Alphabetical Alumni
Hiller, Rudolph William

Hiller, Rudolph William
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Rudy and Lucile Hiller

Class of 1929? Rudy Hiller. HIS OBITUARY: Rudolph William Hiller, 87, of Salt Lake City, Utah, returned to his Heavenly Father and many loved ones on February 10, 1997. Rudy was born October 2, 1909 in Leipzig, Germany, the son of Wilhelm Eduard Richard Hiller and Bertha Auguste Boehme. Rudy and his beautiful wife and sweetheart, Lucile Duke were married January 1, 1935. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Salt Lake Temple. They recently celebrated their 62nd wedding anniversary. He was a faithful member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He loved the gospel and had great faith, even "Faith in every Footstep". He served as a Seventy, High Priest, Ward Clerk for many years and Home Teacher. He graduated from BY High School and attended Brigham Young University. He learned his trade from his father, who was an old world craftsman/bookbinder. He carried on this tradition throughout his career as an old world craftsman himself. He was an artist that enjoyed using his hands restoring old books and family Bibles. He also loved creating new designs such as the hand made leather containers for a series of Arnold Friberg Prints and the specialty items he did for the First Presidency of the Church. He loved his wife, family, schnauzers, German automobiles, airplanes and motorcycles. His sense of humor was always intact - even when he wasn't feeling well. He lived his life with integrity in business as well as at home - he will be missed by all who knew and loved him - and Dad, you are loved! Rudy is survived by his wife, Lucile D. Hiller and children: Kenneth R. Hiller and wife Louise, Orem, Utah; Linda L. Hiller Deakins and husband Darwin, Salt Lake; Jeannette Hiller Thompson and husband Larry Barrigada Heights, Guam; Christine Hiller Van Wagoner and husband Michael, Salt Lake City; David K. Hiller, Salt Lake; 28 grandchildren, 28 great- grandchildren. Preceded in death by his son, William Dee Hiller, brother Walter William Hiller and his parents. Services were held Friday, February 14, 1997 at the Imperial 2nd Ward chapel in Salt Lake City. Interment, Wasatch Lawn Cemetery, Salt Lake City. The family suggested donations to the Primary Children's Medical Center. [Deseret News, Wednesday, February 12, 1997.]

Hiller, Walter William

Hiller, Walter William
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Walter and Audrey Hiller

Class of 1927. Walter Hiller. Walter is pictured with the BYH Class of 1927 in the BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Walter William Hiller, age 85, passed away on Wednesday, June 16, 1993 in the LDS Hospital from respiratory complications following cancer surgery. Walter was born in Leipzig, Germany, the son of William Richard Edward Hiller and Bertha Auguste Boehme. He graduated from Brigham Young High School, and then from BYU with a Bachelor of Arts degree. His marriage to his first wife, Audrey Jackson [BYH Class of 1927], was solemnized in the Salt Lake Temple on June 14, 1933. She preceded him in death in 1961. There were six children born to this marriage. On November 5, 1962 he married Annie Olson in the Logan LDS Temple. Walter operated the Hiller Bookbinding Company until 1982 when he retired and with his wife, served a mission to the Austria Vienna Mission. Other church service includes two stake missions, various ward and stake assignments, Temple Square Guide for many years and was currently serving in the LDS Member Locating Department. He was survived by his wife Annie and six children: Walter W. Hiller, Jr. (Joan Chapman); Henriette H. Haworth (Robert H.); Melvin Jackson Hiller (Lyn Packer); Irene H. Johnston (N. Paul); Evelyn Hoen (John M.); Karl Jackson Hiller (Debbie Christensen); also survived by his brother Rudolph William Hiller and by 31 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Saturday, June 19, 1993 in the Valley View 8th Ward, 4032 South 2300 East, Salt Lake City. Interment, Wasatch Lawn Mememorial Park. [Deseret News, Thursday, June 17, 1993]

Hillier, David
2108 W Whittonwood Dr
Phoenix, Arizona US

David Hillier

Class of 1966 - Honorary Member. David Hillier. Alternate address: David Hillier, 865 W 1300 S, Hurricane, Utah 84737-2524 - (435) 635-9429 @2006

Hillman, Eugene

Hillman, Eugene

Eugene Hillman

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1922. Eugene Hillman. He received a BS Degree in Chemistry in 1922. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 70.

Hills, Diane Georgia
1455 S. 300 W.
Orem, Utah 84058-7334 US

Diane and Steven Marshall
  • Work: (801) 225-9303

Class of 1963. Diane Georgia Hills. Chorus, Thespians, F.H.A., Hi-Steppers, Pep Club, Seminary Graduate. Married Steven Marshall. --@2005

Hills, William Cree

Hills, William Cree

William Hills

Class of 1919. William Cree Hills. He graduated from BYH in College Hall on Wednesday, May 28, 1919. Source: 1919 Graduation Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1919. William Cree Hills. He received a High School Diploma in 1919. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 194.

Hilton, Eugene

Hilton, Eugene

Eugene Hilton

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1919. Eugene Hilton. He received an AB Degree in 1919. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 4, page 139.

Hilton, Hyrum

Hilton, Hyrum

Hyrum Hilton

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1924. Hyrum Hilton. He received a BS Degree in Education in 1924. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 470.

Hilton, Ianthus R.

Hilton, Ianthus R.

Ianthus Hilton

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1919. Ianthus R. Hilton. He received an AB Degree in Agronomy & Horticulture in 1919. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 8, page 393.

Hilton, Rosalee

Hilton, Rosalee
Spanish Fork, Utah US

Rosalee and Verd Singleton

Class of 1960. Rosalee Hilton. Concert Band, Chorus, Forensics, Interpretive, Thespians, Model U.N., Student Delegate to the Republican Convention, Homeroom Rep., Assistant Art Manager, Seminary Graduate, Spanish Club, Girls State Alternate. Rosalee married Verd Singleton, and they have five children. Occupation, Housewife. Retired from the working world to enjoy children and home. Daughter of Ross C. Hilton, BYH faculty member. Rosalee Hilton Singleton and Verd Singleton had their first great- grandchild in January 2006, making Ross and Valeda Hilton Great- Great- Grandparents for the first time! ~ ~ ~ ~ SPECIAL NOTICE: Rosalee Hilton Singleton passed away after battling a long illness on February 26, 2010. She was married to Verd Singleton for 49 years and was a wife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother. She was able to see her 4th great-grandchild before her passing. She loved sewing, holidays and birthdays and never missed sending cards to her family. She loved her many friends and all the wonderful relationships she developed at BYH. She was always proud to be a Wildcat! ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Rosalee Hilton Singleton, (April 16, 1942- February 26, 2010) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah to Ross C. Hilton [BYH Faculty] and Valeda S. Hilton. She attended schools in Hinckley, Provo, Logan, Tooele and graduated from BY High in Provo in 1960. She was a charter member of the Thespian Club, sang with the choir and with a sextet of friends. She played clarinet in the band, was the Art Manager, and a Student Council Member. She enjoyed music, art, reading, sewing and the beauty of their mountain retreat. She started working at the Barbizon right out of high school, and continued working in the sewing industry until her retirement. She married Elden Verd Singleton on February 5, 1961, in Ely Nevada. They were later sealed in the Manti Temple. They made their home in Benjamin, Utah. Rosalee created many beautiful blessing dresses and tuxedos for her grandchildren. She took pleasure in designing many fashions for her children and grandchildren. She adored her family and devoted her life to their happiness. She loved holidays and birthdays. She was an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and held many positions: Young Women's President, Sunday School teacher, Nursery Leader, and Gospel Doctrine teacher. She especially enjoyed working with the youth. She is survived by her husband, five children; Virginia Lynn (Ginny) and Rod Jones, Ron and Stacey Singleton, Roger and Dianne Singleton, Scott and Alicia Singleton, Phil and Nan Singleton. Parents, Brothers; Glen (Kathy) and Raymond (Julie) Hilton, sister Jeanette (Cal) Nelson, 21 grandchildren, 4 great grandchildren. A viewing will be held at the Walker Mortuary (187 South Main) in Spanish Fork from 6 to 8 pm. on Friday March 5, 2010 and from 9:30-10:30 on Saturday at the Ward Chapel. Funeral services will be held in the Benjamin Ward Chapel (7300 S. 3200 W.) at 11 am on Saturday March 6, 2010. [Provo Daily Herald, March 3, 2010]

Hilton, Ross Cropper

Hilton, Ross Cropper
Cedar City, Utah US

Ross and Valeda Hilton

Faculty & Staff. Ross C. Hilton. Industrial Arts teacher, Cinematographer & Administrator, 1957-1968. He married Valeda. His parents: Roy Parker Hilton and Fannie Lee Hilton, Delta, Utah. Southern Utah University: Ross C. Hilton (1969), Professor Emeritus of Industrial Education. BS 1951 & MS 1965 Utah State University; EdD 1970 University of Northern Colorado. ~ ~ ~ ~ 70th Anniversary: Ross C. Hilton & Valeda S. Hilton. Ross C. Hilton and Valeda S. Hilton were married in the Manti LDS Temple June 9, 1941. They celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary at an open house from on June 11, 2011 at the Cedar City 8th Ward Chapel, 212 W. 200 South, Cedar City, Utah. They have four children, 20 grand-children, 53 great-grand-children, and six great-great-grand-children. They are members of the Cedar City 8th Ward, Cedar City West Stake. [Iron County Today, June 8, 2011) ~ ~ ~ ~ Ross C. Hilton passed away April 20, 2012 at around 3 p.m in Cedar City, Utah. @2012 ~ ~ ~ ~ Ross Cropper Hilton, Husband, Father, Grandfather, Great-Grandfather and Great-Great Grandfather, was born June 5, 1921 in Hinckley Utah. He was almost 91 years old. He passed away peacefully on April 20, 2012 in Cedar City, Utah. He was admired by the community for the service that he rendered, not only to Southern Utah University, but also the LDS Church. Next to family and Church was his love for the Boy Scouts. Ross married Valeda Swensen, also of Hinckley in the Manti Temple on June 9, 1941. Ross started his career in Radar School in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, then on to Mountain Home Air Base, Idaho as a civil service worker. He enlisted in the US Navy in World War II. He obtained degrees from Brigham Young University and Utah State University. He taught Choral Music and Industrial Arts at Tooele High School and at Brigham Young High School in Provo. After receiving his Doctorate Degree in Education, Ross worked as Chairman of the Industrial Arts Department at Southern Utah State College. Ross loved teaching and he taught for 33 years. He loved to sing and was a member of the Master Singers group. Active in the Boy Scouts, Ross received his Silver Beaver and Paramount Service Award. He was co-founder of the Thunder Ridge Boy Scout Camp, taught Wood Badge Courses and loved to portray Lord Baden Powell for the boys. He loved hunting, fishing, lapidary, jewelry making, rock hunting, graphic arts and wood working. He was an avid gardener along with his wife. Ross was member of the Cedar City, Utah, 8th Ward. Ross is survived by Valeda, his high school sweetheart, best friend and eternal companion of almost 71 years, son-in-law Verd Singleton of Benjamin, son Glen (Cathy) of Las Vegas, Raymond (Julie) of Bountiful, Jeanette (Cal) of Las Vegas, 20 grandchildren, 57 great-grandchildren, and 6 great-great grandchildren, sisters Ione Christensen (Jim) and Lula Marie Henricksen. He was preceded in death by his parents, Roy Parker and Fannie Lee Hilton, brothers Harlan and Lawrence, and daughter Rosalee Singleton. Funeral services at the Cedar West Stake Center, 725 South 1100 West, Cedar City, Utah, will start at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 28, 2012. Viewings will be on Friday, April 27, 2012 at Southern Utah Mortuary, 190 North 300 West, Cedar City, Utah from 6 to 8 pm, and prior to the services on Saturday from 9 to 10 am. Interment, Hinckley Utah Cemetery at 3 pm. [Obituary provided by the Hilton family, April 23, 2012]

Hinckley, Arza Alonzo

Hinckley, Arza Alonzo
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Alonzo and Rose Hinckley

BYA HS Class of 1892. Alonzo Hinckley appears in a photograph held by the BYU Archives of "the first class to graduate from the new Academy Building, 1892." (UAP 2 Folder 037) ~ ~ ~ ~ A. Alonzo Hinckley was ordained an apostle on October 11, 1934, by President Heber J. Grant, at age 64. ~ ~ ~ ~ A. Alonzo Hinckley was a merchant, educator, farmer, stock-raiser, LDS stake president for 27 years, legislator, civic official, missionary and mission president. Alonzo Hinckley, president of the California mission, was an able addition to the Council of the Twelve Apostles. His Church activities, his pioneering endeavors and livestock raising brought him recognition througout the west. He was a man of humble and kindly disposition, of sharp intellect, and rare sense of humor. As president of the Millard and Deseret stakes for a total of 27 years, and as president of the California mission, he won a host of followers and associates who wished him happiness and joy in the new position to which he was called. He was born on April 23, 1870, at Cove Fort, Utah. He was a son of Ira Nathaniel Hinckley and Angeline Noble Hinckley, New Englanders who helped pioneer Utah. His ancestry traced back to the early settlers of the American continent, who came to the Atlantic seaboard in 1635. His father was a prominent pioneer and patriot, and his mother was one of the first school teachers in Salt Lake City, having taught in the old First ward, and among her pupils was the mother of Maud Adams, world famed actress. In his boyhood he worked on his father's farm, together with his brothers, one of whom is President Bryant S. Hinckley of Liberty stake. As a boy, at one time, he was herding horses, to keep them off the haylands, and after working for some hours, stopped to rest. Having no place to which he could tie his horse, he looped a line from the horse to his own foot, and lay down to rest. The horse became frightened, and ran away, pulling the boy through brush and rocks, an experience which nearly cost him his life. Reared at Fillmore, his father and mother came to Salt Lake in 1850, but had not met each other at this time. Subsequently, however, Brigham Young called the father to Cove Creek to supervise the building of the fort there. This was in 1867. Three years later, this new apostle was born. His early life was spent in Cove Fort and Fillmore, Millard county, his father having moved to Fillmore when appointed president of Millard Stake in 1877. When but a lad of 14 years, he went to work for his brother-in-law, Lafayette Holbrook, in Frisco, a typical mining town of Beaver county. There he gained a basic training in merchandising which led to the establishment of the Hinckley Co-op, in Hinckley, Utah. As founder of this institution, the name of A. A. Hinckley first became prominent. A graduate of the Fillmore grammar school and an 1892 graduate of Brigham Young Academy high school in Provo, Elder Hinckley taught school for a number of years in Deseret, Millard County. It is interesting that the town of Hinckley, noted as a center of alfalfa seed raising, was named in honor of his father, Ira N. Hinckley. As a dairyman, Elder Hinckley aided his father and carried on his stock-raising interests after his death. At the time he was named an apostle, he owned a dairy farm in Salt Lake County. He also became known in Millard as a successful alfalfa seed grower. He operated and owned three large farms in that county, one in Hinckley, one in Delta, and one in Lyndyll. In 1892 he married Rose May Robison, BYA Class of 1892~Honorary, and lived in Deseret one year before moving to Hinckley, where he made his home. Five years after his marriage he was called to fill a mission to the Netherlands, returning in 1900. Prominent in Church and civic circles in Millard County, he was chosen in 1902 to succeed his father as president of Millard Stake, and he conducted the affairs of this office until the Stake grew to such an extent that it became advisable to divide it, and make two stakes. In 1912 this division was accomplished. The Millard and Deseret stakes were organized, and he became president of the latter one. He served in this position until 1929, at which time he was honorably released after more than 27 years continuous service as a stake president. He then removed to Salt Lake City, making his home on Wall Street, but shortly after coming here he was called to succeed President Joseph W. McMurrin as head of the California mission, with headquarters in Los Angeles. Elder Hinckley served two terms in the legislature representing Millard County, and when Governor Charles R. Mabey was elected he appointed him as State Commissioner of Agriculture. He was retained in this position for some months after the election of Governor George H. Dern. A father of 14 children, 12 of whom were living when he became an apostle, his family was an unusual one. His eldest son, Harold Hinckley, was a practicing physician in Corcoran, California, having graduated from the University of Utah and University of Chicago medical schools, and having fulfilled a mission to New Zealand. Rulon T. Hinckley, the second eldest son, was a graduate of Brigham Young University, and he fulfilled a mission to Germany and returned to teach seminary at Hinckley High School. Arza, the youngest son, served in the Northwestern States mission. Of the daughters, Afton Hinckley Badger of held a master's degree in domestic arts from Brigham Young University. The other daughters, Mabel, Suzanne, Angelina, Ethel, Mary, Nelly, Beulah and Zina all received high school diplomas by the time their father became a member of the Council of the Twelve. Alonzo Hinckley bore a striking resemblance in physical appearance to the late President Anthony W. Ivins, but his career also paralleled that of that distinguished leader in several ways. Both were more or less self-made; both were ardent spreaders of the gospel as missionaries and mission presidents; both were stake presidents, one as the first citizen of St. George Stake, the other as the first citizen of Millard Stake; both led well-balanced lives with a hand in an amazing number of business, economic and industrial ventures; both were outdoor men. [Source: Ancestry, LDS Family History Suite 2, LDS Vital Records Library, Infobases, 1998, Obituary Scrapbook, p. 28] ~ ~ ~ ~ Elder A. Alonzo Hinckley died on December 22, 1936 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery.

Hinckley, Bryant Stringham

Hinckley, Bryant Stringham
Provo, Utah US

Bryant and 4 Hinckley

BY Academy Collegiate Normal Class of 1895, and Collegiate Class of 1897. B. S. Hinckley. Received title of Bachelor of Pedagogy (B. Pd.) on May 23, 1895. Source 1: Salt Lake Tribune, May 24, 1895. ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 2: Class of 1895. B. S. Hinckley appears in a photograph held by the BYU Archives purporting to be "the graduating Class of 1895" (UAP 2 Folder 038). ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 3: B. S. Hinckley, B. Pd. Collegiate Class of 1895: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, page 8. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1897. Bryant Stringham Hinckley. Received the degree of Bachelor of Didactics (B. D.) in May of 1897. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 27, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ Bryant S. Hinckley, Commerce teacher, 1893-1900. ~ ~ ~ ~ According to T. Earl Pardoe, in his book, "Sons of Brigham", "As a gangling youth Bryant was sent to the Brigham Young Academy in Provo. While there the school was moved from the old ZCMI warehouse to the New Education Building on 5th North and Academy Avenue [Jan. 1892]. He had the great privilege of studying and teaching under Karl G. Maeser and graduated from Brigham Young Academy by 1889." He graduated in 1885 and taught through 1889. [Bryant Hinckley appears in a photo of the first faculty to serve under Principal Benjamin Cluff in 1892.] Bryant S. Hinckley came to the campus in 1883. The then-16-year-old Bryant Hinckley, President Gordon B. Hinckley's father, went on to graduate from Brigham Young Academy and was a student orator at his commencement exercises. He joined the faculty and taught at the institution for nine years. In addition, Bryant Hinckley became president of the Alumni Association and organized the Emeritus Club, of which he also served as president.

Hinckley, Caroline

Hinckley, Caroline
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Carol and Tracy Cannon

Class of 1923. Caroline Hinckley. She received a BYH Normal Diploma in 1923. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 254. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Caroline Hinckley Cannon, age 93, passed away peacefully 27 August 1995. She was born 23 January 1902, the daughter of Bryant Stringham Hinckley and Christine Johnson Hinckley. Carol married Tracy Young Cannon on April 19, 1943 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. He died November 6, 1961. Carol was a graduate of Brigham Young Academy, later receiving the BYU Emeritus Club Special Recognition Award. [Note: Brigham Young Academy ceased to exist in 1903; she attended Brigham Young High School.] She was an ordinance worker in the Salt Lake Temple, secretary of the Church Music Committee, and secretary of the Church Correlation Committee. Carol also served as president of her ward Relief Society and served many years on the YWMIA General Board. She was secretary of the McCune School of Music & Art. She is survived by seven children, T. Taylor Cannon (Marjorie), Ogden; Melvin C. Cannon (Anne), Logan; Ralph T. Cannon (Ruth), Salt Lake City; Judith C. Marriott (Woodrow), Washington, D.C.; Frances C. Lee (Wayne), Salt Lake City; Rose Ann C. Gerstner (Dean), Seattle; and Emerson T. Cannon (Wanda), Salt Lake City; two brothers and a sister, President Gordon B. Hinckley, Sherman B. Hinckley, and Ramona Hinckley Sullivan; grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-great-grandchildren; nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Tuesday, 5 Sept. 1995, in the Colonial Hills Ward. Interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery. [Deseret News, Saturday, September 2, 1995]

Hinckley, Edwin Smith

Hinckley, Edwin Smith
Provo, Utah US

Edwin and Addie Hinckley

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891, and Collegiate Class of 1897. Faculty. Edwin Smith Hinckley. Received a high school Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. He was named Class Orator, and spoke in the Commencement Exercises. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1897. Edwin S. Hinckley. Received the degree of Bachelor of Didactics (B. D.) in May of 1897. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 27, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ B. Y. Academy Class of 1900. S. E. (sic) Hinckley. In 1897 at Commencement Exercises, S. E. Hinckley was called upon to deliver a short speech, since he was the president of the Class of 1900 (freshmen) at that time. [Of course, someone else may have been elected president in the following years.] Source: (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 24, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Geology and Education teacher, 1895-1915. Sixth Principal of BY High School from 1904 to 1909. ~ ~ ~ ~ Edwin S. Hinckley was born July 21, 1868, in Cove Fort, Utah, the seventh child of pioneer parents, Ira N. and Adelaide Hinckley. They were known as people of refinement, integrity, religion, family, and education. Edwin S. Hinckley attended Brigham Young Academy in Provo, Utah, and his experiences heightened his interest in higher education. Bryant graduated from BYA high school in 1885 and Edwin in 1886? Edwin was a half brother to Bryant S. Hinckley, and they came to Provo to school together. Edwin married Addie Henry in 1890, and Bryant went on to school in the East and was not married until three years later. Each man remained a teacher and both taught at BYA, Bryant from 1893 to 1900, and Edwin for twenty years. Edwin and his wife Adeline (Addie) Henry Hinckley moved to Ann Arbor, Mich., to pursue additional studies in geology at the University of Michigan; he graduated as class salutatorian. Simultaneously he served a part-time mission. Returning to BYA to teach in 1895, Hinckley served another mission in Colorado. After Brigham Young Academy became BYU in 1903, Hinckley served as Principal of BY High School from 1904 to 1909. For 21 years he inspired students in the classroom, prompting at least one of them, J. Edward Johnson, to write that he "sat as one enchanted all the period he talked to our class, later adding, "One of [his] expressions was, 'Some of you here have it in you to do things which will set waves in motion that will not stop until they break upon the waves of eternity.' "What he taught me in geology has long since ceased to make the slightest difference to me, but the inspiration of his personality and philosophy of life . . . his keen wit and wholesome good humor, continue to fire me with new ambitions." Hinckley, known as the geologist of the university, also served as second counselor, as it was termed then, to BYU president George H. Brimhall. With E.D. Partridge, he laid out the block Y, and was dean of the Church Teachers College. Upon his BYU retirement he served the State Industrial School at Ogden for seven years as superintendent where his management philosophy was "Trust-not punish." He later served as executive director for the Provo City Chamber of Commerce and was a principal participant in major economic development in central Utah. He had served as BYU's Alumni president in 1897 and '98 and continued his affiliation in 1924 and '25 as president a second time. Hinckley died Nov. 15, 1929, leaving a family that included 13 children. In 1954, wanting to express appreciation to their parents, they extended the Hinckley influence by establishing the Edwin Smith Hinckley Scholarship Fund at BYU.

Hinckley, Genie
720 Rose Lane
Los Altos, California 94022 US

Genie and Lynn Bennion
  • Work: (650) 949-1673

Class of 1959. Genie Hinckley [Gene]. Senior Certificate, Y'ld Cat Newspaper, Poetry Speaking Festival, Model U.N. Genie married Lynn Bennion. Genie is a homemaker. --@2005

Hinckley, George Edwin

Hinckley, George Edwin
Salt Lake City, Utah US

George and 2 Hinckley

Class of 1919. George Hinckley graduated from BYH in College Hall on Wednesday, May 28, 1919. Source 1: 1919 Graduation Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1919. George Hinckley. Source 2: 1919 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, pages 61-74. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1919. George E. Hinckley. He received a BYH Academic Diploma in 1919. Source 3: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 354. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1925. George E. Hinckley. He received a BS Degree in Chemistry in 1925. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 354. ~ ~ ~ ~ George Edwin Hinckley was born on January 30, 1901 in Provo, Utah. His parents were Lucian Noble Hinckley and Martha Ada Robison Hinckley. ~ ~ George married twice: first, to Anna Fern Johnson on June 21, 1922 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Anna was born on August 26, 1900 in Provo, Utah. Her parents were Chester Lafayette Johnson and Emma Susan Angell Johnson. Anna died on March 30, 1983 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery, Utah. ~ ~ George E. Hinckley second married Bernice Hughes. Bernice Hughes was born on April 28, 1904 in Spanish Fork, Utah. Her parents were Joseph Hughes and Delila Rebecca Gardner Hughes. Bernice first married Rulon Little Nuttall. She second married George Edwin Hinckley. Bernice Hughes Nuttall Hinckley died on March 29, 1989 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment, Salt Lake City, Utah. George Edwin Hinckley died on January 1, 1989 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His interment, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Hinckley, Gordon Bitner

Hinckley, Gordon Bitner
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Gordon B. & Marjory Hinckley

Board of Trustees, 1961 to present. On January 27, 2008, President Gordon B. Hinckley died at the age of ninety-seven while surrounded by family Salt Lake City. According to a Church spokesman, his death was due to "causes incident to age." President Gordon B. Hinckley, world leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, had been ordained and set apart as the 15th President of the Church on Sunday, March 12, 1995. He had earlier served 14 years as a counselor in the First Presidency, the top governing body of the Church, and as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles for 20 years prior to that. His Church service has been extensive. He was called as a member of the Sunday School General Board in 1937, two years after returning home from missionary service in Great Britain. For 20 years, he directed all Church public communications. In 1951 he was named executive secretary of the General Missionary Committee, managing the entire missionary program of the Church, and served in this capacity for seven years. He was president of the East Millcreek Stake in Salt Lake City when he was called as a General Authority in the capacity of an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles on April 6, 1958. President Hinckley was named to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles on October 5, 1961. On July 23, 1981, he was called into the First Presidency to serve as Counselor and on December 2, 1982, was named Second Counselor to President Spencer W. Kimball. He served as First Counselor to President Ezra Taft Benson from November 1985 to May 30, 1994. On June 5, 1994, he was called as the First Counselor to President Howard W. Hunter. He was also ordained and set apart as the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. As a member of the First Presidency, he has had a major role in administering both the ecclesiastical and temporal affairs of the Church, whose more than 10 million members are spread over some 160 nations and territories. His Church assignments have taken him around the world many times, and he has dedicated more temples than any other leader in the history of the Church. He is the first Church President ever to travel to Spain, where in 1996 he broke ground for a temple in Madrid, and to Africa, where he met with thousands of Latter-day Saints in Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe, and South Africa. President Hinckley was born June 23, 1910, in Salt Lake City, Utah, a son of Bryant Strigham and Ada Bitner Hinckley. His first job was as a newspaper carrier for the Deseret News, a Salt Lake City daily. After attending public schools in Salt Lake City, the future Church leader earned a bachelor of arts degree at the University of Utah and then accepted a call from the Church to spend two years as a full-time missionary in Great Britain. He served with distinction and ultimately was called to be an assistant to the Church Apostle who presided over all the European missions. Upon being released from missionary service in the mid-1930s, he was called by then Church President Heber J. Grant to organize what has become the Church's public affairs program. President Hinckley's major assignments during two decades of service as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles included the supervision of Church units in Asia, Europe, and South America. His Church committee assignments as a general officer have been in such areas as temples, missionary work, welfare services, priesthood, and members in the military service. He also served as chairman of the executive committee for the observance of the Church's 150th anniversary in 1980. In addition to his Church duties, President Hinckley has been active in community and business affairs, serving as chairman and board member of a number of business corporations. In 2004, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civil award, by President George W. Bush. He has been the recipient of a number of educational honors including: the Distinguished Citizen Award, from Southern Utah University; Distinguished Alumni Award, from the University of Utah; and honorary doctorates from Westminster College, Utah State University, University of Utah, Brigham Young University, and Southern Utah University. He has received the Silver Buffalo Award of the Boy Scouts of America and has been honored by the National Conference (formerly the National Conference of Christians and Jews) for his contributions to tolerance and understanding in the world. He has served as chairman of the executive committees of the Board of Trustees of Brigham Young University and of the Church Board of Education. The Church Educational System includes not only Brigham Young University's Utah and Hawaii campuses, but Brigham Young University - Idaho in Rexburg, Idaho, LDS Business College in Salt Lake City, elementary and secondary schools in developing countries, and hundreds of seminaries and institutes of religion serving several hundred thousand high school- and college-age youth. President Hinckley married Marjorie Pay in the Salt Lake Temple in 1937. They have five children. Sister Hinckley passed away 6 April 2004. President Hinckley followed her on January 27, 2008, at the age of 97.

Hinckley, Harold Alonzo

Hinckley, Harold Alonzo

Harold Hinckley

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1929. Harold Alonzo Hinckley. He received an AB Degree in Chemistry in 1929. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 322.

Hinckley, Lenore

Hinckley, Lenore

Lenore Hinckley

Class of 1913. Lenore Hinckley. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1913. Name on list, but no photo. Source: 1913 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, pages 63-81.

Hinckley, Minerva

Hinckley, Minerva
Of Provo, Utah US

Minerva Hinckley

Class of 1912. Minerva Hinckley, of Provo, Utah. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1912. Source 1: 1912 BYU Mizpah, BYH section, photos and names on pp. 1 - 105. ~ ~ ~ ~ Minerva Hinckley. She received a BYH Art & Manual Training Diploma in 1912. Source 2: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 3, page 250.

Hinckley, Robert Henry, Sr.

Hinckley, Robert Henry, Sr.
Eden, Utah US

Bob and Abrelia Hinckley

Class of 1910. Robert H. Hinckley. Robert Henry Hinckley was born June 8, 1891 in Fillmore, Utah. His parents were Edwin Smith Hinckley and Adeline "Addie" Henry Hinckley. He married Abrelia Clarissa Seely on June 23, 1915. He died on April 30, 1988 in Eden, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1916. Robert H. Hinckley. He received an AB Degree in 1916. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 4, page 140. ~ ~ ~ ~ Robert H. Hinckley, Sr. was born in Fillmore, Utah in 1892. He first flew in 1913 with famous aviatrix Melli Beese while in Berlin, Germany. He graduated from Brigham Young University in 1916 and started Pacific Airways in Ogden in 1927. Under his leadership Pacific Airways led the way in a number of innovations in flight, including the air-dropping of supplies to forest-fire fighting crews, and the airborne census of big game. The company also established an outstanding record of 10 years without a fatal accident. In 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Hinckley to the Civil Aeronautics Authority (CAA), the forerunner of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). His first project was to oversee the construction of Washington National Airport in the nation's capital. (Under his leadership the airport was built by 1940, well ahead of schedule and in record time.) In 1939, the President appointed Hinckley Chairman of the CAA and called upon him to make a reality of Hinckley's greatest dream for aviation: an educational base from which aviation could grow. This vision was manifested in the Civilian Pilot Training Program (CPTP). ------ I'd Rather Be Born Lucky Than Rich: The Autobiography of Robert H. Hinckley ------- By Robert H. Hinckley and JoAnn Jacobsen Wells Brigham Young University Press No. 7 Charles Redd Monographs in Western History, 1977 160 pages. By any reckoning, Robert H. Hinckley is a remarkable man. Very few of Utah's native sons have compiled such an outstanding record of service in so many different areas - business, agriculture, education, and perhaps most notably, government service and politics. Certainly his story deserves to be told. Despite the title, a great deal more than mere luck was responsible for Hinckley's successes and his community and his country have been richer for his contributions. This volume recounts Hinckley's origins from Mormon pioneer stock in central Utah, his early life in Provo and education at Brigham Young High School, and his courtship and marriage of Abrelia Clarissa Seely. He served a mission to Germany (where he met another young Utahn named Marriner Eccles), taught in North Sanpete High School, opened an automobile dealership, and was elected to the state legislature at the age of twenty-eight. Two years later he was elected mayor of Mt. Pleasant. The most significant part of the book for historians begins with the Great Depression and Hinckley's move to the nation's capital to do his part in the relief effort of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "New Deal." Hinckley became Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Air in 1940, playing an important role in the building of Washington's National Airport. His efforts also helped give thousands of young men rudimentary flight training anticipating the mobilization of the country's aviation resources prior to World War II. Other significant government and private sector service in the early 1940s prepared him for his part with Ed Noble in the early 50s, in the creation of the ABC television network. His interest in the political arena spurred him to establish the nonpartisan Hinckley Institute of Politics at the University of Utah in 1966. In fact, the scope and diversity of Robert Hinckley's undertakings make it impossible to do him justice in a brief recapitulation. But saying that Hinckley is a remarkable man is not quite the same as saying this is a remarkable book. To the contrary, this seventh number in the Charles Redd Monographs in Western History has several shortcomings that demand comment. The prose style is uneven and awkward in places; the tone often resembles a kind of rambling oral history memoir rather than the polished writing we might expect of a man of distinction. It is a little difficult to determine to what audience the book was directed. While scholars will find unnecessary the accounts of historical events about which Hinckley possessed little special knowledge (e.g., the choice of the Democratic Party's vice- presidential candidate in 1960), the general reader will probably learn more than he really wants to know about relief measures in the 1930s or contract settlement at the end of World War II. For the most part, it is evident that the editors did their homework and put Mr. Hinckley's papers to good use in reconstructing his story, but a few factual errors remain: The Texas Congressman who first brought Lyndon Johnson to Washington was named Kleberg, not Klebert; Johnson was majority leader in the 1950s, not Democratic whip of the Senate; and at one point (page 83) the implication seems to be that the Second World War began in Europe in the spring of 1939 rather than on September 1. There are a few typographical errors but not so many as to be distracting. We suspect that the author occasionally indulged in namedropping, but hearing first-hand about his dealings with Fiorello LaGuardia, Lucius Clay, Jimmy Doolittle, James Forrestal, Jesse Jones, Elmer Davis, and a score of other important historical personages is half the fun. Hinckley is not reluctant to tell you where he stood concerning the events he witnessed and that may constitute the most valuable part of this work. He was a Democrat all his life "because Democrats were for people," while "Republicans were in favor of things - things like high tariffs to protect business." Some readers may take issue with his assertion on two separate occasions that "Roosevelt and Hopkins together are the reason America didn't go communistic." "During the Hoover Administration, the American populace was ready to go communistic." But few will quarrel with his conclusion that "political wallflowers don't make our democracy work" and that the best way to improve the system is, in Harry Truman's words, "to improve the breed" of politicians. That much Robert Hinckley seems to have tried very hard to do, and if this book inspires more people, young or old, to emulate his example of public service it will have been well worth the effort. Reviewer: DR. F. ALLAN COOMBS is on the faculty of the University of Utah. He has also been a visiting professor of history at the University of Hawaii. Biography.

Hinckley, Rose Afton

Hinckley, Rose Afton
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Afton and Franklin Badger

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1920. Afton Hinckley. She received an AB Degree in Domestic Science in 1920. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 167. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Rose Afton Hinckley Badger was born on May 28, 1896 at Hinckley, Millard County, Utah. She died on February 2, 1990 (aged 93) in Sandy, Salt Lake County, Utah. Interment, Holden Cemetery, Holden, Millard County, Utah. Our sweet mother, grandmother, sister, teacher and friend, Rose Afton Hinckley Badger, died quietly in the home of her son, Franklin in Sandy, Utah on Friday, February 2, 1990 of causes incident to old age. Afton was born on May 28, 1896 in Hinckley, Utah to Apostle Arza Alonzo Hinckley and Rose May Robinson Hinckley. She graduated from BYU in 1920 and taught English and Home Economics at Snow College before marrying Franklin Badger, farmer and rancher of Holden, Millard County, Utah in the Salt Lake LDS Temple on June 26, 1929. They were active members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints where Afton served in many positions, along with her involvement in the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers. They moved to Salt Lake in 1961 to be close to family and do temple work. Afton became a widow in 1964 and devoted her time to genealogical research, family and friends. Her faith in God and the goodness of life were positive influences. She was considered by all who knew her as a loving, supportive, comforting and inspirational friend. She is survived by her children, George H. Badger of Salt Lake City, Utah; Rosemary Badger Goodwin of Grand Rapids, Michigan; Franklin A. Badger of Sandy, Utah; and Jessie Badger Marker of Salt Lake City, Utah. She has 23 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren. Funeral Services were held on Tuesday, February 6, 1990 at 10 am in the Larkin Mortuary Chapel, 260 East South Temple Street, Salt Lake City, Utah. There was a brief viewing at the Holden LDS Chapel prior to interment at the Holden Cemetery. [Deseret News, February 4, 1990] Source.
Family Members:
Parents: Alonzo Arza Hinckley, 18701936; and Rose May Robison Hinckley, 18711949.
Spouse: Franklin Badger, 18841964 (m. 1929).
Siblings: Lois Edna Hinckley, 18931895; Harold Alonzo Hinckley, 18941991; Rulon Tennyson Hinckley, 18971994; Mabel Lynn Hinckley Burgoyne, 19011977; Leah Susannah Hinckley Palmer, 19022000; Angeline Hinckley Solomon, 19042002; Ethel Hinckley Irvine, 19062001; Benjamin Ira Hinckley, 19071907; Mary Hinckley Craven, 19081982, Arza Athaniel Hinckley, 19101992; Nellie R Hinckley, 19122008; Beulah Hinckley Rose, 19142008; Zina Hinckley Ashton, 19162006.
Children: Rulon Tennyson Badger, 18971994; Rosemary Badger Goodwin, 19312010.

Hindley, Edith [Hindlay,]

Hindley, Edith [Hindlay,]
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Edith Taylor

Brigham Young High School, Class of 1909. Edith Hindlay [actually Hindley] received a Music Diploma. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B.Y. Academy, Book 2, Page 181. ~ ~ ~ ~ Edith Hindley was born on November 1, 1887 in American Fork, Utah. She married ______ Taylor. Edith Hindley Taylor died on November 18, 1961 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery, Utah.

Hindley, Liza

Hindley, Liza
Of American Fork, Utah US

Liza Hindley

Class of 1912. Liza Hindley, of American Fork, Utah. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1912. Source 1: 1912 BYU Mizpah, BYH section, photos and names on pp. 1 - 105. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1912. Liza Hindley. She received a BYH Normal Diploma in 1912. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 7, page 99.

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