Alphabetical Alumni

Clark, Betty
152 North 1350 East
Springville, Utah 84663-1747 US

Betty and Sam Francis
  • Work: (801) 489-5225

Class of 1955. Betty Clark. Chorus Accompanist, Pep Club, Notre Maison Vice President, Thespians, Debate, Short Plays, Childrens Theater, Senior Hop Committee, Sweetheart Queen, Honor Roll. BYU BS Elementary Instruction 1959. Married Sam Francis. They have two sons: Michael and Gary. Betty has had some health problems, related to diabetes. They own Classroom Classics business, producing with their sons, a new patriotic program each year that is used by schools throughout the U.S. They have also produced music for the Boy Scouts of America and have a Church CD entitled "Called to Serve." Each year, 5,000 school children sing their songs at the Marriott Center at the Hope of America Student Showcase. For their efforts to promote patriotism, Sam and Gary received the Champion of Liberty Award from the Freedom Festival. They have written songs for the Freedom Festival Patriotic Program and for the Stadium of Fire program. Sam and Gary wrote the new State song, "Utah . . . This is the Place" and it was sung by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. This song was the theme of the Statehood Centennial program which they produced in 1996 for the children of Utah. Their songs have been performed for the two Bush presidents, the National PTA Convention, for TV after-school specials, and for the United Nations Youth Ecology Convention. Son Mike works for Altiris. See website for Betty's article, "Sentimental Journey" about BYH.

Clark, Bradley Drexel

Clark, Bradley Drexel
Sugar City, Idaho

Drexel and Janette Clark

Class of 1968. Drexel Clark. OBITUARY: Dr. Bradley Drexel Clark, 54, prominent and beloved teacher at Brigham Young University-Idaho, died suddenly and unexpectedly of natural causes at his home in Sugar City, Saturday, Nov. 20, 2004. Bradley Drexel Clark was born April 6, 1950, in Salt Lake City, to Bruce B. and Ouida Raphiel Clark. After graduating from Brigham Young High School in Provo, Utah, he served a mission for the LDS Church in the Argentina North Mission from 1969-1971. In 1974, he received a bachelor's degree in Spanish from Brigham Young University, graduating as college valedictorian. He then attended law school at BYU for three semesters before deciding to pursue advanced degrees in Spanish. In 1979, Bradley served as a teaching assistant in the BYU study abroad program in Spain. There he met Janette Robinson, daughter of Donald W. and Helen Sorensen Robinson, who was a student in the program. Brad and Janette fell in love, recognized they wanted to be together forever and were married in the Provo LDS Temple in Provo, Utah, Aug, 23, 1979. They have been constantly together for more than 25 years, through Bradley's graduate studies at Brigham Young University and the University of Texas, his teaching career in Utah, Texas and Idaho, and the birth and education of their five children. Dr. Clark completed his master's degree in Spanish literature in August 1981 and his doctorate in Spanish language, literature, and culture at the University of Texas (Austin) in August 1988. He has taught part-time at BYU and the University of Texas in Austin and full time at Texas A&M University in College Station (1986-87), Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas (1988-1994), where he was head of the Spanish and Foreign Language program, and since 1997 at BYU-I, as a professor of Spanish Language and Literature, where he was head of the Spanish section. He was a superb teacher. In every teaching position he has ever held, both in college and in multiple church assignments, he has been recognized as a popular and excellent teacher, with a quick wit and mastery of language. Bradley has been a faithful member of the LDS Church all of his life. As a boy he was an Eagle Scout, then served a mission in Argentina, and since then has filled many callings: Scoutmaster, stake clerk, on the stake high council, as a counselor in a bishopric, ward mission leader, he has had extensive teaching assignments, was a member of the high priest quorum, a home teacher and various other positions. Bradley's interests and activities throughout his life have been widespread: entomology (he has collected insects all of his life), genealogy, fishing, physical fitness with daily exercising and jogging, travel (United States, Europe, and South America), Hispanic culture and food, camping, hiking, gardening, and archaeology (especially Book of Mormon archaeology). Above all, his interest and concern have always been his family. Bradley is survived by his wife, Janette; children, Daniel, Richard, Rebecca, Steven and Deborah; parents, Bruce and Ouida Clark of Orem, Utah; brothers, Robert Clark [BYH Class of 1970]of Orem, Utah, Jeffrey (Anne) Clark [BYH Class of 1971] of Washington, D.C., and Shawn (Barbara) Clark of Spanish Fork, Utah; sisters, Lorraine (Vencil) Clark [BYH Class of 1965] Skarda of Provo, Utah and Sandra Clark of Orem, Utah; father-in-law, Donald Robinson of Provo; and many nephews and nieces. Funeral services were held Wednesday November 24, 2004 in Sugar City, Idaho. Interment, Orem City Cemetery in Orem, Utah. [Rexburg Standard Journal, Tuesday, November 23, 2004.]

Clark, Bryant Randall

Clark, Bryant Randall
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Bryant and Reta Clark

Class of 1921. Bryant Clark. Source 1: Photograph of the BYH Graduating Class of 1921. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1921. Bryant Clark. Source 2: 1921 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1921. Bryant R. Clark. He received a High School Diploma in 1921. Source 3: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 402. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1925. Bryant R. Clark. He received a BS Degree in Mathematics in 1925. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 402. Bryant Randall Clark was born on January 30, 1902 in Georgetown, Idaho. His parents were Edward Barrett Clark and Alice Randall Clark. Bryant married Reta Jane Brown on August 25, 1926 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Bryant R. Clark died on November 13, 1981 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His interment, Charleston, Utah.

Clark, Carol Ann
1363 South 1900 East
Salt Lake City, Utah 84108 US

Carol Ann and John Hayes
  • Work: (801) 583-5150

Class of 1970. Carol Ann Clark. BYU BA Fine Arts and Communication 1975. Married John K. Hayes, Jr. Her parents: J. Kyle Clark, Sr., M.D. [BY High Class of 1930 & Student Body President] and Lois Kathryn Anderson, married 1942. Their children: James Kyle, Jr. [BYH Class of 1962] and wife, Melissa; Kathryn C. Spencer [BYH Class of 1964] and husband, Darrell; John A. Clark and Renee Williams; Brent A. Clark, Carol Ann C. Hayes [BYH Class of 1970] and husband, John K. Jr.; and Kristine C. Chapman and husband, Bradley.

Clark, Cecil [D. Cecil] (1954)
768 East 2680 North
Provo, Utah 84604-4053 US

Cecil and Gaile Clark
  • Home: 801-375-0460

Class of 1954. Cecil Clark [D. Cecil Clark]. Football, Baseball, Tennis, Lettermen, Band, French Club President, Senate. ~ ~ ~ ~ His parents: Dr. DaCosta Clark, and Hazel Jean Cook Clark [BYU Laboratory Elementary Faculty]. Their children: Laura Clark (Lynn) Stewart of Logan, Utah; D. Cecil [BYH Class of 1954] and Gaile Clark of Provo, Utah; Mary Clark [BYH Class of 1958~H] (Larry) Gill; and David G. [BYH Class of 1963] and Lisa Clark of Denver, Colorado. ~ ~ ~ ~ Books Written By D. Cecil Clark: 1. Teaching: An Introduction, January, 1990. 2. Teaching like the Master: Getting beyond techniques, 1994. 3. Using Instructional Objectives in Teaching, December, 1972. 4. The Teacher Within: A Voyage of Discovery, 2000. 5. Trail Dust "Latigo Joe" by Cecil G. Clark & D. Taulbee, 1959. 5. Paradise Unrealized: Teacher Educators and the Costs and Benefits of School/University Partnerships.: An article from: Journal of Teacher Education, D. Cecil Clark, et. al., July 28, 2005. 6. Rethinking field experience: partnership teaching versus single-placement teaching.: An article from: Journal of Teacher Education, D. Cecil Clark, et. al., July 29, 2005. 7. Superphosphate: Its History, Chemistry, and Manufacture, D. Cecil Clark, et. al., 1964 8. Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. Research, evaluation and development paper series, by D. Cecil Clark, 1975. ~ ~ ~ ~ Dr. D. Cecil Clark. @2010

Clark, Cecile (1931)

Cecile Clark

Class of 1931. Cecile Clark. She, along with classmate Lyman Partridge, delivered the class prognostication during the graduation exercises of Brigham Young High School on Thursday, May 28, 1931. Source: The Evening Herald, Provo, Utah, Tuesday, May 26, 1931. ~ ~ ~ ~ Cecile Clark (female)(spelled Ceicle on cast list), served as the 1930-1931 BYH Student Body Secretary. She played a part in the annual BYH play, "The Youngest", presented in College Hall on December 12, 1930. Source: BYU Banyan 1931.

Clark, Christopher

Christopher Clark

Class of 1975. Christopher Clark [Clarke?] [Need more information.] [TM]

Clark, Corbin
9690 South 1300 East
Sandy, Utah 84093-6950

Corbin and Radana Clark
  • Work: (801) 571-5121

Class of 1964. Married Radana.

Clark, Cynthia J.
968 Fir Ave
Provo, Utah 84604

Cynthia and Stephen Clark
  • Home: 801-361-3695

Brigham Young Academy Foundation Member. Cynthia J. Clark, served as a city councilwoman in Provo. She married Stephen D. Clark, a state legislator in Utah. Together they have nine children.

Clark, DaCosta

Clark, DaCosta
Provo, Utah US

DaCosta Clark

BYH Class of 1925. DaCosta Clark, of Provo, Utah. He was a 3rd Year (junior) in 1924, and a 4th Year (senior) graduate in the BYH Class of 1925. Background sources: BYU/BYH Annual Catalogues for the School Years 1923-24, 1924-25, and 1925-26.

Clark, Dan L.

Clark, Dan L.

Provo, Utah 84604-5130 US

Dan and Julie Clark
  • Cell:
  • Home:

Class of 1967. Dan Clark. Letterman, Band, Football, Basketball, Class Social Chair, Seminary Graduate. BYU BS Justice Administration 1975. BYU MA Communications 1975. Wife, Julie Anderson, BYH Class of 1968. BYU MPA Executive MPA Program 1989. @2011

Clark, David Crawford (1968)

Clark, David Crawford (1968)
Provo, Utah US

Dave Clark

Class of 1968. Dave Clark. Photographer & Business Manager of Brigadier Newspaper in 1967-68. ~ ~ ~ ~ David Crawford Clark was born on June 13, 1950 in Provo, Utah. His parents were Dr. Stanley Newell Clark and Dorothy Corbin Clark. David married but was divorced. He was a military veteran. David C. Clark died on August 5, 1978 in Provo, Utah. His interment, Provo City Cemetery, Utah.

Clark, David Garn (1963)

Clark, David Garn (1963)
Highlands Ranch, Colorado US

David and Lisa Clark

Class of 1963. David G. Clark. 1963 BYH Senior Class President. Football, Wrestling, Y Club, Debate, Band, Junior Class President, Honor Society, Safety Council, Model U.N., Wildcat Yearbook Features Editor, Seminary Graduate, Chorus, Interpretive, Science Fair. His parents: Dr. DaCosta Clark and Hazel Jean Cook Clark [BYU Laboratory Elementary Faculty]. Their children: Laura Clark (Lynn) Stewart of Logan, Utah; D. Cecil [BYH Class of 1954] and Gaile Clark of Provo, Utah; Mary Clark [BYH Class of 1958~H] (Larry) Gill; and David G. [BYH Class of 1963] and Lisa Clark of Denver, Colorado. David: BYU BS Chemistry 1969. Jefferson Medical College - Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, MD 1974. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: David Garn Clark, M.D., husband, father and surgeon, passed away peacefully at his home on Saturday, February 10, 2007. Dr. Clark had practiced surgery in the South Denver Area for twenty-six years. A memorial service was held on Thursday, February 15, 2007 at the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 9800 Foothills Canyon Boulevard, Highlands Ranch, Colorado. The family suggested donations be made to Humanitarian Services at www.ldsfoundation.org [Denver Newspaper Agency, February 14 and 15, 2007.]

Clark, Dean

Clark, Dean
Of Provo, Utah US

Dean Clark

Class of 1912. Dean Clark, of Provo, Utah. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1912. Source: 1912 BYU Mizpah, BYH section, photos and names on pp. 1 - 105.

Clark, Don E.

Clark, Don E.

Don Clark

Class of 1915. Don E. Clark graduated from BYH in College Hall on Thursday, June 3, 1915, the only graduate in the Agricultural Department this year. Source: Program, 1915 High School Class, Thursday, June 3, 1915, College Hall. Class Colors: Red & Blue. Class Motto: "Duty is the Keynote of Success". ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1915. Don E. Clark. He received a BYH Agriculture Diploma in 1915. Source 2: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 7, page 36.

Clark, Elden (1917)

Clark, Elden (1917)

Elden Clark

Class of 1917. Elden Clark. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1917. Source 1: 1917 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, pages 82-88. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1917. Elden Clark. He received a High School Diploma in 1917. Source 2: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 297.

Clark, Elden (1939)

Elden Clark

Class of 1939. Elden Clark. Vice President of his Junior Class in 1937-1938. Boys' Organization. Boys' Trio. Orpheus Club.

Clark, Evelyn Claire

Evelyn Clark

Class of 1945. Evelyn Claire Clark.

Clark, G. Rulon

Clark, G. Rulon

Rulon Clark

Class of 1914. G. Rulon Clark. He received a BYH Agriculture Diploma in 1914. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 6, page 183. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1919. G. Rulon Clark. He received an AB Degree in 1919. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 6, page 183.

Clark, Garn

Clark, Garn

Garn Clark

B. Y. Academy Collegiate Class of 1897. Garn Clark. Normal Diploma, no degree mentioned, but he is listed with B. Pd. graduates. Source 1: Name contained in an informal "Cast of Characters" graduation / advertising program of 1897.] ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 2: Program, BYA Exercises, Class of '97, Normal Department, BYU Special Collections, UA 1008, Box 1, Folder 1.

Clark, Grant (1918)

Clark, Grant (1918)

Grant Clark

Class of 1918. Grant Clark. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1918. Source: 1918 BYU Banyan, High School section, pages 60-79. (see Grant Clark, Class of 1912)

Clark, Grant Steed (1912)

Clark, Grant Steed (1912)
Of Farmington, Utah US

Grant Clark

Class of 1912. Grant Clark, of Farmington, Utah. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1912. Source 1: 1912 BYU Mizpah, BYH section, photos and names on pp. 1 - 62, 105. (See Grant Clark, Class of 1918) ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1912. Grant Steed Clark. He received a High School Diploma in 1912. Source 2: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 4, page 430.

Clark, Gregory Dallan
1841 N. Oakridge Lane
Provo, Utah 84604 US

Greg and Linda Clark
  • Work: 801-377-6449

Class of 1968. Gregory D. Clark. BYU MA English 1972. Rensselaer Poly-Tech Institute PhD 1985. Greg Clark lives in Provo and teaches in the English Department at BYU. He and Linda (Nelson) were married in 1972 and have three daughters. Alternate address: Brigham Young University, 4002 JFSB, Provo, Utah 84602 - (801) 422-3581 News: Prof. Greg Clark Named Executive Director of the Rhetoric Society of America, beginning July 1. He has served as editor of RSQ. Dr. Clark succeeds David Henry, the first RSA executive director. ~ ~ ~ ~ Greg Clark has taught at BYU since 1985. During that time he has taught courses in American literature, writing, and rhetoric. He has directed the English Composition and American Studies programs, has chaired the English Department, and now serves as an Associate Dean of the College of Humanities.Professor Clark has published a number of books and shorter pieces on rhetoric and rhetorical studies of American culture, and has served as editor of the journal Rhetoric Society Quarterly. He now serves as executive director of the RSA. @Dec 2008 ~ ~ ~ ~ Alternate version of street address: 1841 North 1400 East, Provo, Utah @2010

Clark, Hannah T.

Clark, Hannah T.
St. George, Utah US

Hannah and Walter Pike

BY Academy High School Class of 1891? Hannah Clark. Although she is not listed with the graduates of the Class of 1891, she is listed as a member of the Graduation Committee in the 1891 BYA graduation program, and she was not listed with the Juniors. It is likely she was a high school music graduate in 1891 -- need more research. ~ ~ ~ ~ Hannah T. Clark was born on October 19, 1873 in Provo, Utah. Her parents were Joseph Clark and Frances Carter Clark. Hannah married Dr. Walter Randal [or Randall] Pike, after Dr. Pike's first wife died. Hannah C. Pike died on April 2, 1947 in Los Angeles, California. Her interment, Provo City Cemetery, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ In 1878 when Provo's population hovered near 3,000, the city provided a living for nine doctors. At least one of those doctors, Walter Randal Pike, had traveled the world and led a fascinating life. Pike, born in 1848, emigrated to America from England. As a very young man he spent some time at sea, then came to the United States at age 16. After traveling the American West for three years, young Walter settled in Salt Lake City, where he began the study of medicine at 19. He finished his course of study in two years and entered the drug store business, working for the ZCMI pharmacy. During his five years as a druggist, Pike gained a thorough knowledge of drugs and medicine. The young druggist traveled east in 1876 and attended Burlington Medical School in Vermont. He graduated from a one-year course and moved to New York City where he received another medical degree in 1878. Pike returned to the West and partnered with Dr. Joseph Benedict in Salt Lake City. Pike then moved to Provo where he began his own practice. While living in the latter city, he became a U.S. citizen in 1881. Provo hired Pike as the city's quarantine physician in 1878. He held that job until 1885, even though he moved back to Salt Lake City briefly and practiced medicine there during part of 1884 and 1885. According to the Deseret News, when Pike moved back to Utah's capital city for a brief time, the people welcomed the "more than ordinarily successful" doctor. He had, by this early time, earned a very good reputation in his career. The paper called him "one of the ablest and most popular physicians in Utah." In May 1884, Dr. Pike (who was by this time married) decided to move back to Provo. But Mrs. Pike was suffering from nervous prostration, and this delayed the move several weeks. In the early 1880s, Utah's Legislature voted to establish a territorial insane asylum and chose Provo as the site for the institution. The hospital's board of directors selected Dr. Pike as the asylum's first medical superintendent in 1884. The doctor resigned as Provo's quarantine physician and accepted the new job, which came with an annual salary of $1,500. Pike and Judge Warren Dusenberry left Provo in early January 1885 on a tour of several asylums in the East. They hoped to return with useful ideas on how to run Utah's new mental hospital. The asylum opened later in 1885. After accepting the prestigious position of medical superintendent of the territorial asylum, Pike began construction of a large two-story home befitting his lofty position. The house was built on the west side of Academy (University) Avenue on 400 South. In addition to his job as director of the asylum, Pike kept up his private practice. In the spring of 1886, he entered into a partnership with Dr. Hardy. The two had their office above Smoot Drugstore on west Center Street near Academy Ave. Tragedy struck the doctor's household in October 1892 when Mrs. Pike died. She had made a large circle of friends in Provo despite her chronic ill health, and her funeral at the Provo Tabernacle was well attended. Dr. Pike immersed himself in his occupation and delved into new activities. He campaigned for a seat in the territorial Legislature in 1892 and won. While serving in the Legislature, he introduced several bills regulating the medical and pharmacological professions. Because of his work in this area, he became known as Utah's father of medicine and pharmacy. After about a year spent in mourning, Dr. Pike developed a new love interest, Miss Hannah Clark, a native of Provo who was 23 years his junior. Hannah had graduated from Brigham Young Academy and was busy teaching music and drama. The two hoped to carry on a quiet courtship, and they succeeded until the evening of Dec. 13, 1893. On that date, Dr. Pike drove his buggy to Miss Clark's west-side home and picked her up. The two then drove to John Lewis's livery stable on the west side of 100 West between Center Street and 100 North. They left the vehicle and the horse in the care of Mr. Lewis and walked to the 4th Ward church, then located on the north side of 200 North between Academy Avenue and 100 East. Once inside, the couple joined a surprise party for Professor Giles, an instructor at Brigham Young Academy. They left the hall about midnight. Unfortunately, that was the hour when Provo's streetlights were turned off. The absence of artificial lights combined with low-lying clouds made the night as dark as "a stack of black cats," according to the Deseret News. The darkness was so intense that the two pedestrians found it difficult to locate the livery stable, a mere two blocks away. It might have been romantic if a furious gale had not been blowing. Dr. Pike and Miss Clark arrived at the livery stable and climbed into the waiting buggy. Since Center Street was so badly rutted at that time of the year, and since Hannah lived four blocks west on 100 North, Pike choose 100 North as the route to Hannah's home. The street lights had been turned off for the night, so the traveled portion of the road was almost impossible to see. Dr. Pike drove slowly, holding a line in each hand. Miss Clark held firmly to his right arm as he leaned forward, intently trying to discern any sign of wagon tracks. Unbeknownst to poor Pike and his feminine companion, the buggy traveled a somewhat serpentine course and left the road, gradually veering a few feet northward. The doctor trusted his horse to find the narrow bridge across the millrace on 200 West. Unfortunately, the horse's sight proved to be no better than its driver's. By the time the buggy reached the stream, the vehicle was six feet north of the bridge. The horse stepped off a five-foot, stone embankment, plunging the buggy and its occupants into Provo's millrace, filled with three-and-a-half feet of fast-moving chilly water. Luckily, both passengers fell mostly free of the buggy. After extricating himself, Pike began a frenzied search for Miss Clark, who was submerged in the darkness. The doctor felt her coat collar, grasped it tightly, and pulled her head above water. Hannah was known as a songstress with a powerful voice. Her robust voice attracted the attention of sleepers blocks away, as well as the night watchman patrolling Center Street. A crowd assembled near the bridge in minutes. Neighbors helped Hannah to a nearby house. Although she had suffered a severe nervous shock, Dr. Pike, who was most solicitous of his companion's health, found her physically uninjured. Rescuers conveyed Miss Clark, suffering from shock and a few bruises, to her home three blocks away. They took the shaken Dr. Pike, who received a scratch on his hand and bruises on his side, to the asylum, where he soon came down with a severe cold. It appears Pike's involuntary baptism neither cooled his ardor for Miss Clark nor gave him cold feet. Three weeks after the couple scampered from Provo's frigid millrace, they calmly walked together into the placid waters of matrimony. On Jan. 2, 1894, Mayor Dusenberry performed the ceremony at the Clark residence. The bride wore a cream satin dress decorated with white roses. According to the Salt Lake Herald, a "dainty supper was served" at 6 o'clock. The paper also observed: "The event was something of a surprise to many of Dr. Pike's friends, but they are all pleased." After the accident, Pike did not spend many more years in Provo. In 1896, the asylum board offered to renew his contract for $2,000 per year. Pike demanded $2,500, and the board balked. The doctor tendered his resignation, effective in six months. Pike moved his private practice to his home, but he did not work full time. In 1898, Pike toured large hospitals in the East and in Europe. He called on relatives in New York and visited his old home in England. After returning from Europe, Pike took a three-month, post-graduate course in New York City. Rheumatism and asthma forced Pike to leave Provo in 1900, and his stately home became the Crane Maternity Hospital. The doctor and his wife moved to St. George, where he gradually retired from medicine because of declining health. The couple built the St. George Drug Company and managed it until the doctor's death June 10, 1921. Pike's funeral was held in the Provo Tabernacle and he was buried in the Provo City Cemetery. The Washington County News described Pike as "a courtly gentleman, kindly in his disposition and ever willing to serve. His activities were limited owing to his physical condition, but he could always be depended upon to do his part in all public improvements." [Thanks to D. Robert Carter - Provo Daily Herald, Sunday, July 08, 2007.] ~ ~ ~ ~ Walter R. Pike was born on June 8, 1948, in Norwich, Norfolk, England. His parents were Peter Newman Pike and Mary Hendrie Randal [or Randall] Pike. He became a medical doctor, and was a veteran of the Utah Black Hawk War. Dr. Pike died on June 10, 1921 in St. George, Utah. His interment, Provo City Cemetery, Utah.

Clark, Hazel Jean Cook

Clark, Hazel Jean Cook
Provo, Utah US

Hazel and DaCosta Clark

Faculty and Staff. BYU Laboratory School & BYU College of Education, total 23 years. BYU Elementary 4th Grade Teacher 1959-1960. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Hazel Jean Cook Clark, former Provo resident and wife of the late Dr. DaCosta Clark, died June 20, 2000, at the home of her daughter in Denver, Colorado. Hazel was the only daughter of David W. Cook and Jean Cook. She had six brothers who predeceased her: William, Cecil, Dewey, Loyal, Grant and Blaine. Hazel was born November 14, 1907, in Fountain Green, Utah. In 1918, the family moved to Logan, Utah, where she attended elementary school, high school, and the Brigham Young College of Logan. She earned a B.S. from the University of Utah; attended Teachers College, Columbia University; and completed an M.S. at Brigham Young University. Hazel was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served in many callings at the ward and stake level. She was an accomplished pianist, organist, and chorister who loved music; she began playing the organ for the Logan 11th Ward when she was twelve years old. Music and the gospel were always integral parts of her life. Hazel loved, appreciated and enjoyed children. During her professional career in early childhood education, Hazel taught in the Jordan School District, in Boston, Massachusetts; and for six years at the Edith Bowen School in Logan, Utah. For twenty-three years Hazel taught at Brigham Young University, first at the Laboratory School on Lower Campus and then in the College of Education teacher preparation program. Hazel has always been an inspiration and influence for good to all who knew her. Hazel is survived by her children and their spouses: Laura Clark (Lynn) Stewart of Logan, Utah; Cecil [BYH Class of 1954] and Gaile Clark of Provo, Utah; Mary Clark [BYH Class of 1958~H] (Larry) Gill, and David [BYH Class of 1963] and Lisa Clark of Denver, Colorado; 21 grandchildren and 41 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Monday, June 26, 2000, at the Oak Hills 9th Ward LDS Chapel, 1960 North 1500 East, Provo. Interment, Provo City Cemetery. [Deseret News, Friday, June 23, 2000.]

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