Alphabetical Alumni

Knight, Maxine

Maxine Knight

Faculty & Staff Early 1960s, including 1963-64 - Business Education Teacher.

Knight, Newell Boyd
9231 S Tanya Avenue
West Jordan, Utah 84088-8531 US

Newell and Kathy Knight
  • Home: 801-565-1457

BYH Class of 1960 ~ Honorary. Newell Boyd Knight. Newell is a great-grandson of Jesse Knight, often known as “Uncle Jesse” who was known as one of the the "patron saints” of Brigham Young Academy and BYU because of his major contributions in cash and wisdom. "I attended BY High and I am writing a detailed book about the history of Jesse Knight. The stories on the BYH website bring back memories of the girls I wanted to date but was to shy to pursue. For the record, Richard "Dick" Knight, who graduated in the BYH Class of 1954, is my older brother. Stan Knight, BYH Class of 1956, is also my older brother. I attended BY High in the 8th, 9th and 10th grades, and made the mistake of transferring to the new Provo High in 1958 when a lot of my associates jumped ship. I am in the BYH yearbook of 1957. I was active in the Ski Club. Some of the BYH teachers who tried to educate me were Don McConkie, Faye Buttle, Anna Boss Hart, Fred Webb and Julia Cain. Memories: I recall getting a cheap hamburger for lunch at the dairy across the street. On one occasion while waiting for a burger a headless chicken came running out of the back room. I am not sure why they were butchering chickens at the dairy but it was entertaining. Sherm Anderson was one you could count on for a laugh in and out of class. Clifford Pierpont refused to dance when we all lined up at Room 250A for forced dance instruction. When I was in the tenth grade the only person in the school as short as me was Billy Mitchel, who was in the 7th grade. Beside being short I looked about like a grade school student. The girls used to tell me how cute I was, then added that they would like to date me when I grew up. To a struggling early teen I didn’t think that was a compliment. But when I finally grew up I was even better looking and it was fun to see the same girls looking a lot older and I still had my youth and could date younger girls who did not suspect my real age. I did in fact marry a darling farm girl who was 8 years younger than me. Kathy and I are still married after 50 years, with six kids and 17 grandkids. The book I am writing about Jesse Knight will be far more detailed than anything that has ever been published. There have been numerous papers published about “Uncle Jesse” and the BYU library has hundreds of papers from his businesses. The difference in my book will be the stories I can tell about exploring some of his mines as a youth and a lot of documents never seen by anyone outside the family. I hope to get the book published by the end of the year. The story of Jesse Knight is not just a story about Jesse, but a history of Provo at the turn of the century." @ August 2019

Knight, Raymond

Knight, Raymond

Ray Knight

Class of 1914. Ray Knight. Graduated in 1914 from Brigham Young High School, Agricultural Department. Source: 1914 BYU Banyan, BYH section, pp. 84-89. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1917. Raymond Knight. He received an AB Degree in 1917. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 6, page 290.

Knight, Reuben Leroy

Knight, Reuben Leroy

Reuben Knight

Class of 1914. Reuben Knight. Graduated in 1914 from Brigham Young High School, Agricultural Department. Source 1: 1914 BYU Banyan, BYH section, pp. 84-89. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1914. Reuben Leroy Knight. He received a BYH Agriculture Diploma in 1914. Source 2: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 6, page 291. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1917. Ruben Leroy Knight. He received an AB Degree in 1917. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 6, page 291.

Knight, Richard S.
4283 S. Hollow Road
Logan, Utah 84321-6329 US

Dick and Ruth Knight
  • Home: 435-245-7994

Class of 1954. Richard S. Knight. Senior Class Social Chair. Chorus, Junior Class Vice President, French Club Vice President, Ski Club President, Debate, Childrens Theater, Thespians. BYU 1958. ~ ~ ~ ~ UPDATE: I graduated from BY High in 1954, attended BYU for two years, then served for two years in the British Mission. I graduated from the University of Utah in 1961 with a major in psychology and a minor in economics. Then I taught at Olympus High School, worked as a social worker in Las Angeles while attending UCLA, then earned a PhD from the University of Michigan in 1972. I was a professor of Education and Psychology at Utah State University in Logan, Cedar City and Roosevelt from 1968 until 2006. I'm married to Ruth Hughes, and we have 3 children who are also teachers, and eight delightful grandchildren. I've had a great career and a wonderful life. @Oct 2017

Knight, Stanley
449 East 650 North
Roosevelt, Utah 84066 US

Stan and Esther Knight
  • Work: 435-722-3382

Class of 1956. Stan "Gunner" Knight. Ski Club, Debate Region, Childrens Theater, Junior Class Vice President, Soph Class Social Chair, French Club, Gun Club Vice President, Thespians, Chorus, Seminary President, Exchange Assembly. Married Esther. Alternate address: PO Box 340, Roosevelt, Utah 84066. ~ ~ ~ ~ Attended BYU – two and one half years – 1956. University of Utah – two years. University of Alaska – one year. Utah State University – one year – 1973. “Slow Learner.” Six children and four step-children. Many work experiences including Paper Boy, Stock Boy, Cherry Picker, Car Parker, Horse Trainer, Fuller Brush Salesman, Psychology Counselor, Real Estate Salesman, and Insurance Inspector. Retired after twenty-five years in the oil field. Activities include raising families, hunting, boating, and fishing – fishing – fishing. Life has been more than a fishing trip. I’ve had a plate full of pleasure and pain; joys and sorrows; happiness and grief. All the things we were sent here to experience! @2006

Knight, Vola Rosa

Knight, Vola Rosa
Washington, Utah

Vola and Glen Bunker

Class of 1934. Vola Knight. Married Glen Bunker. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: St. George, Utah -- Vola Rosa Knight Bunker, age 84, died Friday, February 26, 1999 at her residence in Washington, Utah. She was born October 30, 1915, in Hinckley, Utah, to James Aubrey Knight and Rose Elizabeth Webb Knight. Vola graduated from Brigham Young High School in Provo, Utah in the Class of 1934. She married Glen Edward Bunker on December 18, 1935, in the St. George Temple. He preceded her in death in 1987. Vola and Glen lived in Delta and Garrison, Utah before moving to Washington, Utah in 1986. Vola was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and had served in many callings. Her last callings were that of Temple Worker and Relief Society Secretary. She was a hard worker. Vola enjoyed sewing, gardening, and serving people. Her greatest joy was her children and grandchildren. She is survived by three sons and one daughter, Howard E. (Julie) Bunker and Merrill K.(Karen) Bunker, both of Bountiful, Utah; Dale R. Bunker, Washington, Utah; Shirley (Ray) Howell, Orem, Utah; 17 grandchildren and five great grandchildren; two brothers, Jesse A Knight, Bountiful, Utah and Ralph E. Knight, San Francisco, California; and sister-in-law, Glenna Knight, Salt Lake City, Utah. She is preceded in death by one son, Doyle Glen Bunker; husband, Glen Edward Bunker; parents, three brothers and one sister. Funeral services were held Monday, March 1, 1999 at the Washington LDS 11th Ward Chapel, 650 East Telegraph, Washington. Interment, Washington City Cemetery. Source.

Knowlden, Lucile

Knowlden, Lucile
Ogden, Utah US

Lucile & H. Aldous Dixon

Class of 1912. Lucile Knowlden, of Provo, Utah. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1912. Source 1: 1912 BYU Mizpah, BYH section, photos and names on pp. 1 - 62, 105. ~ ~ ~ ~ Lucile Knowlden. She received a BYH Normal Diploma in 1912. Source 2: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 3, page 284. ~ ~ ~ ~ Lucile Knowlden became the wife of (Rep.) Henry Aldous Dixon, President of Utah State Agricultural College, Augugust 1953 to December 1954. Lucile Knowlden was born in Provo on Dec. 9, 1891. Her father was Robert Edwin Knowlden; her mother, Mable Twelves. Lucile grew up in Provo, attended the Maeser School, Brigham Young University High School, and received her normal degree from Brigham Young University. Lucille married Henry Aldous Dixon on June 2, 1915 in Salt Lake City. She taught for two years at the Timpanogos School before her marriage. The Dixons had four daughters and two sons. Before becoming president of USU, Henry had been superintendent of schools in Provo and President of Weber Junior College from 1920-1924 and 1932-1937, then president of Weber State College from 1937 until 1953. He left the presidency of USU after being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives to the Eighty-fourth, Eighty-fifth, and Eighty-sixth Congresses (January 3, 1955 to January 3, 1961). The Dixons lived in Washington, D.C. for six years before returning to Ogden. Lucile was active in the LDS Church. She was president and a member of the board of directors for the Children's Aid Society, a member of the Acacia Club, and Children's Hour Club. She served as president of Weber College Faculty Women and was a charter member of the Nelke Reading Club of Provo. Lucile loved gardening, growing plants indoors and out. She especially enjoyed African violets and while she lived on campus the university horticulture group regularly brought her fresh flowers. In gathering information for her book on the president's house, Alice Chase learned from Mrs. Dixon that her "heart sank at the prospect of moving into" the president's home. The Dixon's had at that time a new house in Ogden. The president's house had purportedly been neglected and the trustees decided to "recondition" the house rather than build a new house. Despite her initial impressions, Lucile told Alice that "living there proved to be a delightful experience." Lucile Knowlden Dixon died on Dec. 13, 1986 in Ogden. She was 95 years old.

Knowlton, Benjamin Franklin, Jr.

Knowlton, Benjamin Franklin, Jr.
Farmington, Utah US

Frank and Sarah Knowlton

Class of 1884? Benjamin F. Knowlton, Jr.'s wife, Sarah Lavina Clark, grew up a spirited, self-reliant, happy, talented young lady who enjoyed her home life, acquired many domestic skills and intellectual interests, and was held in high esteem by the young people of Farmington. Following in the footsteps of several brothers and sisters, Sarah, at the age of 17, had enrolled at Brigham Young Academy, Provo, Utah, leaving her family for the first time. She attended the school from 1883 to 1884. Besides enjoying the stimulating intellectual and social life at the academy, she met and fell in love with a fellow student, Benjamin Franklin Knowlton Jr. who came from quite a different social environment. They were married in the Logan Temple on April 14, 1886. Although the Benjamin Franklin Knowltons were living in Farmington at this time, they had recently moved from the ranch known as Delle in Skull Valley. Frank, having lost his mother Rhoda Richards Knowlton at the age of 16, grew up among cowmen and frontiersmen whose moral codes and personal behavior patterns differed sharply from those of the Mormon people in Farmington. Frank's father, Benjamin Franklin Knowlton, spent most of his life in the saddle as a rancher, scout and frontiersman. He played an active and courageous role in the Mormon Militia during the Utah War. Settling in Skull Valley to ranch with his older brothers George Washington and John Quincy Knowlton, his family experienced the harsh, primitive, frontier conditions of life on the isolated Skull Valley frontier with few of the cultural, religious or social opportunities common to Farmington. For the first few years of their married life, they lived in Grantsville, Utah. As the ranching business did not prosper, they moved back to Farmington, taking up residence in a house north of the Knowlton farm. Frank farmed and worked at various jobs in and around Farmington without much success. Discouraged by his economic difficulties and the continued deterioration of his relationship with his father, he concluded in 1900 to leave his wife and seven children and try his luck in the Philippine Islands. The American Government was then recruiting American workers for construction projects in the newly-acquired islands. Until 1902, Frank regularly sent home money to support his family. Then without any explanation, the money ceased to arrive. The family was thrown suddenly upon its own resources. After the sudden death of her mother in 1902, Sarah moved her family into her mother's home to live with Laura and Horace, who had not yet married. By taking in boarders and through the labor of family members and some assistance from relatives, the Knowlton family managed to survive. My father and his brother Richard often worked on farms far from home during the summer months, often receiving harsh treatment and minimal wages. As each of the children matured, they were forced to seek employment to sustain the family. Those years were difficult ones for Sarah Clark Knowlton and her family. Although Sarah and her children were active in the Farmington Ward, rumors of Frank's misconduct in the Philippine Islands spread through Farmington in the 1900's, damaging the family's social position in the community. Not hearing from her husband, Sarah secured an uncontested divorce in 1905.

Knowlton, Martha Jane

Knowlton, Martha Jane
Provo, Utah US

Martha Jane & Howard Coray

Board of Trustees, Brigham Young Academy, 1875 to 1882. Martha Jane Knowlton Coray. In the 1870s when Brigham Young envisioned a school combining sacred and secular learning, he selected several educated Saints to lay its foundations. Among those asked to contribute was Martha Jane Knowlton Coray. Martha Jane was born in Kentucky in 1821 to Sidney Algernon and Harriet Burnham Knowlton. The family later moved to Illinois, where in 1840 they heard George A. Smith preach the gospel. Martha led the family in baptism. Her great admiration for the Prophet was later described by her husband, Howard Coray, who wrote, "I have frequently heard her say, that [the Prophet] was the greatest miracle to her she had ever seen; and that she valued her acquaintance with him above everything else." Howard also recorded his first impression of Martha: "I discovered at once that she was ready, off hand, and inclined to be witty; also, that her mind took a wider range than was common for young ladies of her age." The two were married on Feb. 6, 1841. After Howard worked as a clerk for the Prophet, the couple began to teach school in Nauvoo. In January 1846 they received their endowments in the Nauvoo Temple, leaving the city with the Saints that same year. To earn money for the trip to Utah, the couple worked for several years in Iowa, where Howard farmed and Martha tended a ferry. They entered the Salt Lake Valley in 1850. Their daughter, Martha Lewis, recalls her mother's sharp wit during the journey in the following memoir: The gold rush to California was on and many curious people came by asking dozens of annoying questions. One time a man came up to mother with curiosity written on his face, but before he could say anything, she started out rapidly with "I'm David Crockett's aunt. I came from the East and I'm going to the West. I think that man over there died with the small pox." This seemed to suffice his curiosity, for he walked away and without a word. I suppose he wondered what was the matter with mother. Once in Utah, Howard worked as a tithing clerk in Salt Lake City before they moved to Provo in 1857. When her husband homesteaded a ranch in Mona, Juab County, in 1871, Martha continued to reside in Provo in order to fulfill her commitments to the community. She participated in Church activities, including Sunday School and Relief Society functions, and wrote for the Woman's Exponent. She distilled herbs and liniments, marketing her products from Nephi to Ogden. Although most of her products had medicinal value, Martha also produced "Lightning Cage Oil," reputed to be stronger than Hartshorn. A slight whiff would render any assailant helpless, gasping for breath. She held the power of attorney for several court matters, and her journal entries and letters demonstrate her knowledge of the law. Martha's journal also records the commitment she had to the education and personal improvement of her 12 children. She wrote of their progress: "All are studying very hard at arithmetic, every leisure hour. Donny read 6 pages and finished his book. Will and Sid began to study; got 5 parts of speech." And she continued to improve her own mind, writing, "Nellie and George came from the city and brought my books, Walter Scott and Herodotus." As a teacher, Martha often faced the frustrations created by a lack of stability, tuition collection, and a general indifference of the public to education. Financial difficulties also plagued her as she served on the Board of Trustees at Brigham Young Academy. In an editorial published by George Q. Cannon, she complained about the lack of support given to the academy, stating that the school was struggling to accomplish the "greatest good with the smallest means" and that its success was due mainly to an "unflinching trust in God." She finished with a call to "Israel" to pay more attention to how close principles of "faith, honor and a deep desire for general intelligence cling to the scholar even after leaving Brigham Young Academy." Despite these trials, Martha continued to champion educational causes throughout her life. In a letter to Brigham Young, she asked, "Does not the deed require the sacred book mentioned to be taken up as a study in the same way as the sciences mentioned?" She further wrote, "My principle of education has been -- God's laws of religion first -- Man's laws of honor and morality second -- Science of every attainable kind and as much as possible but lastly in forming a permanent base for character and hope of future salvation." The Woman's Exponent eulogized Martha with these words: Very early in life she evinced a character in a degree somewhat rare for one of her sex--that is, of decidedly doing her own thinking; hence, before adopting any principle of religion, law, or politics, whether proposed by father, husband, priest, or king, she must clearly see and understand for herself the righteousness and consistency of the matter. ~~~~ This article is part of an honors thesis written by Amy Reynolds, who graduated from BYU in December 1997. ~~~~ Daughter Mary Coray Roberts was born in 1848 at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, the daughter of Howard and Martha Jane Knowlton Coray. Her family migrated to Utah with the Mormon pioneers in 1850. Her family moved from Salt Lake City to Provo, Utah, ca. 1857. Her mother, Martha Jane Knowleton Coray served on the board of Brigham Young Academy. Orville Clark Roberts was born in 1833, son of Dr. Daniel and Eliza Aldula Clark of Keokuk, Iowa. In 1850, he migrated to Utah with the Mormon pioneers. Mary Coray and Clark Roberts were married in 1868 at Provo, Utah. They had nine children. The family made their first home at Mona, Juab County, Utah, moved to Moncos, Colorado, ca. 1881, and to Jackson, New Mexico, in 1891. After their children were married, Mary and Clark went to live near at daughter at San Diego, California. Clark died there in 1912. Mary returned to Utah to live with a daughter and died at Vernal, Utah, in 1923.

Knudsen, Allen

Allen Knudsen

Class of 1947. Allen Knudsen.

Knudsen, Arthur

Knudsen, Arthur

Arthur Knudsen

Class of 1914. Arthur Knudsen. He received a High School Diploma in 1914. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 6, page 294.

Knudsen, Clarence L.

Knudsen, Clarence L.

Clarence Knudsen

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1927. Clarence L. Knudsen. He received a BS Degree in Physical Education in 1927. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 280.

Knudsen, Farel Emma [not Farrel]

Knudsen, Farel Emma [not Farrel]
Provo, Utah US

Farel and Royal Chamberlain + 2

Class of 1924. Farel Emma Knudsen [not Farrel] of Provo, Utah. She served as Vice-President of the Senior Class of 1924, and graduated with her class. Source: 1924 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section. She continued her education at BYU. Background sources: BYU/BYH Annual Catalogues for the School Years 1923-24, 1924-25, and 1925-26. ~ ~ ~ ~ Farel married Royal Reward Chamberlain. Royal was born of February 3, 1902, in Salt Lake City, Utah. Royal died of August 7, 1951. Royal's parents were Thomas Chamberlain and Mary Elizabeth Wooley Chamberlain. Source. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Farel Knudson Chamberlain Bowman Kimball, age 87, beloved mother, and grandmother, passed away peacefully early on the morning of Sunday, February 14, 1993. . .for a special Valentine reunion with her deeply loved husband, Royal Reward Chamberlain, who preceded her in death by 42 years. The cause of Farel's death was complications incident to age and growing frailty. Bright and lucid to the end of her mortal probation, Farel Kimball was known and loved by all with whom she came in contact. Born November 22, 1906, Farel's life was filled with the joy of living. She and her husband Royal enjoyed many wonderful years together in Central and Southern Utah before moving to Salt Lake City in 1935. Farel's social activities included wide-ranging participation in social clubs, dance groups, BYU alumni activities and, most enjoyable of all, the many traveling opportunities that took her to all parts of the world. She loved to be involved with family, social interaction and travel. Last week she enjoyed the warm sand of Puerto Vallarta with her family. Some of Farel Kimball's fondest memories were of her constant activity in the church. She served in Primary, Young Women and Relief Society presidencies throughout her life, serving as president in several different wards in Utah and California. Farel enjoyed playing her organ at home and was ward organist in several different wards. She loved good music, cultivated the arts, and encouraged her family to do the same. She was firmly committed to the good that cultural arts would provide for the human spirit. Farel Knudson married Royal Reward Chamberlain, June 4, 1925. Royal passed away in 1951. After many lonely years, Farel married Harold I. Bowman, in 1960. Their happy life together included many enjoyable trips to Harold's Jacob Lake Resort in Arizona. After Harold passed away, Farel was courted by long-time friend and team mate of Royal, Eddie Kimball. Their life together included a whole new circle of friends whom she dearly loved and an exciting circle of social activities centered around BYU. After Eddie's passing, Farel looked forward with great anticipation to her reunion with Royal. Farel is survived by four sons and two daughters, Dr. Cloyd R. Chamberlain, San Jose, California; F. Wayne Chamberlain, Salt Lake City, Utah; S. Bryce Chamberlain and K. Douglas Chamberlain, both of Orem, Utah; Renee Dyer and Maryetta Farrer, both of Las Vegas, Nevada. She is also survived by two brothers and one sister, Goldburn Knudson, Provo, Utah; Clifford Knudson, California; Eva McKleskie, Caldwell, Idaho. She is survived by more than 100 grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Farel will be sorely missed, eternally loved and praised for her purity, virtue, her Christian ideals and Christ-like qualities that she instilled in the hearts of all who knew and loved her. Funeral services were held Wednesday, February 17, 1993 in the Riverside Ward, 303 West 3700 North, Provo. Interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery, Utah. [Deseret News, Monday, February 15, 1993]

Knudsen, Furnessia

Knudsen, Furnessia

Furnessia Knudsen

Class of 1917. Furnessia Knudsen. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1917. Source 1: 1917 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, pages 82-88. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1917. Furnessia Knudsen. She received a High School Diploma in 1917. Source 2: B.Y. University, Book 8, page 247.

Knudsen, Harold R.

Knudsen, Harold R.

Harold Knudsen

Class of 1920. Harold Knudsen. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1920. Source 1: 1920 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, page 65-85. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1920. Harold R. Knudsen. He received a High School Diploma in 1920. Source 2: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 30. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1927. Harold R. Knudsen. He received a BS Degree in Agronomy & Animal Husbandry in 1927. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 30.

Knudsen, Hilda L.

Knudsen, Hilda L.

Hilda Knudsen

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1932. Hilda L. Knudsen. She received a BS Degree in Secondary Education in 1932. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 162.

Knudsen, Karen

Knudsen, Karen
2364 Logan Way
Salt Lake City, Utah 84108-2737 US

Karen and Gary Henderson
  • Home: (801) 582-6340

Class of 1960. Karen Knudsen. Student Body Cheerleader. Ski Club, Chorus, Seminary Graduate, Twirler, Quill & Scroll, Wildcat Yearbook, Model U.N., Girls State, Band Majorette, Poetry Contest, Interpretive, Forensics. BYU 1964. Married Gary D. Henderson, BYH Class of 1959. They have ten children. Occupation, Self-Employed as Travel Agent. Seminary Teacher. Her parents: Wesley Floyd Knudsen and Fae Burch Knudsen, married February 17, 1937 in Heber City, Utah. Wes and Fae are the parents of six children: Kent B. Knudsen (Charlotte Smith), Boise, Idaho; Karen Knudsen [BYH Class of 1960] (Gary) Henderson, Blue Springs, Missouri; Kristine Knudsen [BYH Class of 1962] (Newt) Andrus, Orem; Karla Fae Knudsen [BYH Class of 1967] (Thomas) Womble, Alpine, Utah; Kurt W. (Rebecca Clark) Knudsen, Provo; and Knute Burch Knudsen of Park City, Utah [1994]. @2010

Knudsen, Karla Fae
941 East 750 South
( 941 Stonehedge Rd )
Alpine, Utah 84004-1751 US

Karla and Tom Womble
  • Work: (801) 756-8540
  • Cell: (801) 473-5715
  • Home: (801) 756-1447

Class of 1967. Karla Knudsen. Head Cheerleader 1967. French Club, Pep Club, Junior Varsity Cheerleader, Ski Club, Foresics, Junior Prom Queen, Class Vice President as a Junior, Assembly Chair. BYU BA Teacher Education 1971. Married Thomas Womble. Her parents: Wesley Floyd Knudsen and Fae Burch Knudsen, married February 17, 1937 in Heber City, Utah. Wes and Fae are the parents of six children: Kent B. Knudsen (Charlotte Smith), Boise, Idaho; Karen Knudsen [BYH Class of 1960] (Gary) Henderson, Blue Springs, Missouri; Kristine Knudsen [BYH Class of 1962] (Newt) Andrus, Orem; Karla Fae Knudsen [BYH Class of 1967] (Thomas) Womble, Alpine, Utah; Kurt W. (Rebecca Clark) Knudsen, Provo; and Knute Burch Knudsen of Park City, Utah [1994]. ~ ~ ~ ~ Actor Credits: Movie: Over the Line (1993). Role: Professor's Wife. ~ ~ ~ ~ Teacher, Grade 4, Shelley Elementary School, American Fork, Utah. @2007

Knudsen, Knute

Knute Knudsen

Class of 1979. Knute Knudsen.

Knudsen, Kristine

Knudsen, Kristine
571 South Palisades Drive
Orem, Utah 84097-6651 US

Kris and Newt Andrus
  • Home: (801) 224-2226

Class of 1962. Kris Knudsen. Dramatics, Seminary 4th Year, Poetry Festival, Ski Club, Thespians, Model U.N., Y'd World Yearbook, Homeroom Rep, Soph Class Social Chair, Homecoming Queen, J.V. Cheerleader. BYU Family Living 1988. Kristine married Newton W. Andrus, BYH Class of 1960. Parents: Wesley Floyd Knudsen and Fae Burch Knudsen, married February 17, 1937 in Heber City, Utah. Wes and Fae are the parents of six children: Kent B. Knudsen (Charlotte Smith), Boise, Idaho; Karen Knudsen [BYH Class of 1960] (Gary) Henderson, Blue Springs, Missouri; Kristine Knudsen [BYH Class of 1962] (Newt) Andrus, Orem; Karla Fae Knudsen [BYH Class of 1967] (Thomas) Womble, Alpine, Utah; Kurt W. (Rebecca Clark) Knudsen, Provo; and Knute Burch Knudsen of Park City, Utah [1994]. @2010 ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Kristine Knudsen Andrus. 1944-2018. Kristine Knudsen Andrus passed away Sunday, November 11, 2018, surrounded by her family. She died following a battle with cancer. Kris was born in Provo, Utah, January 16, 1944, to Wesley Floyd Knudsen and Fae Burch Knudsen. She was born into a large and supportive family where she learned the traits of kindness and compassion, especially from her mother and grandmother. She was blessed with a naturally cheerful disposition and was always quick to forgive. Kris attended Wasatch Elementary. She graduated from Brigham Young High School in the Class of 1962, where she was a cheerleader and Homecoming Queen, and was on the yearbook staff and ski team. Following high school, Kris studied psychology and family sciences at Brigham Young University. In 1964 Kris married her eternal companion, Newton Warnick Andrus, in the Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Kris and Newt had met in high school and, after marrying, lived in North Carolina, Hawaii, and Pennsylvania while Newt completed his schooling. Their first child, Samuel, was born in 1968. They then moved to Oregon where they had three more children: Scott “Andy,” Amy, and Jonathan. In 1978 they returned to Utah and eventually settled in Orem. Kris served in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints throughout her life. Her callings included stake and ward Young Women’s president, stake Relief Society president at BYU, and other callings in Primary, Scouting, and Relief Society. Kris served as a secretary in the Provo Temple for 5 years and as an ordinance worker in the Provo and Mount Timpanogos Temples for 20 years. In 2003 Newt and Kris served a mission together in Washington, D.C., where they were employment resource specialists. They loved serving and helping the people in the Washington area improve their lives. Kris and Newt also recently served a mission as addiction recovery specialists at BYU. Kris enjoyed volunteering in her community. She served in the PTA while her children were young. She also served at the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival for 20 years. Her favorite things to do were traveling all over the world, gardening, quilting, and walking with her friends. She also loved her grandchildren. She enjoyed attending all of their events and sharing in their accomplishments. Before her death, she expressed disappointment at not being able to be a part of their lives as they grew. She was an excellent hostess and loved family dinners and reunions. She especially enjoyed recent family trips to the Oregon Coast and to Church history sites. Kris is preceded in death by her parents, Wesley Floyd Knudsen and Fae Burch Knudsen, her brother Kent Knudsen and her brother-in-law Tom Womble. She is survived by her husband, Newton Andrus; her children Samuel (Amy) Andrus, Scott “Andy” (Chris) Andrus, Amy (Brooks) Snow, and Jonathan Andrus; and her grandchildren Olivia, Isabel, Caleb, Benjamin, Henry, William, Dylan, Seth, and Phineas Andrus, and Kolby, Bryson, and Claire Snow; her siblings Karen (Gary) Henderson, Karla Womble, Kurt (Rebecca) Knudsen, Knute Knudsen, sister-in-law Charlotte Knudsen, and brother-in-law Joseph (Holly) Andrus; and many nieces and nephews. Kris had a strong testimony of her Savior and the restored gospel of Jesus Christ. She is greatly loved and will be missed by her friends, neighbors, and family. Funeral services will be held Monday, November 19, 2018 at the Sharon Stake Center, 545 South 800 East, Orem, Utah at 11 am. Family and friends may visit, Sunday, November 18, 2018, 5 to 7 pm, at the Sharon Stake Center, and prior to services 9:30 to 10:30 am also at the church. Interment, Provo City Cemetery. Condolences may be shared with the family online at www.walkersanderson.com. [Provo Daily Herald, November 16, 2018]

Knudsen, Milton H.

Knudsen, Milton H.

Milton Knudsen

Collegiate Grad of BYH, Class of 1917. Milton H. Knudsen. He received an AB Degree in Agronomy & Biology in 1917. Source: Annual Report, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 353.

Knudsen, Nels William

Knudsen, Nels William

Nels Knudsen

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1918. Nels William Knudsen. He received an AB Degree in Music in 1918. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 442.

Knudsen, Oral

Knudsen, Oral

Oral Knudsen

Class of 1922. Oral Knudsen. Source: 1922 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section.

Knudsen, Vern Oliver

Knudsen, Vern Oliver
Provo, Utah US

Vern Knudsen

Class of 1912. Vern O. Knudsen, of Provo, Utah. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1912. Source: 1912 BYU Mizpah, BYH section, photos and names on pp. 1 - 62, 105. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1915. Vernie O. Knudsen. Received an AB Degree in 1915. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 5, page 52. ~ ~ ~ ~ Vern Oliver Knudsen became Chancellor of the University of California at Los Angeles from 1959 to 1960. s The Chancellor is UCLA's chief executive officer, overseeing all aspects of UCLA's mission of education, research and service. ~ ~ ~ ~ Knudsen graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1912. He then earned a bachelor's degree from Brigham Young University in 1915. Knudsen then served a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1915 to 1918 in the Northern States Mission, which was headquartered in Chicago. Knudsen then joined the staff of Bell Laboratories where he worked with Harvey Fletcher, who had been one of his professors at BYU. Knudsen received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Chicago in 1922. Knudsen's publications included two seminal books, "Architectural Acoustics," published in 1932, and "Acoustical Designing in Architecture" with Cyril M. Harris, 1950. Vern Knudsen co-founded the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), and served as its president, 1933–35, and the ASA awarded him the Wallace Clement Sabine Medal in 1958 and the Gold Medal in 1967. He was the recipient of the John H. Potts (Gold) Medal from the Audio Engineering Society (AES) in 1964. In 1934, Vern Knudsen was made Dean of the Graduate Division of the Southern Section of the University of California, a post which he held for 24 years and during which time the UCLA Graduate Division increased from 287 to 5160 students. Vern O. Knudsen then served as Chancellor of UCLA from 1959-1960, and a building at UCLA was named in his honor. Source.

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