Alphabetical Alumni

Brimhall, Stephen
25 Montana Lane
Menlo Park, California 94025

Steve and Mary Jo Brimhall

Class of 1958 - Honorary. [Students who attended BYH or BYJrH but for one reason or another graduated from other schools.] His parents: Wells Smoot (Smoot) Brimhall [BYH Class of 1932] and Viva Maurine (Maurine) Jones Brimhall [BYA Foundation member], married in Salt Lake City in 1935. Their children: Janelle Brimhall [BYH Class of 1955] (Peter) Lysenko, Provo, Utah; Stephen (Mary Jo) Brimhall [BYH Class of 1958 ~ Honorary], Menlo Park, California; George (Brenda) Brimhall, Paradise Valley, Arizona; Bonnie Brimhall (Dick) Kofford, Orem, Utah; Wells L. (Susan) Brimhall (deceased), Phoenix, Arizona. @2001.

Brimhall, Tirzah

Brimhall, Tirzah

Tirzah Brimhall

Class of 1921 ~ Honorary. Tirzah Brimhall. Member of the Class of 1921 as a freshman in 1918.

Brimhall, Tryphina

Brimhall, Tryphina
Provo, Utah US

Tryphina Brimhall

Faculty & Staff. Tryphina Brimhall, Training School, 1893-1894.

Brimhall, Viva Maurine [Jones]

Brimhall, Viva Maurine [Jones]
Orem, Utah US

Maurine and Smoot Brimhall

Brigham Young Academy Foundation Member. See VIVA MAURINE JONES.

Brimhall, Wells Lorin (1970)

Brimhall, Wells Lorin (1970)

Wells and Susan Brimhall

Class of 1970. Wells Lorin Brimhall. OBITUARY: Wells L. Brimhall was born May 15, 1952 in Provo, Utah. He married Susan, and they lived in Phoenix, Arizona. He died December 3, 1989. His parents: Wells Smoot (Smoot) Brimhall [BYH Class of 1932] and Viva Maurine (Maurine) Jones Brimhall [BYA Foundation member], married in Salt Lake City in 1935. Their children: Janelle Brimhall [BYH Class of 1955] (Peter) Lysenko, Provo, Utah; Stephen (Mary Jo) Brimhall [BYH Class of 1958 ~ Honorary], Menlo Park, California; George (Brenda) Brimhall [BYH Class of 1959 ~ Honorary], Paradise Valley, Arizona; Bonnie Brimhall (Dick) Kofford, Orem, Utah; Wells L. (Susan) Brimhall [BYH Class of 1970] (deceased), Phoenix, Arizona.

Brimhall, Wells Smoot (1932)

Brimhall, Wells Smoot (1932)
Orem, Utah US

Smoot-Maurien-Helena Brimhall

Class of 1932. W. Smoot Brimhall. Graduated from Brigham Young High School on Thursday, June 2, 1932. He delivered the address of welcome during the ceremonies. Source: The Evening Herald, Provo, Utah, Wednesday, June 1, 1932. ~ ~ ~ ~ Smoot Brimhall was a member of the BYH Debate Team during the 1930-1931 school year, according to the 1931 BYU Banyan. ~ ~ ~ ~ Wells Smoot Brimhall is a Brigham Young Academy Foundation Member. ~ ~ ~ ~ DEATH NOTICE: W. Smoot Brimhall, age 96, of Provo, passed away March 10, 2011. Funeral arrangements are pending and will be announced by Berg Mortuary of Provo, 185 East Center Street. 801-373-1841 [Provo Herald, March 11, 2011] ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Wells Smoot Brimhall passed away on March 10, 2011 at his home in Provo, Utah. He was born in Provo on July 19, 1914. His parents were Wells Lovett Brimhall & Fern Smoot Brimhall. He attended the BYU Training School, graduating from Brigham Young High School in the Class of 1932, and then he graduated from Brigham Young University in 1935. He spent two years studying at Columbia University in New York City and two years of graduate work at Stanford University, where he received the MBA degree. He married Viva Maurine Jones, from Las Vegas, New Mexico in 1935. They were married in the LDS Temple in Salt Lake City. During their married years they lived in Utah, California, New York and Illinois. They had 5 children. Smoot served two years in the military service during World War II. Then he and his family settled in Provo where Smoot was active in business and civic affairs. Smoot joined with Phil Knight to open and operate Knights Men's Shop on University Ave for 20 years. He served terms on the Provo City Commission, Provo City Council, and was a Director of State Bank of Provo, becoming President of the Bank before it merged with the Springville Banking Company and the name changed to Central Bank & Trust Company. He was a member of the High Council of the first LDS Stake on the BYU Campus. He was appointed to the office of Utah State Bank Commissioner (the name of the office later changed to Commissioner of Financial Institutions) by Governor Calvin L. Rampton. He served in that office for 13 years before retiring in 1988, after which he spent several years with Tracy Collins Bank & Trust Company in Salt Lake, serving as Consultant to the Chairman. Smoot was an Eagle Scout and supported the Boy Scout program throughout his life. He was an active member of the Kiwanis Club in Provo and also in Salt Lake City. He and Maurine were both active in support of their son George, and his associates, in the building of family recreation parks and other business activities in California and Arizona. He and Maurine moved back to Utah Valley in 1988 and lived there during the summers and in Phoenix, Arizona, during the winters. Maurine passed away in 2001. Smoot married Helena Call Jacobsen on August 8, 2002, in Jackson Wyoming. They have traveled together, supported each other's children and enjoyed a very special relationship together for the past 8 years. He was pre-deceased by his wife Maurine, his sister, Sina Brimhall Stevenson [BYH Classes of 1927 & 1928] and his son, Wells Lorin Brimhall. He is survived by his wife, Helena, brother Victor O. Brimhall, daughters Janelle Brimhall (Peter) Lysenko and Bonnie Brimhall (Dick) Kofford, his daughter-in-law Sue (Wells, deceased) Brimhall, and sons Stephen (Mary Jo) Brimhall and George (Brenda) Brimhall; Helena's daughters Jeri (John) Snow, Betty Lynne (Ernie) Middleton, and Barbara (Kevin, deceased) Sondrup; 23 grandchildren, 76 great-grandchildren and 3 great-great-grandchildren. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations be sent in his name to Utah National Parks Council, Boy Scouts of America, 748 N 1340 W, Orem, UT 84057. Funeral services were held Wednesday, March 16, 2011 at the Pleasant View 9th Ward Chapel, 2445 N Timpview Dr (650 East), Provo, Utah. Interment, Provo City Cemetery. [Provo Daily Herald, Sunday, March 13, 2011] ~ ~ ~ ~ OBITUARY OF HIS FIRST SPOUSE: Viva Maurine (Maurine) Jones Brimhall, civic and church leader, born February 10, 1915, in Provo, Utah to Ivie H. and Lorin F. Jones, died in her Orem home, Saturday, May 5, 2001. Maurine was the eldest and last surviving of four children: Ray L. Jones, Mae La Vieve Sudweeks, and William Elbert Jones. Her family moved to Las Vegas, New Mexico in 1920, and it is in that environment that she grew up, attending Las Vegas public schools and New Mexico Normal University. To help with college expenses, Maurine designed and made Chimayo Indian Sport Coats for Charles Ilfield Company. To further her education, Maurine attended BYU in 1932, graduating in 1935. She married Wells Smoot Brimhall September 9, 1935 in the LDS Temple in Salt Lake City, Utah and moved to New York City where her husband attended Columbia College. She worked at Teachers College, a subsidiary of Columbia University. Maurine was active in civic affairs with the PTA, The Lady Kiwanians and the 4-H Clubs (she started the first 4-H club in Provo, and at a younger age, won trips to Chicago and Washington, D. C.). She developed a city-wide bicycle safety program for Provo school children and won 2nd place in the nation, receiving the award at a National Safety Conference in Chicago. She represented Utah at a National Convention on Children and Youth in Washington D. C. (1960) and at a National Safety Conference in San Francisco. She was appointed by Utah's Governor to serve on a 12-member committee on children and youth. Maurine had a talented gift for music, playing the piano and marimba, and also producing many delightful compositions as a special occasion song writer for family, community and church affairs. During the late 1930's and early 1940's schooling and employment took Maurine and Smoot from Utah to California to New York to Illinois and back again to Provo. There she brought up her family until 1965 when she moved to Salt Lake City, living there for about 20 years before returning to Utah Valley. Some of the highlights of her civic activities in Salt Lake include the Director for ladies lunch programs at the national conventions of The Conference of State Bank Supervisors. She was the founder and director of the Utah Citizens for Decency, working with the national organizations (Morality in Media, C. D. L., The American Family Association and the LDS Church) in her crusade against pornography. Her organization was influential in the passage of strong anti-pornography laws in Utah and other states. Maurine was active in and was a financial supporter of her sons' Family Entertainment Centers and building activities in California, Arizona, and Florida. She moved to Orem in 1988, spending summers there and winters with her children who live in Phoenix, Arizona. She has been an active and life-long member and supporter of the LDS Church and has been prominent among the crusaders for the preservation and restoration of Academy Square in Provo. Maurine is survived by her husband, Wells Smoot Brimhall and by four of her five children: Janelle Brimhall [BYH Class of 1955; BYAF] (Peter) Lysenko, Provo, Utah; Stephen (Mary Jo) Brimhall, Menlo Park, California; George (Brenda) Brimhall, Paradise Valley, Arizona; Bonnie Brimhall (Dick) Kofford, Orem, Utah; Wells L. (Susan) Brimhall (deceased), Phoenix, Arizona. Maurine is also the proud and loving grandmother of 23 grandchildren and 44 great-grandchildren. "Maurine", "Mom", and "Grandma Brimhall" will be missed by all of us. The family would appreciate that in lieu of flowers, please send a contribution to Brigham Young Academy Foundation, P. O. Box 12, Provo, Utah 84603. Funeral services were held Saturday, May 12, 2001 in Orem, Utah. Interment, Provo City Cemetery. [Deseret News, Wednesday, May 9, 2001.] ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS SECOND WIFE: Helena Call Jacobsen Brimhall - 1912 ~ 2014. Our adorable mother, grandmother, sister and friend passed away peacefully in her home on January 9, 2014. She was born July 10, 1912, in Rigby, Idaho to Oel Facer Call and Helena Van Der Well (who died when Helena was born) and Myrtle Stowell, the wonderful mother who raised her. In 1933, in Washington D.C., she married her college sweetheart, S.E. (Tug) Jacobsen. They were later sealed in the Salt Lake Temple. They celebrated over 60 years of marriage before Tug passed away in 1994. Helena loved life and was loved by everyone whose life she touched. As a long time secretary at Wasatch Elementary School she was loved by students and teachers alike. Throughout her life she was actively involved in community, civic and social organizations. As a lifelong member of the LDS church, her favorite calling was that of visiting teacher. Of Helena one can say she truly loved life and lived each day to the fullest. Mother had a fun and unique sense of humor which she delighted in using to joyfully joke and tease her family and friends. She graciously shared her home, talents, delicious home cooked food and hand crafted articles and stitcheries. In 2002, she married Wells Smoot Brimhall. They spent 8 wonderful years together before his passing in 2011. Helena is survived by three daughters: Geraldine (John) Snow of Salt Lake City, Betty Lynne (Ernest) Middleton of Reno, NV and Barbara (Kevin-deceased) Sondrup of Dallas, TX; 11 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren and 3 great-great-grandchildren; brother, Dr. Lloyd Call of Pocatello, ID; sister, Rhoda Vaun Young of Provo; the W. Smoot Brimhall family and many nieces and nephews. The family wishes to express their thanks and gratitude to her nurse Frederika, the student nurses and Alpine Hospice for their professional and loving care these past three years. A funeral service to celebrate her life will be held at 11:00 a.m., Saturday, January 18, 2014 at the Pleasant View 9th Ward Chapel, 2445 North Timpview Drive (650 East), Provo, Utah. Friends may call at the church from 9:30-10:45 a.m. prior to services. Interment will be at the Provo City Cemetery. Condolences may be sent online at www.bergmortuary.com [Provo Daily Herald, January 16, 2014]

Brimhall, Wendell
836 W. 100 S.
Provo, Utah 84601-4002

Wendell and Joyce Brimhall

Class of 1945. Married Joyce Taylor. @2001

Bringhurst, J. Frank

Bringhurst, J. Frank
Springville, Utah US

Frank and Mahala Bringhurst

J. Frank Bringhurst. He is listed on a list of 59 names of the earliest students of Brigham Young Academy, taken from a file in the BYU Archives, made by an unknown contemporary student. ~ ~ ~ ~ John Frank Bringhurst was born on December 13, 1861 in Springville, Utah. His parents: William Bringhurst and Ann Wollerton Dilworth Bringhurst. J. Frank Bringhurst married Mahala Harriet Crandall on October 22, 1885 in Logan, Utah. Frank Bringhurst died on December 13 (sic), 1932, in Springville, Utah. His interment, Evergreen Cemetery, Springville, Utah.

Bringhurst, William H.

Bringhurst, William H.
Springville, Utah US

William Bringhurst

Board of Trustees, Brigham Young Academy, 1875 to 1883. William Bringhurst, a member of the original BYA Board of Trustees, was born on November 8, 1818, in Philadelphia and came to Utah on October 10, 1847, with the John Taylor Company. He was bishop of the Springville Ward, a city councilman, a member of the Territorial Legislature, a director of the Provo Woolen Mills, a merchant, a farmer, and a stockraiser. ~ ~ ~ ~ William H. Bringhurst was born November 8, 1818 in Passyunk, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. He first married Ann Wollerton Dilworth on March 25, 1845 in Chester County, Pennsylvania. He second married Ellen Wiscombe on September 20, 1875, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died February 17, 1883 in Springville, Utah. Interment, Springville. His parents: Joseph Bringhurst and Elizabeth Evans Bringhurst. ~ ~ ~ ~ THE LAS VEGAS CONNECTION OF WILLIAM BRINGHURST, BY A.D. HOPKINSLAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL. By 1855, travelers already knew the harshness of the Mojave Desert. They knew that the 52-mile journey from the Muddy River to Las Vegas was best attempted in winter. Yet on June 13, perhaps 15 young men broke camp, filled every keg, bucket and fruit jar with water, cracked their bullwhips and headed southwest on a day one called the hottest he had ever seen. Men and oxen plodded all night, following a trail marked by bones. It was 3 p.m. on the 14th before they reached the good water and grass of Las Vegas. "Their teams and their wagons were pretty well used up," remarked their historian. Even so, some men dumped their other cargo, refilled water barrels, and headed back into the desert to help another party of 15 who were driving weaker teams and started the hard journey 24 hours later. It was June 15 before the last stragglers made it into camp. What drove men into the desert summer was not a matter of life and death, but of eternal life. Once assigned to teach their Mormon faith to the Indians of the Las Vegas Valley, they did not wait on a better season, but left almost at once. None would strive harder to complete the mission than its president, William A. Bringhurst. So committed he became that, when the mission's purpose was changed, he defied even the will of his church's leader, Brigham Young. Born in Philadelphia in 1818, Bringhurst married Ann Dillworth in 1845, and traveled to Utah with the John Taylor Company, arriving in 1847. But for nearly two years, beginning in 1855, the diaries of others paint his efforts to colonize, civilize and proselytize Las Vegas and its native inhabitants. Las Vegas was targeted for several reasons. The main road through Las Vegas, mislabeled as the "Old Spanish Trail" when John C. Fremont mapped it in 1844, became so important to Utah colonists that it was also called the "Mormon Road." Up that road came cuttings of California fruit trees, destined to bloom in Utah. Mormon converts from abroad landed at Pacific ports and traveled up the road to Utah. As early as 1851 church authorities envisioned a line of settlements, between the ports of the Pacific and Utah's southern counties, to provide travelers with food, fodder, and blacksmith services. The way stations also were to protect travelers and the mails from hostile Indians, and there may have been some hope of finding and exploiting minerals. Some historians have denied any relation between the Las Vegas Mission and the Mormons' fear of military confrontation with the United States. Yet an alliance with desert Indians was clearly on the mind of colonist John Steele, when he wrote: "We can have 1,000 brave warriors on hand in a short time to help quell the eruption that might take place." Brigham Young himself, in a meeting with departing missionaries that spring, said of the Indians "... by and by they will be the Lord's battle ax in good earnest." Ultimately, the differences were settled without war. The missionaries were supposed to teach the Las Vegas Paiutes, who were hunters and gatherers, how to farm. But in the eyes of many, notably Bringhurst, the main purpose was religious. Mormons believed American Indians, or Lamanites, were descendants of the people of ancient Israel, and it was the responsibility of Mormons to convert Lamanites to their religion. Though the missionaries hoped to live peaceably among the Indians, laying out a fort was almost their first step, commenced on June 18, only the second working day after their arrival. Part of this fort still stands at Las Vegas Boulevard and Washington Avenue. The location is three miles from Big Springs, but here Las Vegas Creek flowed down a hillside, allowing for a small water-powered mill. An uprising in central Utah in 1853 prompted Young to advise that forts be built in all new settlements, and as many as 35 were accordingly built by Mormons. The one in Las Vegas was large and well-designed by frontier standards, and those who saw it in its heyday wondered how farmers and missionaries came to build in such a military manner. Research by James Hinds, a Las Vegas military historian, found the probable answer. Steele, the fort's designer, had served in the Mormon Battalion during the Mexican War. The war carried him to Pueblo, in what is now Colorado, where he presumably had the chance to study nearby Bent's Fort, built by traders. Irish born, Steele also had lived in Scotland, where he would have had other opportunities to view fortifications. The main material for the fort was adobe brick, made on the spot. Foundations were stone. Walls were 14 feet high, 2 feet thick for the first 8 feet of height, and a foot thick above that. The fort's east wall doubled as the wall of "mess houses," or dwellings for families or groups of men who shared cooking and housekeeping chores. These were built inside the fort and faced out into the courtyard. Hinds found the messes were two stories high, and suggests the first floor must have been made of dirt and the second of rough wood planks. Wood was used sparingly, for the closest timber lay many miles away in the Spring Mountains. Nails also were in short supply, so rawhide thongs or wooden pegs would have been used to attach the planks to beams. There were holes in the wall for shooting at attackers, and two corners of the fort had bastions, protruding structures from which defenders might fire along the walls. Garden plots and farmland were apportioned to each man, and the fields were fenced with branches of thorny mesquite. The missionaries planted "grain of all sorts" and at first the crops grew well; in July Bringhurst remarked in a letter that the corn grew an inch and one half in 24 hours. But the soil proved too alkaline for many crops. By October, Steele wrote to a friend, "I planted three acres of corn, oats, peas, beans etc., and my oats came up most beautiful; and so did everything else, but ... the saleratus killed it, and I will not have three bushels of corn on it." Relations with the Indians began auspiciously. In July Bringhurst wrote the Deseret News, "Shortly after we arrived here, we assembled all the chiefs, and made an agreement (treaty) with them for permission to make a settlement on their lands. We agreed to treat them well, and they were to observe the same conduct towards us, and with all white men." The mission's recorder, George Washington Bean, had learned the Ute tongue years before. He found the Paiute language different but could make himself understood. Bean wrote that the Indians "helped us grub the land, make adobes, attend the mason and especially to herd the stock." The Paiutes' favorite unit of exchange was the squash, and they didn't expect many for a day's work. In the spring of 1856 the missionaries laid out a farm for the Indians, about a mile and a half north of the mission, plowed it and showed the Indians how to plant it. Trying to teach Paiutes to farm was not culturally hopeless, as some have depicted. Paiutes to the northeast had been farming at least 80 years. The missionaries, however, found they could not grow enough food to feed themselves and all the Paiutes. Colonists estimated at least 1,000 Indians lived in the Las Vegas Valley or near it; there were never more than 103 members of the Las Vegas Mission, and some of those were children too young to work. In the fall of 1856 the mission was 4,000 to 5,000 pounds short of the amount of flour required to sustain it until the next harvest. Bringhurst called upon men skilled with carpenter tools to go to California and work for the flour. That same year, some missionaries reported, a drought also hurt the Paiutes' traditional supplies of wild foods. Thefts became a problem. In July the mission books record, "Brother Bringhurst being informed that the Lamanites had been committing serious depredation upon the grain, melons, etc., by coming into the fields in the night time, he called up chief Joshua (Patsearump, a Paiute leader who had been baptized and thus had a Christian name also) and gave him to understand that such things must be stopped immediately ... Joshua pleaded his inability to govern his people when they were hungry, but his intentions were always good and friendly toward the brethren." In early August, at the Paiutes' request, Mormon riflemen brought their better weapons and joined them in a hunt, but no game was found. The mission log records: "Sunday, Aug. 17. At night the brethren were watching in the corn field and caught an Indian boy stealing corn. Several others were with him, but ran away before they could be gotten hold of. President Bringhurst ordered the boy chained up in the fort all night to see if it would have a salutary influence upon him and the others." "Monday, Aug. 18. In the morning the chief and some of the Indians came into camp, feeling perfectly friendly. They said it was alright to punish the boy, although some wanted to retaliate upon the cattle and horses, but the chief talked peace, saying that if they did not want to be tied up they must quit stealing. The boy was released early in the morning and sent to his camp." An ox was driven off but recovered. A calf was killed. Tensions grew among the missionaries themselves. Steele wrote, "Things began to change. The same old-fashioned sermons was preached and arses threatened to be kicked if men did not do what was wanted of them ... (I thought) that more mild treatment would do just as well." The discovery of lead nearby, at what is now called Mount Potosi, caused problems within the mission. In May 1856, Nathaniel V. Jones arrived in Las Vegas bearing orders from Young himself, and claiming authority to take men from the mission to work the mines. Steele related, "Jones presented his letter of instruction to President Bringhurst and there was a great storm between them calling each other anything but gentlemen." Bringhurst refused to accept Jones' authority. When food grew short, Bringhurst refused supplies to Jones' mining party, encamped southwest of Las Vegas at the location which would later be named Potosi. He refused to send the mission blacksmith to the mines. Jones returned to Salt Lake City to buy suitable material for an ore smelter. Returning Dec. 4, he bore a letter from Young, notifying Bringhurst that he had been "dropped from the mission and disfellowshipped from the Church." One week later, Bringhurst started for California. Getting the lead out proved to be even more challenging than harvesting a corn crop. The ore proved complex, and could not be profitably mined by smelting alone, yet there was insufficient water at the site for other processes. In January 1857, the Jones group abandoned the mines. The Las Vegas missionaries were allowed to leave the mission in March, though a few remained voluntarily. The final blow to the Mormon settlement came in the fall of 1858, when Indians who had not yet accepted the Mormons' teachings swept down from the mountains and stole the harvest from the fields. At a special conference in Santa Clara, Utah, church officials officially abandoned the Las Vegas Mission. Yet the mission was not such a failure as it might appear. The local Indians' relations with whites improved immediately upon the Mormons' arrival, and remained better, after their departure, than in much of the desert West. Las Vegas Paiutes retained their identity, and also part of their original home territory near the fort. They regained more of it in recent years, the Snow Mountain reservation. The Mormons' buildings and irrigation trenches, though unable to support 100 missionaries, did support ranchers who took them over later. The Mormon Fort was the seed of European-style civilization in Las Vegas. Bringhurst would soon regain good standing in the church. He served several years as bishop of the ward at Springville, Utah, and Young selected him as one the six founding trustees for Brigham Young Academy (now Brigham Young University). He died in February 1883. Standard directories of Utah pioneers, and a biography provided by the BYU public information office, do not mention his service at the Las Vegas Mission, though it consumed nearly two years of his life. [Las Vegas Review-Journal, February 7, 1999] Source.

Brinkerhoff, John Darwin

Brinkerhoff, John Darwin
Salt Lake City, Utah US

J. D. and Mary Brinkerhoff

Class of 1910. J. D. Brinkerhoff. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1910, in the Normal Department. Source: 1910 BYU Banyan, BYH section, list on p. 83. ~ ~ ~ ~ John Darwin Brinkerhoff was born February 9, 1890 in Huntington, Utah. His parents were Alonzo Brinkerhoff and Almira Barzilla Caldwell. He married Mary Adelaide Oviatt on May 3, 1911 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died on September 5, 1967 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Interment, Emery Town Cemetery, Utah.

Brinkerhoff, Joseph

Brinkerhoff, Joseph

Joseph Briinkerhoff

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1917. Joseph Brinkerhoff. He received an AB Degree in Agronomy & Agriculture in 1917. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 8, page 367.

Britsch, R. Lanier
518 East 500 South
Orem, Utah 84097-6439 US

Lanny & Shirley Britsch
  • Work: (801) 226-7097

Class of 1957. R. Lanier Britsch. Senior Class President. Football Co-Captain, Lettermen, Interpretive Speech, Childrens Theater, Band Vice President, Chorus, Boys State, Exchange Assembly, Seminary Play, Junior Prom Committee, Senior Hop Committee, Graduation Committee. Married JoAnn Murphy, and she is now deceased (see obituary below). Earned his B.A. and M.A. degrees at BYU in Asian Studies, and Anthropology, and History, respectively. His Ph.D. in Asian Studies (History of Asian Religion and Thought) is from Claremont Graduate University in California. He began teaching at BYU in 1966. Since that time he has taught a variety of subjects, mostly India, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, Christian missions in Asia, senior writing seminars, world religions (in Church History and Doctrine), and occasionally World Civilizations. His research and publications are primarily in LDS history in Asia and the Pacific. From 1986 to 1990, he served as Vice President for Academics at BYU-Hawaii, and from 1991 to 1997 he was director of the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies at BYU in Provo. Books, by R. Lanier Britsch: A. Non-Fiction -- Marriage & Family Genre (2): Counseling: A Guide to Helping Others, Vol. 1, Counseling: A Guide to Helping Others, Vol. 2. B. LDS History Genre (3): From the East: History of the Latter-day Saints in Asia, 1851-1996, Moramona: The Mormons in Hawai'i, Nothing More Heroic: The Compelling Story of the First Latter-day Saint Missionaries in India. It'll be 55 years this August. -- R. Lanier Britsch, the son of a BYU professor, enrolled with his brother, Todd, at the BYU elementary school in 1946. Both were hired to teach at BYU in 1966, fresh from their PhD programs. Both retired from BYU in June 2002. And no, they're not twins. ~ ~ ~ ~ OBITUARY: JoAnn Murphy Britsch, 1-23-1940 / 5-14-2005. Completing a life of love and service for her family, Church, students, neighbors and friends, JoAnn Murphy Britsch died at her home in Orem, May 14, 2005, of causes resulting from a fall while traveling in Eastern Europe. JoAnn was born January 23, 1940, in Rexburg, Idaho, to Lee and Louise Murphy. Her early years were spent in Archer and Moreland, Idaho, but her family moved to Idaho Falls while she was in elementary school. While in high school she participated in Girls State and many drama productions. She graduated from Idaho Falls High School in 1958, having received a scholarship to Brigham Young University. During her years at BYU she was active in student government and the Val Norn social unit. While in her senior year at BYU she met and married R. Lanier (Lanny) Britsch on December 18, 1961, in the Salt Lake Temple. They are the parents of four sons and two daughters. She graduated in May 1963, and taught English at Provo High School and Freshman English at BYU. In August 1964 she received her M.S. degree in English and Education. For the next two years she taught English at Claremont High School in Claremont, California, while her husband pursued doctoral studies. From early childhood JoAnn was an avid reader, almost consuming books day by day. Over the years she taught English composition part time at BYU and for two years as a full-time faculty member she taught an array of English subjects at BYU-Hawaii. JoAnn always held one position or another in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Teaching was her favorite calling, but she also presided in various auxiliaries of the Church. From 1993 to 2001, she served on the Materials Evaluation Committee of the Correlation Committee of the Church. During 2002-2003, she and Lanny served in the Honolulu Hawaii Mission with assignments at BYU-Hawaii and the Polynesian Cultural Center. While there she served as an ordinance worker in the Laie Hawaii Temple. At the time of her passing she served as Gospel Essentials teacher in her Orem ward. JoAnn loved art, especially watercolor painting. But she was a better critic and coach than artist and had wonderful taste in interior design. She passionately loved travel, eventually visiting forty-six nations. That which is beautiful touched her most. A neighbor said of her: "She was always so thoughtful, kind, attentive, supportive, artistic, understanding, sympathetic, loyal, intelligent, wise and fun. She seemed to have no ego problems and was one of the most highly evolved people I've been blessed to associate with in my life." JoAnn is survived by her husband, Lanny, of Orem; children, Carl (JoLynne) of Houston, Texas; Catherine (David) Frantz of Charlottesville, Virginia; Curtis (Julie) of Pleasant Grove; Sheri of Honolulu, Hawaii; Randall (Rebecca) of Provo; and James ( Brittany) of Chadron, Nebraska; fifteen grandchildren; and a brother, Donald (Rebecca) Murphy of Idaho Falls. Funeral services will be held Thursday, May 19, 2005, at 11:00 a.m. in the Sharon Stake Center, 750 South 800 East, Orem. Friends may call Wednesday evening from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Walker Sanderson Funeral Home, 646 East 800 North, Orem, and from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. prior to the services at the chapel. Interment in East Lawn Memorial Hills. [Provo Daily Herald, May 17, 2005.] ~ ~ ~ ~ Lanny second married Shirley.

Britsch, Royden E.
2412 Goldenmoon St
Las Vegas, Nevada 89108-4477 US

Royden and Christine Britsch
  • Work: 702-889-9898
  • Cell: 702-785-3550
  • Home: (702) 395-9989

Class of 1967. Royden Britsch. German Club, Honor Society, Letterman, Chorus, Band, Football, Wrestling. BYU BA Humanities 1973. Married Christine Jamison. He has taught at BYU–Hawaii and at Grambling State University. University of Utah, Master of Public Administration. Research: The Salt Lake County Jail Libraries: A Case Study of Inter-Agency Cooperation and a Proposed Method of Management, Royden E. Britsch. @2007 ~ ~ ~ ~ Email sent to royden.britsch@cliffordcommercial.com bounced back. @2010

Britsch, Todd A.
695 East 3230 North
Provo, Utah 84604-4728 US

Todd and Dorothy Britsch
  • Work: (801) 374-5261

Class of 1955. Todd A. Britsch. Y'ld Cat Newspaper Editor, Debate, Debate State Champ, Student Council, Chorus, Quill & Scroll, Thespians, Childrens Theater, Honor Roll, Graduation Committee. Six months active duty in Army Reserves. Mission to Switzerland and Austria. Played cello in the orchestra at BYU, and was on the College Bowl team on television. BYU BA Political Science 1962. Studied one year at the University of Hamburg, Germany, as a Fulbright Scholar. Married Dorothy Irene Crofts in Swiss Temple. Florida State University MA Comparative Literature 1965, FSU PhD Humanities 1966. Joined BYU Faculty, Professor of Humanities for 36 years, retired in 2002. Teacher and administrator. Church service including bishop, high counselor, MTC branch president, etc. Two adopted children. Walking, reaching, concerts, sports and travel. ~~ Anyone driving down University Avenue in Provo cannot help but be impressed with the Academy Building that almost literally rises from the ashes. But for those of us whose lives were shaped and directed there, the restored Academy Building evokes rich and plentiful memories of a time long past. Although it is now hard to separate the imagined from the real, to us this was a place of dreams, where our aspirations became fixed and where learning almost always seemed natural and inviting. The old buildings there gave us a link both to founding experiences of the past and to the emerging greatness of the university. This link was so strong, in fact, that some of us never could leave the school we learned to love there (thus three of the past four BYU academic vice presidents were B.Y. High graduates). A good number of my classmates at B.Y. High went from kindergarten through their bachelor degrees in schools that were part of BYU. I was a relative latecomer, entering the Training School in the fourth grade... [See also: http://www.magazine.byu.edu/article.tpl?num=33-Sum01 ] [See also: http://www.byu.edu/fc/pages/citizpages/britsch.html ] --- Todd A. Britsch, the son of a BYU professor, enrolled with his brother, Lanny, at at the BYU elementary school in 1946. Both were hired to teach at BYU in 1966, fresh from their PhD programs. Both retired from BYU in June 2002. And no, they're not twins. ---- HIS WIFE'S OBITUARY: Dorothy Irene Crofts Britsch, 63, died at home on Wednesday, April 30, 2003, of cancer. Dorothy was born June 7, 1939, in Seattle, Washington, to Hyrum and Alicia Dansie Crofts. After spending parts of her childhood in Portland, Oregon; Henderson, Nevada; and San Francisco, California, she moved with her family to Menlo Park, California, and graduated later from Menlo- Atherton High School. Dorothy spent her freshman year of college at San Jose State University and then transferred to Brigham Young University. At BYU she was very active in student affairs, serving in various government positions and in the Homecoming royalty. She graduated with a B.S. degree in business in May, 1961. She returned to BYU the next fall to take classes in the arts and humanities–subjects that would occupy much of her interest for the remainder of her life. During that year she became engaged to Todd A. Britsch. Dorothy and Todd were married in the Bern, Switzerland, L.D.S. Temple on March 12, 1963. After graduate school in Florida, they moved to Provo in 1966, when Todd joined the BYU faculty. They are the parents of two children, Julie and Daniel. Dorothy also had the joy of providing devoted care for her three grandchildren for several years. She served in a variety of church positions, including Primary president. She also served twice on the BYU campus – as YWMIA president in the BYU Fourth Stake and as Relief Society president in the BYU Eleventh Stake. Dorothy is survived by her husband, Todd, and her daughter, Julie (Jason) Hartup, and Julie's children Chase, Jennifer, and Paige, all of Provo; she is also survived by three sisters: Beverly (David) Fuhriman of Moraga, California; Shirley (James) Monroe of Martinez, California; and Marcia (Jerry) McClain of Salt Lake City. In addition, she is survived by her mother-in-law, Florence Britsch, of Provo, Todd's brothers and sisters and their spouses, and by many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents and her son Dan. Interment, East Lawn Memorial Hills Cemetery in Provo. [Deseret News, Sunday, May 4, 2003.] Email: tab4@email.byu.edu Alt email: todd_britsch@byu.edu @2005 ~ ~ ~ ~ The BYH Class of 1955 will celebrate its 55th-Year Reunion in 2010! The reunion will be held on Friday evening, July 2, 2010 at the Courtyard Marriott in Provo. Time and other details will be forthcoming. For details, contact Todd Britsch at toddbritsch@gmail.com @2010

Broadbent, Charles Nuttall

Broadbent, Charles Nuttall

Charles Broadbent

B. Y. Academy High School Graduate, Class of 1901. Charles Nuttall Broadbent. He received a "Normal Diploma". Source: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, Page 78.

Broadbent, David Albert

Broadbent, David Albert
Logan, Utah US

David and Mima Broadbent

BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1897. David Albert Broadbent. Received the degree of Bachelor of Pedagogy (B. Pd.) on May 27, 1897. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 27, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 2: [David Broadbent. Name contained in an informal "Cast of Characters" graduation / advertising program of 1897.] ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 3: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, page 33. ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 4: Program, BYA Exercises Class of ' 97, Normal Department. ~ ~ ~ ~ David Albert Broadbent was born on May 14, 1871 in Goshen, Utah. His parents were Thomas Broadbent and Mary Jane Nuttall. He married Mima Melissa Murdock on May 1, 1901 in Manti, Utah. He died on May 2, 1962 in Logan, Utah. Interment, Heber City, Utah.

Broadbent, Nathan E. [ I ]
13103 32nd Street SE
Snohomish, Washington 98290 US

Nathan Broadbent
  • Work: (425) 334-9420

Class of 1970. Nathan E. Broadbent I. BYU BS Manufacturing Technology 1977. Note: Nathan E. Broadbent II of Orem, Utah received an Agricultural System Technology degree from BYU Idaho in 1999. Son's email: nabroadbent@comcast.net

Broadbent, Norma Rae
1709 Fairway Lane
Spanish Fork, Utah 84660 US

Norma and Clyde Nielsen
  • Cell: 801-360-8889
  • Home: 801-798-9323

Class of 1961. Norma Rae Broadbent. Dramatics, Seminary Achievement Certificate, USU Scholarship, Honor Roll. ~ ~ ~ ~ Graduated from USU in French and taught high school for 22 years. Married Clyde Nielsen in 1965; 6 children, 19 grandchildren (2005); committee member of 45th class reunion in 2006, and 50th class reunion in 2011. @2011

Broadbent, Serena

Broadbent, Serena
Orem, Utah US

Serena and Hyrum Vance

Faculty & Staff. Serena Broadbent Vance, Training School, 1907-1908. ~ ~ ~ ~ Serena Broadbent was born on November 4, 1880 in Santaquin, Utah. Her parents were Thomas Broadbent and Mary Jane Nuttall Broadbent. She married Hyrum Sanford Vance on August 19, 1903 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Serena Broadbent Vance died on July 24, 1967 in Orem, Utah. Interment, Provo City Cemetery.

Broadbent, Thomas Lowell (F&S)

Broadbent, Thomas Lowell (F&S)
Riverside, California US

Tom and Wilma Broadbent

Faculty & Staff. Thomas Lowell Broadbent, Languages and Economics, 1935-1939. He could recite the story of "The Three Bears" in German. Left Utah Valley to be employed at the University of Utah. Son, Thomas Broadbent, BYH Class of 1952~H. Thomas Lowell Broadbent died in 1993. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Thomas Lowell Broadbent, 83, of Riverside, California, formerly of Salt Lake City, died December 26, 1993 in Riverside, California. Born in Provo, he was the son of Thomas S. and Violet Long Broadbent. He served an LDS mission to Germany prior to receiving his BA and MA from BYU, and his Ph.D. from University of Michigan. He was an officer in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He taught German language and literature at BYH and BYU until 1947, and then at the University of Utah until 1953. He moved to Riverside to help establish a new campus of University of California, where he served as Dean of Students, Professor of German, and Associate Dean of College of Letters and Science. He was a member of the LDS Church and was active in several community organizations. Survivors include his wife of 60 years, Wilma Valentine Broadbent; two sons, Thomas V. Broadbent of Los Gatos, Calif.; and L. Clark Broadbent of New Haven, Connecticut; a daughter, Beverly B. Creer of Avon, Connecticut; two sisters, Hermese B. Ogden of Salt Lake City; and Margaret Nielsen of Provo; and four grandchildren. A student award is given annually in his honor at the University of California, Riverside. Contributions may be sent to the Dean Thomas L. Broadbent Award Endowment Fund, U.C. Riverside Foundation, University of California, Riverside, California; 92521-0321 [Deseret News, Wednesday, February 2, 1994.] ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS WIFE'S OBITUARY: Wilma Leota Valentine Broadbent, 92, of Avon, Connecticut, died Saturday January 20, 2001. Born in Brigham City, Utah on March 25, 1908 to Nephi and Ottolina Bengston Valentine, she graduated from Box Elder High School in 1926 and from Dee Hospital School of Nursing in Ogden, Utah in 1929. In 1933, she married Thomas Lowell Broadbent (deceased 1993) in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. They lived for many years in Provo and Salt Lake City before moving in 1953 to Riverside, California, where he was a charter faculty member of the University of California at Riverside, and she helped establish its Student Health Center. Active in the LDS Church and in university and community affairs, Wilma was optimistic, fun-loving and known for her tolerance and skill in reaching out to others. She moved to Connecticut in 1996. Survivors are a sister, Grace Price, Brigham City; three children, Thomas V. Broadbent [BYH Class of 1952~H] (Ellen), Los Gatos, CA; Beverly Broadbent Creer (Leland), Avon Connecticut; Lee Clark Broadbent (Denise), New Haven, Connecticut; four grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; a brother-in-law and three sisters-in-law, Sil and Hermese Ogden and Amy Y. Valentine, all of Salt Lake City; and Margaret Nielsen, of Provo. Memorial services were held at the West Hartford, Connecticut LDS Ward and also at Riverside National Cemetery. [Deseret News, February 4, 2001.]

Broadbent, Thomas V. (1952~H)

Broadbent, Thomas V. (1952~H)
Los Gatos, California US

Thomas and Ellen Broadbent

Class of 1952 ~ Honorary. Thomas V. Broadbent. Attended BYJrH through 7th grade, then his father was employed by the University of Utah. He grew up in SLC, went to East High and the University of Utah, but maintained his BYH friendships. He married Ellen. He is an editor for a publishing company. ~ ~ ~ ~ His parents: Thomas Lowell Broadbent, and Wilma Leota Valentine Broadbent, married in Salt Lake City in 1933. The Broadbent family lived for many years in Provo and Salt Lake City before moving in 1953 to Riverside, California, where Thomas L. Broadbent was a charter faculty member of the University of California at Riverside, and Wilma Broadbent, a nurse, helped establish the UCR Student Health Center. They had three children: Thomas V. Broadbent [BYH Class of 1952~H] (Ellen) of Los Gatos, California; Beverly Broadbent (Leland) Creer, of Avon, Connecticut; and Lee Clark (Denise) Broadbent, of New Haven, Connecticut. @ 2001 ~ ~ ~ ~ Thomas V. Broadbent was born on May 7, 1935 in Provo, Utah. He died on September 28, 2008 in San Jose, California. His interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Broadhead, Don [Joseph Don]

Broadhead, Don [Joseph Don]
Provo, Utah US

Don and Joyce Broadhead

Class of 1947. J. Don Broadhead. Married Joyce LeeMaster. (See Don and Joyce photo on Class of 1949 reunions page.) ~ ~ ~ ~ Joyce LeeMaster and J. Don Broadhead have the following children: Terry Don Broadhead, Vicki Broadhead, Stuart A. (Malissa Bandley) Broadhead, one more. Don is 81. @2011 ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Joseph Don Broadhead, 83, son of Spencer Broadhead and Jocie Smith Broadhead, born in Rupert, Idaho on July 18 1929, died on March 1, 2013, Provo Utah. Married Joyce LeeMaster May 3, 1950. Marriage later made eternal Salt Lake City LDS temple. Survived by wife Joyce and children Terry Broadhead, Vicki Coombs, Mike and Stuart Broadhead, brothers Stirling, Kent and John Broadhead, many grandchildren and great- grandchildren. Don was a faithful member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served others as bishop, temple worker, couples missionary to Jackson, Mississippi, and in a wide variety of ward and stake callings. His greatest pleasure was being with his family. He was loved by all who knew him and will be sorely missed. A viewing will be held on Thursday, March 7 2013 from 9 am - 10:30 am at the LDS Ward Chapel, 2950 North Canyon Rd. in Provo. Funeral service will follow at 11 am. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to the LDS Church Missionary Fund. [Provo Daily Herald, Monday, March 4, 2013]

Broadhead, Kent S.

Broadhead, Kent S.
3658 West 5180 South
Salt Lake City, Utah 84118-3584 US

Kent and Betty Broadhead
  • Home: 801-955-2866

Class of 1949. Kent S. Broadhead. Guard on the 1949 basketball team that won the State Class B championship. Nickname: Kent "No Shoot" Broadhead, because he would pass off brilliantly rather than take a shot. He was considered the sparkplug of the team. Also Football, Band, Chorus, Opera. He graduated from BYH on May 26, 1949. Source: 1949 BYH Graduation Exercises Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ University of Utah BS Civil Engineering 1957. Photo does not appear in 1949 Wildcat yearbook -- he says he might have "sluffed" the day photos were taken. ~ ~ First marriage: Janice Val Anderson, also BYH Class of 1949. Janice's parents: Hyrum S. Anderson and Valentine Larsen Anderson. Janice was born on January 30, 1931, in Fairview, Utah. She died on August 29, 1963, in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment: Provo City Cemetery. ~ ~ Second marriage: Betty Daniels Burnside (see below). ~ ~ ~ ~ Editor's note: Kent deserves immense credit for pioneering, enhancing and supporting this Brigham Young Academy / Brigham Young University High School website, and for acting as a guardian angel for the BYH alumni of his generation. ~ ~ ~ ~ (See photo of Kent and Betty on the Class of 1949 reunions page.) ~ ~ ~ ~ BETTY'S OBITUARY: Betty Jean Daniels Burnside Broadhead died peacefully Tuesday, May 11, 2010, surrounded by her family. She had fought a courageous battle against emphysema for five years. Betty was born April 3, 1929 in Mt. Pleasant, Utah, daughter of Charles H. and Alice H. Andersen Daniels. She attended school in Eureka, Utah and North Sanpete High School, Mt. Pleasant, Utah, graduating in 1947. She first married Bernard Burnside in 1953; he died in 1960. She married Kent S. Broadhead on October 1, 1966 in Ely, Nevada; married for time and eternity in the Jordan River Temple September 10, 1997. Betty worked in earlier years for Mountain Bell Telephone Company in Salt Lake City. After marriage she "retired" to spend her remaining years as a mother, wife and grandmother. In the 1960's she was deeply involved in the Scouting program. In 1999-2000 Betty and Kent served as LDS missionaries in East and West Malaysia, part of the Singapore Mission. Betty states this was the happiest time in her life. She was a faithful visiting teacher and edited the monthly ward Relief Society newsletter for several years. She was an ultimate organizer and a "Momma Bear" for her extended family. She was a Red Hatter, member of the DUP and an avid family historian. Her survivors include children: Raymond Shepherd, Phoenix, Arizona; Ralynn (Robert) Buttars, Kearns, Utah; Craig (Janet) Broadhead, St. George, Utah; Charles (Sandy) Burnside, Taylorsville, Utah; Bret Burnside, Taylorsville, Utah; 13 grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren. The family requests no flowers. If you choose, make a donation to the Perpetual Education Fund or a charity of your choice. Funeral services will be held on Monday, May 17, 2010, 11 a.m. at the Jordan Stake House, 3700 West 4700 South, Taylorsville, Utah. Friends and family may attend a viewing Sunday, 6-8 p.m. at McDougal Funeral Home, 4330 South Redwood Road, Taylorsville, Utah and Monday at the church, 10-10:45 a.m. Interment, Provo City Cemetery. [Salt Lake Tribune, May 15 to May 16, 2010.] ~ ~ ~ ~ Veteran's Project.

Broadhead, Merlin

Broadhead, Merlin
Star Route
Duchesne, Utah US

Merlin & Lorraine Broadhead

Class of 1927. Merlin Broadhead. Merlin is pictured with the BYH Class of 1927 in the BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section. ~ ~ ~ ~ Merlin Broadhead was born December 5, 1909, in Heber, Utah. His parents were Thomas Golden Broadhead and Barbara Ann McFee Broadhead. Merlin married elementary school teacher Lorraine Mary Sheranian on March 5, 1938 in Vernal, Utah. [Uintah Basin Record, March 11, 1938]. Merlin Broadhead died on June 20, 1987, and was buried as "Murland" Broadhead in Roosevelt Memorial Park, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ OBITUARY OF HIS BROTHER: Ray Deloy Broadhead, brother of Merlin Broadhead, passed away October 7, 1997 at age 78, in St. George, Utah following a courageous battle with cancer. He was born December 17, 1918 in Tabiona, Utah to Thomas Golden Broadhead and Barbara Ann McAffee Broadhead, married Lila W. Johnson, Salt Lake Temple, March 24, 1939, later divorced. Ray was raised on the family homestead in Duchesne County. He was a hard working cattle rancher, and a man of integrity, with a great love of the outdoors. He retired in Hurricane, later to Santa Clara. Survived by children: Barbara Ann (Richard) Ewell, Provo, Utah; Karen Tanner, Boise, Idaho; Floyd (Cheryl) Broadhead, Neola, Utah; Vicki Mae (Terry) Swope, Sandy, Utah; and Jan (James) Romney, Taylorsville, Utah; 20 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren; brother, Delbert Broadhead, Tabiona, Utah. Preceded in death by his parents and infant daughter; brothers; Harold, Melvin and Merlin, sisters; Alta Mickelson, Chloe Humbach, Fern Crandall. Graveside services were held Saturday, Oct. 11, at Santa Clara City Cemetery. [Deseret News, Thursday, October 9, 1997]

Broadhead, Stirling Spencer
9660 Armley Avenue
Whittier, California 90604 US

Stirling and Bevis Broadhead
  • Work: 562-696-7642

Class of 1946. Sterling Spencer Broadhead. He graduated from BYH on May 23, 1946. Source: 1946 BYH Graduation Exercises Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ Brief biography written May, 2005, Whittier, California: "I was born in Pleasant Grove, Utah, 03 December 1927. Our family lived in Rupert, Idaho, from 1928 to 1941, where I attended grades 1-7. We moved to Provo, Utah in 1941. I attended Dixon Junior High School, grades 8-9. and BY High School, grades 10-11-12. During my three years at Y High my teachers included Golden Woolf (Principal and Religion), Anna B. Hart (English), Julia Caine (History), A. John Clarke (Science), C.L. Jensen (Math and Bookkeeping), and Dave Crowton (Physical Education & Health) I volunteered and became a soldier in the U.S. Army in September of 1946, going to Japan in 1947 as a soldier in the Occupation Army of Japan, discharged January of 1948. I began my college career at BYU that month, graduating in 1952 with a major in Education. I began teaching school in Ely, Nevada, in 1952, 7th grade, including being the physical education teacher for both boys and girls in grades 6-7-8. Later I became a vice-principal and completed my eight years in Ely as Coordinator-Supervisor of White Pine County Schools. While in Ely I returned to BYU for three summers to work on my Masters degree. I married Bevis Young from Ely in 1956. We have three sons and one daughter. In 1960 we moved to Whittier, California, where I was employed by the Little Lake City School District, having positions as 7th - 8th grade supervisor, assistant principal of a junior high school, district instructional materials coordinator, and elementary principal for 24 years, retiring in 1987. I’ve always been an active Latter Day Saint, having served as Stake Sunday School Superintendent, bishop’s counselor, bishop for seven years, stake high counselor, counselor in the Whittier Stake presidency for six years, and High Priest Group instructor. Presently I teach the Gospel Doctrine class. Our sons and daughter have all married in the temple, and all are active Latter Day Saints. We have sixteen grandchildren, two of them serving on missions at the time of this writing, and others awaiting their turns. Two of my younger brothers are BY High graduates: (1) Don, graduating in the Class of 1947; (2) Kent, graduating in the Class of 1949." Alternate email: broadhe5@yahoo.com ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS WIFE'S OBITUARY: Bevis Young Broadhead was born November 12, 1933 in Ely, Nevada to Harvey and Florence Young. She passed away peacefully in her home on November 15, 2014 following a long illness. She was the oldest of four children: Harvey Young Jr, Gene Young, and Millie Young (Luscher). Bevis was raised in Ely, Nevada and graduated from White Pine High School in 1951. She attended Nursing School for a time at Westminster and Brigham Young University. While living in Ely, she met the love of her life, Stirling Spencer Broadhead and married on June 15, 1956. They were sealed in the Los Angeles Temple on March 10, 1962, and are the parents of four children: Stirling (Lori) Broadhead, Stephen (Amy) Broadhead, David (Sharon) Broadhead, and Mary (Mike) Norton, 16 grandchildren and 5 great-grandchildren. Bevis was an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and served in many callings and organizations. She was an exceptional pianist and musician, and served as the ward chorister and choir director for many years. She directed stake choirs and musical productions. One of her favorite callings was serving as the Young Women's President where she helped influence and mold the lives of many young ladies in her ward and neighborhood. She was kind and caring to everyone she met, and made all around her feel important because of her unconditional love. However her greatest achievement was in being a wonderful wife, mother and grandmother to her family members. Bevis was a perfectionist, and taught her children the importance of integrity, hard work and service to others. Her cooking skills were second to none, and her family and friends always enjoyed the creative dishes she prepared. She was selfless in her service toward others, and a true disciple of her Savior, Jesus Christ. She will be missed by all who had the privilege of associating with her. Bevis is survived by her husband Stirling, sister Millie, and her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. Preceded in death by her parents and two brothers. The family would like to thank the caregivers at Millcreek Home Health and Hospice for their gentle and loving care toward our mother. Funeral services will be held November 21, 2014, 11 am, at the Cottonwood 11th Ward, 1830 E. 6400 S, Murray. Friends may call Friday 9-10:30 am at the church prior to services. Interment at the Larkin Sunset Gardens Cemetery, 1950 E. 10600 S., Sandy. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests donations may be made to the LDS General Missionary Fund or the LDS Perpetual Education Fund. Online condolences may be shared at www. larkinmortuary.com [Deseret News, November 19 to 20, 2014]

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