Home: 801-936-7332

Class of 1956. Larry Tanner. Spanish Club, Quill & Scroll, Chess Club, Thespians, Yld Cat Newspaper Sports Editor, Model U.N., Junior Prom Committee, Senior Hop Committee. ~ ~ ~ ~ After graduating from BY High, Larry attended BYU for two years and then joined the United States Air Force, which sent him to Yale University where he graduated with a BS in English. He was then assigned to and worked for the National Security Agency (NSA) for the remainder of his military commitment. Larry then went to work for United States Steel where he remained until retiring after seventeen years. He has been employed with Arnold Machinery as the Warranty Administrator for the past fifteen years. In 1986, Larry was responsible for establishing a Utah chapter of the “City of Hope” foundation which is involved in the research of treatments and cures for many diseases including HIV/AID’s and Diabetes. His ongoing affiliation with this charity primarily involves fundraising. Although most of his free time is spent with “City of Hope” activities, he continues to occasionally enjoy outside activities such as golf and fishing. @2010

Tanner, Lucy

Tanner, Lucy
Provo, Utah US

Lucy Tanner

Faculty & Staff. Lucy Tanner, Training School, 1881-1884.

Tanner, Lura

Tanner, Lura

Lura Tanner

Class of 1919. Lura Tanner. She graduated from BYH in College Hall on Wednesday, May 28, 1919. Source: 1919 Graduation Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ Second source: 1919 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, pages 61-74. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1919. Lura Tanner. She received a BYH Academic Diploma in 1919. Source 3: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 48.

Tanner, Lynn [W. Lynn]
407 33rd Avenue SW
Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2S 0S8 CA

Lynn and Margaret Tanner
  • Work: (403) 287-2163

Class of 1956. W. Lynn Tanner. His parents are Dr. Wilmer W. Tanner and Helen Brown Tanner. His siblings are Mary Ann Tanner Barnett, of Alpine, Utah; and David W. Tanner, of Salt Lake City, Utah. Lynn’s family includes his wife Margaret Graw; their daughter, Dr. Whitney Tanner, and her husband, Paul Horvath, live in Laguna Niguel, California; their daughter Jill and husband Dave Marko live in Los Angeles, California with careers in Hollywood – two children Violet and Vivian; and their son, Ladd W. Tanner and wife Lara, have two children, Marcus and Tess, and live in Salt Lake City, Utah. As an entrepreneur, Dr. W. Lynn Tanner negotiated the license for T.E.C. (The Executive Committee) Ltd. Bringing to Canada the pre-eminent organization dedicated to increasing the effectiveness and enhancing the lives of CEOs. Establishing the first TEC group in Calgary, Alberta in 1985, he has since built an organization that has groups spanning from Victoria to Halifax (13 cities). As one of fourteen international partners, he is also a member of the International Partners’ Executive Council. Today TEC has over 12,000 members in fourteen countries. At the Maxwell School of Syracuse University, Lynn was a NDEA (National Defense Education Act) scholar. This three-year fellowship started his teaching career where he completed his PhD in organization change strategies. At Florida International University, he was a member of the original faculty writing graduate and undergraduate programs, and hiring faculty. During his five years there the school grew to 30,000 students. He was then recruited to the University of Calgary and resigned in 1982 to pursue consulting and other business opportunities. As well, has owned restaurants and developed a tree farm on his 900 acre ranch along the Bow River, a significant catch-and-release fly-fishing river. Prior to teaching, he was with Pan American World Airways, holding positions of Senior Financial Analyst to the Senior Vice President of Finance, Manager of Customer and Cargo Services for East Africa, living in Nairobi, Kenya. His consulting has focused on mergers/acquisitions and reorganizations. Some clients have included CP Hotels, Knight Ridder newspapers, the U.S. State Department, the White House, General Electric, Canterra, Esso, Province of Alberta, Premier, Cabinet, and Caucus. Continues to hunt and fish each year and travels with his wife extensively around the world. In the last five years, has climbed Mount Kilimanjaro and has visited Europe, Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Vietnam, Malaysia, China, and Japan. Has enjoyed his fishing boat and home on the northwest corner of Vancouver Island and his home in Los Angeles, California. My wife Margaret and our five grandchildren allow for many great times. @2006

Tanner, Marilyn

Tanner, Marilyn
Layton, Utah US

Marilyn and Edward Murphy

Class of 1943. Marilyn Tanner. Provo High School 1, Opera 2, Girls' Athletic Association 2, Notre Maison 3. Married Edward Smith Murphy. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Layton, Utah - Marilyn Tanner Murphy, beloved wife, mother and grandmother, peacefully departed this life January 8, 2001. Marilyn was born in St. George on February 1, 1924, the third daughter of Dr. Vasco M. Tanner and Annie Atkin Tanner. While her father taught and earned his higher degrees she lived in St. George and Palo Alto, California. She spent the rest of her childhood in Provo. Marilyn attended schools in Provo and graduated from Brigham Young High School in the Class of 1943. Afterwards, in 1946, she received a degree in history and teaching from Brigham Young University. Marilyn loved children and taught at several elementary schools in Vernal and Jordan School districts. In 1949, she met Edward S. Murphy, a pharmacy student from Ogden studying at Idaho State University. After a long-distance courtship they were married in her father's home on June 33, 1952. During their early years the happy couple lived in Provo, Preston, Clearfield and Ogden, eventually settling in Layton. Their union was blessed with four sons, Howard T. Murphy, Ogden; Philip E. (Renee) Murphy, Provo; Michael (Elizabeth), Layton; and John M. (Leslee) Murphy, Tucson, Arizona. Marilyn enjoyed traveling and gardening and loved being in the great outdoors. She was always close to nature and animals and had a special fondness for dogs and snakes. Her childhood was spent in the mountains and deserts of the Great Basin and she always loved the Intermountain West. Its beauties and history were her constant delight. During her life she was active in several civic organizations such as the Girl Scouts, the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, the Layton City Library Board, and the American Association of University Women. A lifelong member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Marilyn held numerous positions in the Young Women's organization, Primary, and Relief Society. But her first love was her husband and family and we are all deeply saddened with her passing. We rejoice in her life and the great blessing it was to share it with her. Now she is with her parents and other loved ones who have passed on before. God bless you, Marilyn, as you move on and upwards to the Father of us all. Marilyn is survived by her husband, children, three sisters, Carol Smith, Gloria Smith, Carmela Forsyth, a brother, Jordan Tanner and 12 grandchildren. Funeral services were held Friday, January 12, 2001, at the Valley View Stake Center, 1589 E. Gentile Street in Layton, Utah. Her interment, Lindquist's Memorial Park at Layton, 1867 N. Fairfield Road. [Provo Daily Herald January 10, 2001] ~ ~ ~ ~ FAMILY: Parents: Professor Vasco Myron Tanner (born October 29, 1892 in Payson, Utah) and Annie Atkin Tanner (born December 14, 1891). Vasco and Annie married on June 5, 1917. The children of Vasco and Annie Tanner included: Carol Tanner, married Leo Evan Smith; Marilyn Tanner, married Edward Smith Murphy; Carmela Dawn Tanner, married David Pond Forsyth; Gloria Tanner, married Maurice Smith; and Vasco Jordan Tanner, married Pat Nowell.

Tanner, Mathias C.

Tanner, Mathias C.

Mathias Tanner

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1921. Mathias C. Tanner. He received an AB Degree in French & Latin in 1921. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 334.

Tanner, Myron

Tanner, Myron
Provo, Utah US

Myron & Mary / Ann Tanner

Board of Trustees, Brigham Young Academy, 1875 to 1897. Myron Tanner was born June 7, 1826, at Bolton Landing, Warren County, New York on the shores of Lake George. He married Mary Jane Mount May 22, 1856, at Salt Lake City, Utah. She was born February 27, 1837, at Toledo, Ohio. The couple had nine children. He was married a second time, May 19, 1866, in Salt Lake City, Utah to Ann Crosby. She was born December 4, 1846, at Manchester, England. The couple had eight children. Myron was the oldest of the children of Elizabeth Beswick and John Tanner. He was born into a home which his mother described as comfortable and wealthy. Myron was very young when the Mormon missionaries came to his home, and his parents and the older members of the family embraced the gospel. The family moved to Kirtland, Ohio, in December 1834, when he was just past eight. He went to school for a time in a "little red school house, between his home and the temple," where he received the education available to children of pioneering communities. He attended three short terms at Kirtland, was about all the formal education he ever received, though he did attend school for a short time in Nauvoo. By the time the family moved to Far West, Missouri in 1838, he was twelve. At Far West, Missouri, he tells of being sent with an older brother into Clay County, to secure if possible, sufficient supplies of wheat for food and planting. As wheat was in short supply, they were able to obtain only a limited amount, and the family was always near the hunger line. At this tender and impressionable age Myron witnessed the mobbings and persecutions heaped upon the Saints, and since the entire family was in the midst of the conflict, he knew what it was to come face to face with violence. His closest encounter with tragedy was the day he accompanied his father to a gristmill twelve miles distant to grind corn. The story is told of how his father saw the mob coming and sent Myron to hide in the brush. After spending the night hiding in a neighbor's home, he made his way home to report that his father had been beaten over the head with a gun and severely injured. This young man experience many such incidents from the time he was eight until he enlisted in the Mormon Battalion when he was twenty. By the time the Tanner family moved to Montrose, Iowa, in 1840, Myron was a sizeable lad of fourteen, and beginning to share the hard work of the farm. In 1844 his father, John Tanner, was called on a mission to New York to electioneer for the Prophet Joseph who was a candidate for the presidency of the United States. In his absence from the farm, he left Albert, youngest son of his second wife, and Myron in charge. There are no particulars available as to what happened, but Albert and Myron were unable to work in harmony, and as a consequence Albert left the home of his stepmother and half brothers and went off on his own, leaving Myron with the entire responsibility for managing the farm. By 1844 Myron was eighteen years old. Myron found that managing the large farm and trying to coax work from his younger brothers was a sizable job, and when his father returned in the fall, John was disappointed at the way the farm had been handled. Myron was deeply hurt by his father's displeasure and carried the hurt throughout his life. He felt he had done as well as anyone his age and experience could have been expected to do. He probably had, and John Tanner, now a man of sixty-six, was not handling the generation problem as well as he might. But Myron goes on to say that in the ensuing years all was forgiven on both sides and an even closer bond was forged between them. It was during the last two years the Saints were in Nauvoo that Myron finished his schooldays. "In 1844 I was permitted to attend school seven weeks, and in 1845 ten weeks. That completed my school days," he said. In 1846 when the Saints entered upon their enforced exodus to Utah, Myron, along with his brother Albert, enlisted in the Mormon Battalion for a year's service. Myron became ill and left the Battalion, wintering in Pueblo. He later joined the Saints on the exploring expedition into the Salt Lake Valley. After a short stay in the valley, Myron and several others returned to Winter Quarters. Myron made himself useful around Winter Quarters that fall and winter until time for the folks to go West in 1848. But, George A. Smith requested that he remain another year on the Missouri River, assist him in planting another crop, and then help him move his family to Utah in 1849. George A. Smith's farm was in Kanesville and a good crop was harvested in 1848. Since he had been around farm animals all his life, Myron knew how to manage teams and wagons and was placed in charge of George A.'s Ten. He managed the Ten with such skill, that he was soon placed in charge of the entire train which was under the direction of George A. Smith and Ezra T. Benson. Myron explains one of the improvements he made in the method of travel: Whenever we reached a place where I thought we were likely to be stuck in the mud, I would double my teams and put the wagons through one at a time. Such method was so much more expeditious than waiting until the wagon became fastened in the mud, and then trying to pull it out. Many of the people in the train were not as experienced as Myron, and he must have seemed wise beyond his years. He made proper excuses for the leading brethren in the train saying: "Some of these brethren whose lives had been given largely to the ministry were hardly familiar with team work and many of those who were driving had little experience." Myron had great respect and admiration for George A. Smith, and would have made any sacrifice to assist him. The George A. Smith - Ezra T. Benson wagon train reached Salt Lake in October of 1849, and Myron continued his services to George A. Smith by hauling his winter's wood and doing other chores. Hearing that his father was ill with acute rheumatism, Myron hastened to his home in south Cottonwood. John, seventy-two years old and worn with the cares and labors of the past sixteen years, grasped his hand tightly and whispered his thanks. John was already proud of his son, but Myron would live to do greater honor to the name of his beloved father. Soon after his father's death Myron decided to seek his fortune in the gold fields of California. He knew Brigham was opposed to the Saints leaving Utah for the uncertainties of the gold mines, but he secured the approval of George A. Smith and the loan of a team and set out. Seth, Myron's brother, is not mentioned, but from other sources it is known he accompanied Myron. The boys did quite well at the mines; Myron sent George A. Smith $400 in gold to pay for the team, and a substantial token of his esteem. In two and a half years Myron accumulated $1,250 which he later invested in land and livestock in San Bernardino. It is not known how well Seth did. In the course of a year or two, all of the John Tanner family were living in San Bernardino, except John Joshua and Nathan and their families who remained in south Cottonwood, Utah. Myron indicates that they acquired considerable holdings in livestock and land, and he mentions that they did some trading. It would be interesting to know more about the Tanner's activities in San Bernardino, but little information has been found. This was a period of comparative tranquility and little that was newsworthy occurred. Myron was not in San Bernardino in the fall of 1851 when the fort was built, but came in the fall of 1852. The Beswick children -- Myron, Seth, Freeman, and Joseph -- had some sort of cooperative arrangement until 1856, when Seth withdrew and went to San Diego to prospect for coal. In 1855 Myron and Seth came to Salt Lake with a band of horses for sale, where it was reported there was a good market. Horses were in large supply in California where they could be had for little more than rounding them up. But they required "breaking" before they were ready for the market. All the Tanner men were expert horsemen and made money by converting "wild" horses into tame ones. Most of the horses were of the riding variety. Myron soon met a charming girl named Mary Jane Mount who was living at the home of Henry Lawrence. It is well known that President Young was trying hard to keep the Saints from wandering off to California in search of gold and was "often severe towards those who disregarded the counsels of the Church in this matter." After a whirlwind courtship the couple became engaged and Myron visited President Young to gain his permission to marry his sweetheart according to the rules of the Church. This is Myron's account of his visit to the President: President Young became very angry and raked me over the coals in a lively manner and explained to me the unfortunate circumstances of marrying a girl and taking her off to California to live. This rebuff was too much for me and I saw that President Young was not at all likely to yield, or to be in the least indulgent. My first thought was to turn to George A., for I never had a truer friend than he. His intercession in my behalf not only brought about the desired results, but brought me good counsel through which I made up my mind to leave California as soon as I could close out my interests there. Miss Mount promised to await my return to Salt Lake, and on my return in 1856, we were married on the 26th day of May. Myron's trip to California in the fall of 1855 did not settle his financial affairs in San Bernardino; it would take a number of years before final settlement would be made. But with his marriage he followed through on his determination to settle in Utah and chose Payson as his new home. With the final settlement of the San Bernardino holdings, some exchanges were made for property in Provo and Myron and Jane readily grasped the opportunity to accept the Provo property as Myron's share of the cooperative holdings. In 1860 they moved to Provo, leaving the Payson property to his brothers Freeman and Joseph. Among the various properties he owned while in Provo, a gristmill was probably his most important asset. "When the mining excitement broke out in Montana, the demand for flour brought that commodity up to $25 a sack." This was the time of his greatest prosperity. Myron never gave up his farm when he turned his attention to industrial pursuits, in fact he acquired even more land, but the farm was never his chief source of income. Myron had been in Provo only two years when he was first elected to the City Council, a position he was to hold a total of twenty years. In 1864 he was made bishop of the Provo Third Ward and held that position for twenty-seven years until 1891. The circumstances of this appointment are of interest. Speaking of this he said: "I was in Salt Lake at the time and knew nothing of it. Brother George A. met with the ward, and asked if they would sustain me, and the vote was unanimous. On my return home the news was broken by a neighbor, a Jew by the name of Ben Backman. Learning that I was coming home he came out about four blocks to meet me and greeted me with my new title, 'Bishop.' I was never more surprised in my life and was, perhaps never more severely tried. For three days I did not venture down town. Of all positions I considered that of Bishop in the church most undesirable." Provo was full of rough people, and was probably the toughest town in the territory at that time. "Many of the neighbors ridiculed religion and made the bishop often the butt of their ridicule." Being a bishop in Provo was a most difficult position to fill. It would be exciting if one could say that he brought about an immediate reformation and changed the place into an ideal Latter-day Saint community. Such was not the case; it was a slow and painful process. But when he retired as bishop, he knew that he had left the place much better than he found it. In 1866 Myron married his second wife, Ann Crosby, and brought her to his home. Mary Jane had been prepared for the event, but no amount of preparation or religious indoctrination, can prevent a deep hurt in the soul of a woman when she is called upon to share her husband with another. The new wife was brought to their home where she lived for some time until a new and more commodious house was completed, whereupon the new home was given to Mary Jane and the old one became the property of Ann, the second wife. As if he did not already have sufficient problems, Myron generously provided means to bring a number of Ann's destitute relatives from England, and upon their arrival in Utah, they took up their abode with Ann. Jane's journal is most candid about how she felt: It was a sad day for him [Myron] when they came. Her sister was soon married to Isaak Higbee, but her mother continued to live with her. They had not been there long before they commenced sowing dissention in the family which increased until all intercourse between the two houses ceased. Myron struggled bravely to make a happy life in spite of insurmountable obstacles. It is doubtful he was either the best or the worst of Mormon polygamists. Looking back upon the experience, Jane stated that she believed she and Ann could have made a go of it if Ann's family had not come to drive a wedge between them. There is little doubt that Jane and Ann and Myron all tried hard to be reasonable under circumstances which made reason difficult, but both families turned out well and both wives raised notable sons and daughters. He served honorably for 27 years as bishop of a rough frontier community. At the time of his death Myron Tanner had served 15 years as Selectman for Utah County. He had been a member of the Brigham Young Academy Board of Trustees since its organization, down to about the year 1896. At the time of his death was the only director among the original incorporators of the Provo Woolen Mills, he having served as director of the Mills from the date of their organization to the time of his death. He was also a member of the board of the Co-op store of Provo, and for more than 25 years he served in the City Council. His seventeen children, nine by Mary Jane and eight by Ann, sounds like a very large family, but it is only an average in size when compared with his brothers and the one sister who came West. The number of early deaths -- seven -- is also about average.

Tanner, N. Eldon

Tanner, N. Eldon
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Eldon and Sara Tanner

Board of Trustees, 1962 to 1982. Nathan Eldon Tanner was born on 9 May 1898 in Salt Lake City, the first of eight children born to Nathan William Tanner and Sarah Edna Brown Tanner, Utahns who had gone to Canada by covered wagon to homestead in Aetna, a tiny settlement near Cardston. His childhood was happy but filled with many responsibilities. As the eldest of eight children, he was expected to help on the farm and was often given responsibilities in the care of his younger brothers and sisters. On one occasion, the entire family was ill with smallpox. For three days and two nights he had no sleep as he tenderly cared for the sick. “An event that happened when he was about fifteen,” wrote President Hugh B. Brown, “is indicative of his character. He was thrown from his horse while herding cattle. When he got to his feet, he discovered that three fingers on his left hand were broken at the knuckle joints and were twisted back against his hand, with the bones of the middle finger protruding through the flesh. With characteristic pluck he grasped his fingers, straightened them, remounted his horse, and rode to a doctor, who marveled at the boy’s spunk. The bones were all correctly in place, and the doctor had only to stitch up the flesh.” (Ensign, Nov. 1972, p. 14.) Such spunk was doubtless responsible for many of his life’s successes. Determined to obtain an education despite heavy responsibilities on the farm, he completed nine grades of schooling in Aetna, attended high school in Cardston, a night academy in Raymond, and later the Calgary Normal School. In 1919, his first teaching position was combined with administration when he became principal of a three-room school at Hill Spring. Here he met and fell in love with one of the teachers at the school, Sara Isabelle Merrill. They were married on 20 December 1919; when the Alberta Temple was dedicated in 1923, they were among the first couples to be endowed and sealed for eternity. With a growing young family, Eldon supplemented his teaching income by running a general store in Hill Spring; he also served as a health officer and participated actively in the community. In 1929 the family moved to Cardston, where he was asked to be principal of a public school and serve on the town council. Heber G. Wolsey, former managing director of the Church Public Communications Department, was a student in that Cardston school where “Mr. Tanner” was principal and eighth grade teacher. On the first day of class, Brother Wolsey recalls, the young educator entered the classroom and said, “Boys and girls, we’ll be together for seven hours a day for the next year. In that time I only want to teach you one thing.” And then he walked to the board and wrote, in two-foot-high letters, THINK!” “To supplement his teaching salary,” wrote Sister Tanner, “he sold suits and insurance, milked cows, raised chickens and a vegetable garden. When he was elected to the Alberta Legislature in 1935, in the first Social Credit Government, he was chosen as Speaker of the House. He had never even attended a session of legislature, and was now to act as chairman of that august body of sixty-three members. We were given an elegant suite of rooms in the legislative buildings, to use as we liked, and … it seemed that he had fallen into the ‘lap of the Gods,’ but only he and I knew the hours, day and night, that he spent studying parliamentary procedure. This was the beginning of jobs which he was given, which he said were far beyond his ability to cope with. He has always had favorite sayings and slogans. One was: ‘The heights by great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight; but they, while their companions slept, were toiling upwards in the night.’ And he tried to accomplish what he set out to do by doing just that: By rising at five A.M. to teach himself typing when he was running the store in Hill Spring; by searching the scriptures at the same hour when he was made bishop and later called to the General Authorities of the Church.” Eldon’s perseverance and stability made him a valued asset in both governmental and ecclesiastical circles. In 1936 he was appointed Minister of Lands and Mines in the Provincial Cabinet, a position which was later expanded to include two departments—Mines and Minerals, and Lands and Forests. In this capacity he sponsored legislation to govern development of natural resources, especially petroleum, which became the pattern for other Canadian provinces to follow and helped to make Alberta the first province free from public debt. While acting as Minister in the Alberta government, he earned the well-deserved nickname of “Mr. Integrity” because he refused to compromise by accepting gifts of any kind and was strictly honest in his dealings. That affectionate title followed him through a lifetime of success based on principles of fairness and integrity. After sixteen years of distinguished government service, Eldon Tanner turned his energies to industry, serving first as president of Merrill Petroleum, Ltd., and director of the Toronto Dominion Bank of Canada. In 1954, answering an appeal from government officials, he agreed to become president of Trans-Canada Pipelines, Ltd., and direct construction of a $350 million, 2,000-mile pipeline across Canada from Alberta to Montreal. Upon completion of the project one authority observed, “It was the greatest undertaking since the building of the transcontinental railroad and was accomplished in less than four years.” Overshadowing his governmental and business concerns were always the two most important interests of this remarkable man’s life: family and the gospel. He and Sara reared five daughters. Twenty-four grandchildren and fifty great-grandchildren have also joined the family. Helen Tanner Beaton remembered her father as a warm, compassionate man who cared deeply about his family: “Daddy was branch president in Edmonton, Cabinet Minister in charge of two major government departments, and president of the Boy Scout Association. But he still got up with us in the night if we were sick, prepared breakfast every morning, and set up the washing machine and rinse tubs every Monday morning at 6:00 A.M. If we were new babies, he would get up and bring us to mother and then he would take us back to bed. He did that for five girls.” For many years of his life in Canada, President Tanner was deeply involved in Scouting as a member of the Canadian Scout Committee and as Provincial Scout Commissioner. He received the Silver Acorn and the Silver Wolf awards, the latter being the highest honor given to a Scouter in Canada. Yet he never lost sight of the young people themselves. Once when asked why he was interested in the Boy Scouts when he had no sons, he replied, “Well, I want to help boys to be worthy of my daughters.” From his youngest years, Eldon Tanner was committed to Church service. In 1932 he became counselor to a bishop in Cardston; two years later he was made bishop of the Cardston First Ward. He became president of the Edmonton Branch in 1938, was later called to the high council in the Lethbridge Stake, and in 1953 became the first president of the Calgary Stake, which office he held until his call as an assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve in 1960. “The Calgary Stake was standing first in the Church,” recalls Sister Tanner, “and now with the pipeline behind him it looked as though everything was just going to be easy. We built our new home, moving into it in May of 1960. On October 8, 1960, President David O.McKay called him in as a General Authority of the Church, which made all of his other accomplishments seem trivial and unimportant. “Now, indeed, he felt inadequate. None of his past seemed to have prepared him for this tremendous task. True, he had been bishop for six years and a branch president for fifteen, and a stake president for seven years, but this work had been principally administrative. He felt that his knowledge of the scriptures was scanty; his public speaking had been mostly on political and technical lines. “His … appointment to the Quorum of the Twelve made him feel even more humble. However, I personally feel that all his past life led up to this point. Every decision, small and great, that he has made has been prayerfully considered with the Church in mind.” The Tanners moved to Salt Lake City on 1 February 1961. As they made plans to furnish their newly purchased home, Eldon Tanner was called to accompany President McKay and President Hugh B. Brown to London to attend the dedication of the new Hyde Park Chapel. Four days later, Elder Tanner was asked to prepare to remain in London as president of the West European Mission. Soon after he became a member of the Quorum of the Twelve in October 1962, Elder Tanner was appointed president of the Genealogical Society of the Church, in which assignment he served enthusiastically until his call to the First Presidency in October 1963. At the death of President McKay in January 1970, he was named Second Counselor to President Joseph Fielding Smith. Following President Smith’s death in July 1972, he became First Counselor to President Harold B. Lee. President Lee’s death in December 1973 brought Spencer W. Kimball to the presidency; President Tanner was sustained as his First Counselor. Part of his devotion to community included becoming a citizen of the United States, which he did on 2 May, 1966. Questioned later about the seeming “desertion” of his native Canada, his response was that “we have responsibilities to the community in which we live. In order to fulfill our obligations, we need to be practicing citizens of the nation which shelters us.” President Tanner’s sense of community complemented his service as a General Authority. He was a member of the Salt Lake Area Chamber of Commerce and the Salt Lake Rotary Club, a member of the boards of directors of several Utah corporations, and vice president of the Board of Trustees of Brigham Young University and the Church Educational System. In 1978 his integrity and accomplishments were cited by the Salt Lake Area Chamber of Commerce, which saluted him as “a man of superior character, a successful businessman with deep spirituality, a great leader esteemed by millions of people around the world.” He died in 1982.

Tanner, Nettie

Tanner, Nettie
Of Payson, Utah US

Nettie Tanner

Class of 1912. Nettie Tanner, of Payson, Utah. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1912. Source: 1912 BYU Mizpah, BYH section, photos and names on pp. 1 - 62, 105.

Tanner, Patricia Ann
PO Box 712161
Salt Lake City, Utah 84171-2161

Pat Germann

Class of 1951. Senior Class Social Chair. French Club, Fauvines, Graduation Committee. @2001

Tanner, Robert Leigh

Tanner, Robert Leigh
Palo Alto, CA US

Robert Tanner

Class of 1940. Robert L. Tanner. Opera. Boys' Organization. Wildcat Yearbook Staff. ~ ~ ~ ~ Robert L. Tanner is found in the 1940 Census of Provo, Utah, age 18, born in Utah circa 1922. The Tanner household consisted of Robert's mother, Orea B. Tanner, age 44, and her three sons: Champ B. Tanner, 19; Robert L. Tanner, 18; and Bruce M. Tanner, 15 [BYH Class of 1942~H]. The mother and all three sons were born in Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Robert's mother, Orea Bean Tanner, was born June 6, 1894 in Utah. Her parents were James W. Bean and Olive S. Bean. Orea Bean of Teton, Idaho, married Bertrand Myron Tanner, a young cement contractor of Idaho Falls, Idaho, on October 24, 1919 in Fremont County, Idaho. Bertrand was born on January 29, 1895 in Provo, Utah, and died on December 5, 1924 in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Orea B. Tanner moved her family of three sons to Provo, Utah, where the boys attended school. Orea Bean Tanner died on January 19, 1981 in Santa Clara, California. ~ ~ ~ ~ Robert Leigh Tanner died from injuries received in a sailplane accident. The sailplane, Schweizer SGS 1-26B crashed on June 4, 1990 at Truckee, California. The glider was owned by David Soom, and operated by student glider pilot, Robert L. Tanner. According to the crash account, the student glider pilot released from the tow airplane without communicating with the tow pilot. The glider proceeded in a northeast direction toward the lee side of the mountains. The surface wind was from the southwest. The glider was observed at a low altitude disappearing over a ridge. The aircraft struck a 50-foot tree about 10 feet from the top, then collided with the ground. Source. ~ ~ ~ ~ Author: Robert Leigh Tanner wrote his Ph.D. Thesis at the Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford, University, titled, "Radio Interference From Corona Discharges" in 1953. ~ ~ ~ ~ Robert Leigh Tanner A.B. 1944, M.A. 1947 Stanford. ~ ~ Antenna Patent (Robert L. Tanner) 1966

Tanner, Sadie

Tanner, Sadie

Sadie Tanner

BY Academy High School Class of 1886. Sadie Tanner. Awarded Assistant Teacher's Certificate. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 25, 1886.

Tanner, V Jordan
1929 North 1420 West
Provo, Utah 84604 US

Jordan and Pat Tanner
  • Cell: 801-367-5266
  • Home: 801-377-1876

Brigham Young Academy Foundation Member. BYH Class of 1950 ~ Honorary. V Jordan Tanner. Jordan Tanner attended both the BY Training School and BY Junior High School, leaving after the 9th grade. He then graduated from Provo High School in 1950. He graduated from the University of Utah in 1954 and received his Commission as an Ensign and served as the Signal Officer on the USS Hornet, CVA-12 for two years. After his Navy days he received an MBA from the University of California (Berkeley). He passed the exams for the Foreign Service and served in Embassies in Korea, Indonesia, Pakistan, South Africa and Australia. He was elected to Utah House of Representatives in 1990 and served five terms. He sponsored legislation in 1994 that prevented smoking in all public buildings in Utah. It was the first statewide ban implemented in the United States. He also sponsored several ethics reform bills during the ten years he was a legislator. He was serving in the legislature during the final and successful effort to save the historic Academy Building, and was named an honorary member of the Brigham Young Academy Foundation. He has done contract work with the Department of State for the past twenty years, working on International Visitors Leadership Projects. He has been an Adjunct Professional at the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies at BYU for 21 years and was appointed to the Provo City Energy Board in 2009. ~ ~ ~ ~ FAMILY: Parents: Professor Vasco Myron Tanner (born October 29, 1892 in Payson, Utah) and Annie Atkin Tanner (born December 14, 1891). Vasco and Annie married on June 5, 1917. The children of Vasco and Annie Tanner included: Carol Tanner, married Leo Evan Smith; Marilyn Tanner, married Edward Smith Murphy; Carmela Dawn Tanner, married David Pond Forsyth; Gloria Tanner, married Maurice Smith; and V Jordan Tanner [BYH Class of 1950~H], married Pat Nowell. [Special note: We are informed by Jordan Tanner that the initial V in his name is not an abbreviation, hence no period follows it.] @2009

Tanner, Vasco Myron

Tanner, Vasco Myron
Provo, Utah US

Vasco and Annie Tanner

Attended BYHS about 1910-1911 ~ Honorary. Dr. Vasco Myron Tanner. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1915. Vasco M. Tanner. He received an AB Degree in 1915. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 6, page 85. ~ ~ ~ ~ Vasco Myron Tanner was the son of John Myron and Lois Ann Stevens Tanner, was born October 29, 1892, at Payson, Utah. He has the distinction of being the oldest child of his parents and the oldest grandchild of his grandparents. His boyhood was spent in Indianola and Fairview. He graduated from the eighth grade in Fairview in 1909. He attended Brigham Young High School briefly and then finished his high school work at Mt. Pleasant in 1912. His A.B. degree was obtained from Brigham Young University in 1915, his M.A. from the University of Utah in 1920, and his Ph.D degree from Stanford University in 1925. During this busy period of gaining an education, he courted a St. George school girl, Annie Atkin [BYH Class of 1916]. They were married in the St. George Temple, June 5, 1917. Their family consists of four girls and one boy; Carol, Gloria, Marilyn, Carmela, and V Jordan. Vasco Tanner taught a number of years at Dixie College in St. George (1916-23), and was appointed chairman of the Department of Zoology and Entomology at Brigham Young University in 1925. He has taught at Brigham Young University since -- almost a half century of service to that institution. Students trained by Dr. Vasco M. Tanner are to be found in most of the fifty states and in a number of foreign countries, and the department he built up at Brigham Young University is favorably known everywhere. Vasco has not confined his work to research and teaching, however. His activities have reached into such fields as wild life and wise use of natural resources, state parks and recreation, fisheries, city planning and city utilities, and national forests. He spent one term in the state legislature (1962-64), was a member of Chamber of Commerce committee of Provo for thirty years, and took an active part on the boards of health and hospital boards in the city. There were many more activities but space will not permit enumeration. Honors came to him in an ever increasing stream as the years passed. In 1959 he was given the Distinguished Service Award, Utah Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters. This was followed by being made a Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society of London. The James E. Talmage Scientific Award was bestowed on him in 1968. There were many such honors. ____________________ Tanner, Vasco (1892-____) Thamnophis elegans vascotanneri Tanner and Lowe, 1989 --1892 Born October 29, Payson Utah. --1909 Graduated Fairview School, attended Brigham Young High School --1912 Finished H.S. at Mount Pleasant --1915 AB, Brigham Young University --1917 Married Annie Atkin June 5 with whom he would have Carol, Gloria, Marilyn, Carmela, and V Jordan. --1916-1923 Taught at Dixie College in St. George. --1920 MA, University of Utah --1925 Chairman of Zoology and Entomology, Brigham Young University where he served for nearly 50 years --1926 Ph.D., Stanford. --1962-1964 One term in Utah state legislature --He was a member of Chamber of Commerce committee of Provo for thirty years, and took an active part on the boards of health and hospital boards in the city. J.N. Stuart ~ ~ ~ ~ Vasco Myron Tanner was born on October 29, 1892 in Payson, Utah. His parents were John Myron Tanner and Lois Ann Stevens. He married Annie Atkin on June 5, 1917 in St. George, Utah. He died on April 25, 1989 in Provo, Utah. Interment, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ FAMILY: Professor Vasco Myron Tanner (born October 29, 1892 in Payson, Utah) and Annie Atkin Tanner (born December 14, 1891). Vasco and Annie married on June 5, 1917. The children of Vasco and Annie Tanner included: Carol Tanner, married Leo Evan Smith; Marilyn Tanner, married Edward Smith Murphy; Carmela Dawn Tanner, married David Pond Forsyth; Gloria Tanner, married Maurice Smith; and V Jordan Tanner, married Pat Nowell.

Tate, Barbara
3655 Gramercy Ave
Ogden, Utah 84403-1917 US

Barbara and Dennis Bednarik
  • Work: (801) 394-5905
  • Home: (801) 394-2698

Class of 1960. Barbara Tate. F.H.A., Chorus, Forensics, Interpretive, Poetry Contest, Seminary Graduate. BYU BS Teacher Education 1965. Married Dennis F. Bednarik, seven children. Occupation, Teacher, Elementary and Special Education. Alternate Address: Barbara T. Bednarik, PO Box 150284, Ogden, Utah 84415 - (801) 394-2698 @2010

Tatton, Wallace

Tatton, Wallace
Provo, Utah US

Wallace Tatton

BYH Class of 1924 ~ Honorary. Wallace Tatton of Provo, Utah. Wallace was listed as a 3rd Year (junior) student at Brigham Young High School. Other students similarly listed were actually 4th Year (senior) students. Background sources: BYU/BYH Annual Catalogues for the School Years 1923-24, 1924-25, and 1925-26.

Taylor, Ada R.

Taylor, Ada R.

Ada Taylor

Brigham Young High School, Class of 1906. Ada Taylor. She received a Normal Diploma. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B.Y. Academy, Book 2, Page 62. ~ ~ ~ ~ BYH Class of 1906. Ada R. Taylor, a Normal graduate. BYU [& BYH] Class of 1906 Listing of BYH Normal, High School, Commercial, and Music School graduates. Source: Brigham Young Academy & Normal Training School, Catalogues & Announcements, for 31st Academic Year, 1906-1907, p. 140.

Taylor, Adrianne
3709 Hillwood Way
Bedford, Texas 76021-2532 US

Adrianne and Rodney Taylor
  • Work: (817) 571-1601

Class of 1954. Adrianne Taylor. Band, Girls State, Girls Nation, Shorthand Club, Scholastic Award, Supreme Court, Type Team, Graduation Committee. BYU 1958. Married Rodney S. Taylor. Note: Her marriage did not result in a change of surname. See related website.

Taylor, Afton
3455 Hillcrest St.
Redding, California 96001-3421 US

Afton Blurton
  • Work: (530) 241-0883

Class of 1944. Afton Taylor. Her parents: Argle Lee Taylor and Hannah V. Sackett Taylor. She married _____ Blurton. [Blurton is spelled correctly.] [?Married Charles L. Blurton, born March 17, 1920, and died January 23, 200l, Redding, California?]. Email updated. @2010

Taylor, Aimie Richards

Taylor, Aimie Richards
Provo, Utah US

Aimie and Frederick Finlayson

BYH Classes of 1910 and 1912. Aimie Taylor. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1910, in the High School Department. She served as Second Vice-President of the Senior Class of 1910. Source: 1910 BYU Banyan, BYH section, list on p. 83, also p. 78. ~ ~ ~ ~ Aimie R. Taylor. She received a BYH Art & Manual Training Diploma in 1912. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 3, page 408. ~ ~ ~ ~ Aimie Richards Taylor was born on June 9, 1889 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her parents were Frederick Whitaker Taylor and Amelia Richards. She married Frederick [Fredrick] Lloyd Finlayson on October 11, 1912 in Provo, Utah. Aimie Taylor Finlayson died on July 6, 1963 in Provo, Utah. Internment, Provo, Utah.

Taylor, Albert R.

Taylor, Albert R.

Albert Taylor

Class of 1917. Albert R. Taylor. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1917. Source 1: 1917 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, pages 82-88. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1917. Albert R. Taylor. He received a High School Diploma in 1917. Source 2: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 8, page 324.

Taylor, Alice Louise

Taylor, Alice Louise

Alice and ElRoy Nelson

Class of 1919. Alice Louise Taylor. She graduated from BYH in College Hall on Wednesday, May 28, 1919. Source 1: 1919 Graduation Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1919. Alice Taylor. Source 2: 1919 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, pages 61-74. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1919. Alice Taylor. She received two BYH diplomas in 1919: a BYH Academic Diploma, and a BYH Business Diploma. Source: Annual Report, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 182. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1923. Alice Taylor. She received an AB Degree in French in 1923. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 198. ~ ~ ~ ~ Alice married ElRoy Nelson. Her parents: Arthur Nicholls Taylor and Maria Louise Dixon Taylor. Their children: Arthur Dixon Taylor, BYH Class of 1915; Elton L. Taylor, BYH Class of 1918; Alice Taylor (Nelson), BYH Class of 1919; Henry Dixon Taylor, Sr., BYH Class of 1921; Clarence D. Taylor; and Ruth Elaine Taylor (Kartchner). ~~~~OBITUARY: Alice Louise Taylor Nelson, age 95, died March 12, 2002 in Salt Lake City. She was born November 18, 1906 in Provo, Utah, the fifth child of Arthur Nichols Taylor and Maria Louise Dixon. She was known for her charitable service to friends and neighbors who were the recipients of homemade bread and cinnamon rolls. Family and friends cherish her water color and oil paintings. After graduation from Brigham Young High School in 1919, she attended Brigham Young University, graduating in 1929 with a BA in Art. During her student years she was a member of O.S. Social Unit, served as secretary-treasurer of the junior class and as student body secretary-historian. She married a classmate, ElRoy Nelson, August 14, 1935 in the Salt Lake Temple. She has resided in Troy, New York; Denver, Colorado; Salt Lake City, Provo and Riverton, Utah. She served in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in numerous teaching capacities including pioneering the guide patrol program in Primary. Service in the Yale Ward, Salt Lake City, included Primary president and Relief Society president. For several years she volunteered at the Primary Children's Hospital in the pre-school for blind children. She was a member of the Daughters of Utah Pioneers and the Classics Club. She is survived by a brother and sister, Clarence Taylor and Ruth Kartchner, of Provo and sister-in-law, Ethelyn Taylor, of Salt Lake City; children, Arthur T. (Bonnie) Nelson, John C. (Mary Ann) Nelson, Christina L. (Ron) Preston, Henry A. (Kristy) Nelson, James N. (Connie) Nelson; 22 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. A funeral service was Saturday, March 16, 2002 in Sandy, Utah. Interment, Provo City Cemetery. [Deseret News, Thursday, March 14, 2002]

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